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Michel Bauwens

Benjamin Lee - Derivatives and the Wealth of Societies : holochain

"Anthropological accounts of ritual performativity inevitably go back to the gift. As elaborated in the works of Marcel Mauss, Claude Lévi Strauss, and Pierre Bourdieu, ritual constitutes a foundational alternative to Hobbes’s contract theory (performative in its own “rite” as the exchange of promises) as a way to conceptualize the origins of society. Ritual exchanges foreground the connections among volatility, uncertainty, and circulation. What, for instance, were the implications of exchanging women with other social groups with whom you were in competition? Ritual exchanges were seen as moments of danger but also opportunities to increase wealth, especially in the form of new social relations. Cross-culturally and transhistorically, social wealth always consists of a portfolio of claims and obligations that require constant care and upkeep.

Ritualized exchange creates new forms of social wealth by creating new social relations among idealized social groups. Rituals create a template or inscription of an idealized social form. If the ritual is properly enacted, the benign, transcendent force of the idealized macrocosm is brought to bear upon the social group. Successful participation transforms the ritual event into an instance of the manifestation of the idealized macrocosm. Rituals achieve this goal partly by enabling exchanges that transform social uncertainty (what does it mean if cross-cousins marry?) into manageable risks.

At the core of these exchanges is the interplay of gift and countergift. A gift is like a derivative swap in which two cash fl ows (in ritual, two sets of social claims and obligations) are exchanged. Gift and counter-gift must not be identical and have to be separated by an interval of time. This allows the possibility of strategic manipulation as does the optionality embedded in all derivatives. "

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Michel Bauwens

All we have left is each other: Mutual Aid Networks Summit - Shareable

"Lodève Tiers place: we may accompany an inclusive Third place in a devastated area

Commons Digital co-op: we are since 3 years nourishing a coop project based on a disruptive political and economical model in order to be able to develop and serve all digital services needed while giving jobs to youth and old excluded people."

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Michel Bauwens

Sustainability is not enough: we need regenerative cultures | by Daniel Christian Wahl | Medium

"One proposal for guiding wise action in the face of dynamic complexity and ‘not knowing’ is to apply the Precautionary Principle as a framework that aims to avoid, as far as possible, actions that will negatively impact on environmental and human health in the future. From the United Nation’s ‘World Charter for Nature’ in 1982, to the Montreal Protocol on Health in 1987, to the Rio Declaration in 1992, the Kyoto Protocol, and Rio+20 in 2012, we have committed to applying the Precautionary Principle over and over again.
The Wingspread Consensus Statement on the Precautionary Principle states: “When an activity raises threats of harm to human health or the environment, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause and effect relationships are not fully established scientifically” (Wingspread Statement, 1998). The principle puts the burden of proof that a certain action is not harmful on those proposing and taking the action, yet general practice continues to allow all actions that have not (yet!) been proven to have potentially harmful effects to go ahead unscrutinized. In a nutshell, the Precautionary Principle can be summarized as follows: practice precaution in the face of uncertainty. This is not what we are doing.
While high-level UN groups and many national governments have repeatedly considered the Precautionary Principle as a wise way to guide actions, day-to-day practice shows that it is very hard to implement, as there will always be some degree of uncertainty. The Precautionary Principle could also potentially stop sustainable innovation and block potentially highly beneficial new technologies on the basis that it cannot be proven with certainty that these technologies will not result in unexpected future side-effects that could be detrimental to human or environmental health.
Why not challenge designers, technologists, policy-makers, and planning professionals to evaluate their proposed actions on their positive, life-sustaining, restorative and regenerative potential?
Why not limit the scale of implementation of any innovation to local and regional levels until proof of its positive impact is unequivocally demonstrated?
Aiming to design for systemic health may not save us from unexpected side-effects and uncertainty, but it offers a trial and error path towards a regenerative culture. We urgently need a Hippocratic Oath for design, technology and planning: do no harm! To make this ethical imperative operational we need a salutogenic (health generating) intention behind all design, technology and planning: We need to design for human, ecosystems and planetary health. This way we can move more swiftly from the unsustainable ‘business as usual’ to restorative and regenerative innovations that will support the transition towards a regenerative culture."

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Michel Bauwens

Blockchain Code as Antitrust by Thibault Schrepel, Vitalik Buterin :: SSRN

"In this article, we show that blockchain can help in reaching the goals of antitrust law in situations where the rule of law does not apply. We detail what needs to be done to this end, from both a technical and legal standpoint."

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Michel Bauwens

The DAO Attack: Understanding What Happened – CoinDesk

"In this piece, Siegal attempts to help journalists understand the DAO attack and what happened when The DAO collapsed and why he believes it’s important for the press to get the story right. "

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