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UNC Pharmacy

UNC Pharmacy's Public Library

May 03, 16

The cost of new oral cancer medicines is rising no matter how you slice it.

Drug makers also argue that high prices for such treatments are justified since the patient populations can be relatively small. Instead, costs keep rising even as additional regulatory approvals widen the number of patients who can be treated, said Stacie Dusetzina, the JAMA Oncology author and a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who specializes in pharmaceutical outcomes..

May 02, 16

The $10,000-a-month cancer drug has become the new normal, to the dismay of physicians and patients who increasingly face the burden of financial toxicity. A pair of new studies illustrates just how recently that pricing model has come into vogue and pulls back the curtain on the strange market forces that push prices steadily higher in the years after the treatments are launched.

"When the pharmaceutical industry makes comments about setting the price high for a small patient population, that argument seems logically sound, because we recognize there’s a large amount of financial investment into drugs," said Stacie Dusetzina, a health services researcher at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. To see the price rising when drugs gain other approvals runs counter to that line of reasoning.

"Those arguments are not the basis on which the industry is arguing about the initial pricing," Dusetzina said. "They’re increasing the price as the patient population grows, because I think they’re profit-maximizing first."

May 02, 16

The cost of new cancer drugs that can be taken in pill form has risen dramatically, raising questions about the system of pricing new drugs, according to a study in JAMA Oncology.

The study found that orally administered cancer drugs launched in 2000 cost an average of $1,869 per month; those approved in 2014 cost an average of $11,325 per month.

"The major trend here is that these products are just getting more expensive over time," said Stacie Dusetzina, author of the study and an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

May 02, 16

A new study has showed that new cancer drugs, available in pill form, are six times more expensive compared with drugs launched 15 years ago.

“Patients are increasingly taking on the burden of paying for these high-cost specialty drugs as plans move toward use of higher deductibles and co-insurance – where a patient will pay a percentage of the drug cost rather than a flat copay,” said a study author, Dr. Stacie Dusetzina from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an assistant professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

May 02, 16

A new research has revealed that since 2000, cancer has become one of the costliest and the most perilous illness to treat. The price of cancer medication has increased considerably and cancer drugs have become costlier in comparison to the medications that were used for treatment 15 years ago.

"Patients are increasingly taking on the burden of paying for these high-cost specialty drugs as plans move toward use of higher deductibles and co-insurance - where a patient will pay a percentage of the drug cost rather than a flat copay," said a study author, Dr. Stacie Dusetzina from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an assistant professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

May 02, 16

Meanwhile, a novel compound had shown promise in preclinical studies as a treatment for acute myeloid leukemia, more than doubling median days of survival even in a drug-resistant form of the disease, according to University of North Carolina Health Care System.

According to researchers at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, the Aflac Cancer & Blood Disorders Center in Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine, and at other institutions MRX-2843 blocked the growth of acute myeloid leukemia cells, led to a significant level of cancer cell death and more than doubled the median days of survival in laboratory models with a drug-resistant form of the disease.

Apr 29, 16

As rising drug costs have become a topic of intense debate, a new review finds a significant increase for some cancer drugs. The cost of certain oral medications for cancer treatment have increased multiple-fold since 2000, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"The major trend here is that these products are just getting more expensive over time," study author Stacie Dusetzina, of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and an assistant professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, said in a statement today.

Apr 13, 16

The advent of targeted drugs for a specific type of breast cancer - HER2 positive - has dramatically improved survival rates for women with the disease. But a study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveals low rates of use of a targeted drug among older women with early-stage breast cancer of this type, and even lower rates for older black women.

Apr 05, 16

It earned the number one ranking in the 2017 edition of America's Best Graduate Schools.

Apr 05, 16

UNC-Chapel Hill had a “We’re No. 1!” party Wednesday, but it had nothing to do with basketball.

Apr 05, 16

Leaders from around the UNC campus gathered on Wednesday to honor students and faculty at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy, after the school was named the top pharmacy school in the country by US News and World Report. The School of Pharmacy was one of several graduate programs to receive high marks. Dean Bob Blouin […]

Mar 22, 16

ASHEVILLE, N.C. -- Pharmacy students on the UNCA campus are celebrating a major achievement for the school of pharmacy. US News just ranked the UNC Eshelman school of pharmacy as the number-one pharmacy school in the nation.The school of pharmacy is techni

Mar 16, 16

Daily doses of the tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine combo pill (Truvada/Gilead) protect women from being infected by an HIV positive sex partner, but the anti-viral drug will lower the risk for men who take only two doses a week, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina (UNC). "Our data highlight the fact that one dose does not fit all," said Angela D.M. Kashuba PharmD, senior author and a professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Kashuba and her co-authors are the first to explain why other studies have shown that Truvada has been more effective for men than women with similar adherence rates.

Mar 11, 16

Stem cells from a patient’s own skin may help fight the most common and most aggressive forms of brain cancer, according to University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers who tested the theory in a lab.

“We worked on this aspect of stem cells where the stem cells can actually chase cancer,” said UNC professor of molecular pharmaceutics Shawn Hingtgen.

Mar 10, 16

Pharmacy researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have turned skin cells into cancer-hunting stem cells that destroy brain tumors- a first for medical science. The stem cells destroyed glioblastoma, offering a new and more effective treatment for the disease for the first time in more than 30 years.

Mar 10, 16

In a normal competitive market, prices influence what people buy — but not in health care. Brand-name drugs generally do not compete on price, because physicians and patients rarely pick treatments based on price — and often are not even aware what the prices are.

To track how Gleevec became a multibillion-dollar drug, The Washington Post used the median amount paid by privately insured patients and their health plans before discounts and rebates, an analysis prepared by health services researcher Stacie Dusetzina of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill using data from Truven Health Analytics.

Mar 08, 16

Women need a higher dose of antiviral medication to prevent HIV infection than their male peers, experts have warned.
Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) drugs have been proven to help reduce the chances of at-risk individuals contracting the virus.
In the US, Truvada is the only PrEP medication approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration.
Now, a new study has revealed, while the drugs are deemed highly effective, men and women require different doses.

Mar 03, 16

Fill your prescription, or pay the bills? It's the tough decision more are forced to make as prices for the most common prescriptions double.

Over the last year, prescription costs have shot up more than any other category of medical care. News 13's investigative unit is cracking the prescription-drug shell game to show you what's behind the steep increases, and what you can do to get the lowest price.

"There's a number called an NDC number. It's very specific for drug products. They'll give you the generic they have on their shelf, and they're giving you accurate information. It just may not be the same generic that CVS has on their shelf," said Stephanie Kiser, director of rural health and wellness for the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, which is part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Feb 25, 16

Researchers at the University of North Carolina turned skin cells into cancer-hunting stem cells that can destroy brain cancer, according to a new study.

"We wanted to find out if these induced neural stem cells would home in on cancer cells and whether they could be used to deliver a therapeutic agent," Dr. Shawn Hingtgen, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina, said in a press release. "This is the first time this direct reprogramming technology has been used to treat cancer."

Feb 25, 16

Skin cells could be the key to treating brain tumors, a team of scientists today revealed.
In a first for medical science, experts have transformed skin cells into cancer-hunting stem cells. And their experiments have shown they can be used to destroy tumors, known as glioblastoma. Their discovery could pave the way for new and more effective treatments for the disease - the first breakthrough in more than 30 years.

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