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07 Dec 10

ABSTRACT
The effect of layout in the comprehension of design pattern roles in UML class diagrams is assessed. This work replicates and extends a previous study using questionnaires but uses an eye tracker to gather additional data. The purpose of the replication is to gather more insight into the eye gaze behavior not evident from questionnaire-based methods. Similarities and differences between the studies are presented. Four design patterns are examined in two layout schemes in the context of three open source systems. Fifteen participants answered a series of eight design pattern role detection questions. Results show a significant improvement in role detection accuracy and visual effort with a certain layout for the Strategy and Observer patterns and a significant improvement in role detection time for all four patterns. Eye gaze data indicates classes participating in a design pattern act like visual beacons when they are in close physical proximity and follow the canonical layout, even though they violate some general graph aesthetics.

21 Jul 10

ABSTRACT
Eye-tracking equipment is used to assess how well a subject comprehends UML class diagrams. The results of a study are presented in which eye movements are captured in a non-obtrusive manner as users performed various comprehension tasks on UML class diagrams. The goal of the study is to identify specific characteristics of UML class diagrams, such as layout, color, and stereotype usage that are most effective for supporting a given task. Results indicate subjects have a variation in the eye movements (i.e., how the subjects navigate the diagram) depending on their UML expertise and software-design ability to solve the given task. Layouts with additional semantic information about the design were found to be most effective and the use of class stereotypes seems to play a substantial role in comprehension of these diagrams.

01 Dec 09

ABSTRACT
The paper advocates the use of eye movement measurements in
conducting empirical studies of software engineering tools,
especially visualization techniques. Traditionally, measures such
as accuracy and performance time have been used to assess and
compare different tools for a given set of tasks. These measures
are typically collected after the conclusion of an assigned task.
Eye tracking adds a new additional dimension to the assessment
arsenal by allowing access to the gaze activity of human subjects.
The gaze activities can be captured quite precisely while a task is
being performed. Thus, providing a unique opportunity to include
measures of how exactly human subjects use a tool and
ratiocinate their conclusions. A brief discussion on using the eye
movement measures for assessing UML class diagram layouts is
also presented.

01 Dec 09

Abstract
Eye-tracking equipment is used to assess how well a
subject comprehends UML class diagrams. The results
of a study are presented in which eye movements are
captured in a non-obtrusive manner as users performed
various comprehension tasks on UML class diagrams.
The goal of the study is to identify specific characteristics
of UML class diagrams, such as layout, color, and
stereotype usage that are most effective for supporting a
given task. Results indicate subjects have a variation in
the eye movements (i.e., how the subjects navigate the
diagram) depending on their UML expertise and
software-design ability to solve the given task. Layouts
with additional semantic information about the design
were found to be most effective and the use of class
stereotypes seems to play a substantial role in
comprehension of these diagrams.

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