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Sampler Consortium

Sampler Consortium's Public Library

about 8 hours ago

The Sampler Consortium announces two Sampler ID Days - one in RI and one in DE - both to occur on October 1, 2016 (10:00 am to 4:00 pm). As part of the Rhode Island Sampler Initiative, a Sampler ID Day will be held at the Babcock-Smith House Museum in Westerly, RI. It is the last of three Sampler ID Days funded by the Rhode Island Humanities Council (RICH) through a 2016 grant to support sampler identification, documentation, and photography in "South County" RI. The other Sampler ID Day will be held at the New Castle Historical Society in New Castle, DE. It is the most recent effort of the Delaware Sampler Initiative to locate, photograph, and document samplers in Delaware's public and private collections, in preparation for a forthcoming book on Delaware schoolgirl needlework by Gloria Seaman Allen. Both initiatives are supported by the Sampler Archive Project and resulting samplers will eventually appear online in its searchable database of American samplers that is currently under development. For more details, please see the flyers for these two Sampler ID Days posted on the Sampler Consortium website (scroll down to see both). The public is encouraged to bring in their American samplers to be photographed and documented at these two events – appointments recommended if bringing in more than three needlework objects.

about 8 hours ago

Article (April 5, 2016) by Sheryl De Jong on the National American History Museum blog about more than 400 blocks in the museum's collection used to stamp embroidery and braiding patterns on fabric. The blocks were donated to the museum by Edna Plummer in 1950, but were owned by her great grandmother Phebe (Smith) Norris (1804-1890) originally from Johnstown, NY but also a resident of Chicago, IL and San Jose, CA. Because it is unlikely she had such a large collection for her own use, it is possible she had a fancy goods store and used the blocks to stamp the designs on fabric for customers. The article includes a copy of a hand-colored ambrotype of Phebe Smith Norris from the Princeton Art Museum and images of embroidered fabrics that used similar blocks as patterns.

about 8 hours ago

The Concord Museum in Concord, MA recently acquired an embroidered memorial to Jane Burns Thoreau, grandmother of author Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862). Worked Elizabeth Thoreau (1782–1839) the piece includes the idealized figure of a woman in classical dress placing flowers on a tomb inscribed to her mother, Jane Thoreau, who died July 27, 1796, at age 42. The memorial to Jane Thoreau joins four other museum-owned works that descended in the Thatcher family. The reunited pieces, which date from the mid-18th century to the early 19th century, form a noteworthy record of the women of the extended Thoreau family. The memorial to Jane B. Thoreau and another to her husband John (possibly also the work of Elizabeth Thoreau) are the products of an as of yet unidentified Boston academy. The five objects are part of the the Thoreau Collection at Concord Museum which features more than 250 objects related to the author and his family. Artifacts include the desk on which Thoreau wrote "Civil Disobedience" and Walden plus some of earliest known photographs of Walden Pond. Photographs of all needlework mentioned are included with the online article.

about 9 hours ago

Announcing two lectures at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, NY by Paul D'Ambrosio, President and CEO. Lectures will focus on the museum's current exhibition entitled "The Instruction of Young Ladies: Arts from Private Girls’ Schools and Academies in Early America" (September 24 – December 31, 2016). Lecture will take place at the museum of October 12 and October 19, 2016, 12:30 - 2:30 pm and includes lunch. Advanced registration is required and the cost is $22 for NYSHA members, $25 non-members. If interested, call (607) 547-1461. Link to exhibition: http://www.fenimoreartmuseum.org/school-art .

Sep 30, 16

The Textile Society of America conference will take place October 19-23, 2016 in Savannah, GA at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Four members of the Sampler Consortium will conduct a panel session entitled “Schoolgirl Needlework Samplers: A Complex Narrative,” scheduled for October 21, 12:45 – 2:15 pm The focus of the session is on ways in which culture, religion, nationality, and trade have influenced schoolgirl needlework in four regions of the world: Norfolk, England (Joanne Lukacher); colonial Rhode Island (Lynn Tinley); the Georgia Low Country (Jenny Garwood); and the ethnically diverse Louisiana (Lynne Anderson). In addition, on Friday October 21 (3:15 – 4:45 pm) sampler scholar Kathy Staples will be hosting a field trip to Savannah’s St. Vincent’s Academy to see and learn about the needlework produced by some of its 19th century students. Conference registration is required.

Sep 30, 16

The History of Education Society’s annual meeting will be held November 3-6, 2016 in Providence, RI at the Renaissance Hotel downtown. Five members of the Sampler Consortium will host a panel session entitled “Revelations from Artifacts and Archives: Investigating Early Female Education in Rhode Island.” The focus of this session is on strategies for researching the educational opportunities and expectations for girls and young women in 18th and 19th century Rhode Island. Presenting will be: Lynn Tinley on 18th century RI samplers as educational artifacts; Sheryl DeJong on using archival newspapers to research RI’s early schools and teachers; Lynne Anderson on using both artifacts and archives to uncover Quaker schools and teachers in RI: and Blaire Gagnon on discoveries from the Rhode Island Sampler Initiative. Dr. Marla Miller, Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will be the panel’s discussant. The session will take place Friday, November ??, 2016. Conference registration is required.

Aug 14, 16

Article in the Westerly Sun newspaper (July 4, 2016) by Nancy Burns-Fusaro about the “South County Sampler Initiative”, newly funded by the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities. The goal of the initiative is to locate, photograph, and document schoolgirl samplers in the public and private collections of Washington County, Rhode Island (locally known as “South County”). The South County Sampler Initiative is directed by Jackie Brennan of the Babcock-Smith House Museum in Westerly, along with the South County Museum in Narragansett, and the University of Rhode Island in Kingstown. Funds will be used to support three Sampler ID Days (one at each site) where the public is invited to bring in their historic schoolgirl needlework for documentation and inclusion in the Sampler Archive Project. The first of the three Sampler ID Days was held on July 23 at the University of Rhode Island and volunteers documented approximately 50 samplers. Upcoming are two more Sampler ID Days, one at the South County Museum on August 27th and one at the Babcock-Smith House on October 1st. The article includes multiple images of samplers in the historic Babcock-Smith House Museum, including two samplers by Emeline Gallup. For a flyer advertising all three Sampler ID Days, please see the announcement at the Sampler Consortium website: http://samplerconsortium.org/index.html.

Aug 14, 16

Announcing an exhibition at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, NY entitled “The Instruction of Young Ladies: Arts from Private Girls' Schools and Academies in Early America” (September 24 – December 31, 2016). Curated by Robert Shaw, the exhibition will showcase the full range of schoolgirl and female academy work, while at the same time exploring the history of private female education in the United States, and the key role of women educators in the growth of this country’s educational system. On display will be samplers, mourning pieces, pictorial needlework (some combined with watercolor); painted boxes, tables and a violin; maps, penmanship drawings and exercises; watercolor theorems, landscapes and biblical and literary scenes; as well as needlework and theorem decorated reticules, fans, and pillows. The purpose is twofold; to show examples of schoolgirl work that rise to the level of art; and to put them, and the schools in which they were produced, into context in a way that shows their contribution to the world of American art. The three best known and most spectacular samplers in the exhibition are by Mary Antrim (1795-1884) of Burlington County, NJ; Mary B. Danforth (1807-1848) of Manchester, MA; and Caroline E. Bieber (1827 – 1885) of Kutztown, PA, stitched under the direction of Elizabeth B. Mason, (1797 – 1875). Objects in the exhibition are drawn from the Jane Katcher Collection of American Folk Art, and from the collections of the Fenimore Museum, DAR Museum, Henry Ford Museum, Historic Deerfield, the Long Island Museum, Maine Historical Society, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Shelburne Museum, Sturbridge Village, and the Yale University Art Gallery. A full color catalog of the exhibition is in production, with essays by both Robert Shaw and Jane Katcher. In addition, two lunchtime lectures by Paul D'Ambrosio, President and CEO, are scheduled for October 12 and October 19.

Aug 14, 16

Announcing the 2016 Winterthur Needlework Conference entitled "Embroidery: The Language of Art", scheduled for October 14 and 15, 2016. The conference offers a series of provocative lectures, innovative workshops, and tours that explore the connection of art and embroidery over four centuries, as well as women's roles as artists and their choice of embroidery as an artistic medium. Sampler Consortium members providing lectures during the two-day conference include Tricia Wilson Nguyen, speaking on the topic of "Professional vs Amateur: The Economics of Embroidery"; Susan Schoelwer speaking on the topic "Image and Identity in the New Republic: The Elusive Art of Silk Embroidery"; and Amelia Peck on "Candace Wheeler (1827-1923): Making Art Embroidery Work for Women". Optional field trips and classes include a trip to Westtown Boarding School hosted by Mary Uhl Brooks; and sampler classes offered by Joanne Harvey, Tricia Wilson Nguyen, Lynn Hulse, and Margriet Hogue. The conference complements an exhibition by the same name that looks at how the creation of embroidered objects fits into the changing definitions of art, craft, and design throughout the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Objects in the exhibition will be on display until January 7, 2017.

Aug 14, 16

In April M. Finkel and Daughter introduced their new online catalog, replacing the print version that has been published two times a year for decades. The online version of Samplings is free to everyone, and has a more interactive format. Users see the same gorgeous images and well researched text. In addition, however, they are able to enlarge, download, print, share, and search. The first issue is 80 pages in length and showcases the work of 38 girls, including three from Norfolk England. Ultimately, the plan is to electronically archive all 48 catalogs previously published in print, which will greatly enhance their use for reference and enable search across catalogs.

Aug 14, 16

On sale at Whitney Antiques - a full color catalog illustrating fifty samplers from their exhibition this summer (June 27 – July 17, 2016) entitled ‘Now While My Hands Are Thus Employed': Three Centuries of Historic Samplers. Samplers in the exhibition cut across all levels of society embracing both the affluent and the poor, and stood as testaments to the skill and perseverance of the young and the talent of their teachers. Whether worked with a view to future employment, for pleasure, or as preparation for being the mistress of household, the samplers on display illuminated the lives of girls and young women of the 17th, 18th, and the 19th centuries. Many of the historic pieces were from private collections, and all were for sale. Cost of the catalog is £18 plus shipping.

Mar 20, 16

Announcing an exhibition of schoolgirl samplers at the Pioneer Museum in Fredericksburg, TX beginning May 2 and ending July 30, 2016. The exhibit will showcase forty schoolgirl samplers and discuss their role in helping to teach reading, writing, math, and geography in early country schools. The exhibit has been organized by Evelyn Weinheimer and Jane Woellhof to support the 2016 Conference of the Country School Association of America (to be held June 19 - 22, 2016 at the museum) and is aligned with the conference theme "On the Land-Learning at Hand." Most of the 40 needlework objects on display are antique, including eight historic samplers from the Pioneer Museum's collection. These samplers bear the family names of early settlers to the area and have stimulated a genealogical search for their makers. Keynote speaker at the CSAA conference is Vicki LoPiccolo Jennet, Arizona needlewoman and author of "A Schoolroom Alphabet" (2014) and "Sonoran Borders: Threads of Friendship" (2013). The Pioneer Museum is open Monday through Saturday and there is a small admission fee.

Mar 20, 16

Announcing the 4th annual Penn Dry Goods Market antiques show, sale, exhibit, and lecture series May 13 and 14, 2016 – a fundraising event for the Schwenkfelder Library and Heritage Center in Pennsburg, PA. At least 24 dealers will be displaying their wares, including several known for having outstanding samplers in their inventory (e.g. Van Tassel Baumann Antiques, Neverbird Antiques, RSG Antiques, and Rose Berry). A number of sampler scholars will be speaking, including Kim Ivey on needlework from the early south; Dan & Marty Campanelli on New Jersey samplers, schools, and teachers; Sheryl De Jong on the history of American embroidery; Kathy Staples on six samplers in the pension files of the National Archives; Susan Schoelwer on the needlework of Martha Washington; and Kathy Lesieur on woolwork samplers of the Lehigh Valley. On exhibit will be the Schwenkfelder Townscape wool embroidered pictures, accompanied by artifacts depicted in the Townscapes. Advanced registration is recommended.

Mar 20, 16

Announcing a schoolgirl sampler exhibition at the Warren County Historical Society in Lebanon, Ohio. On display from March 1 to September 3, 2016 are a dozen 19th century samplers from Warren County, Ohio, including three newly discovered samplers from Waynesville School. According to Vicky Van Harlingen, Executive Director, the three Waynesville samplers are new to the historical society’s collection and are all well documented as to their origin. The Waynesville School was founded in 1802 by members of Ohio’s Miami Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, at one time the largest Quaker Monthly Meeting in the United States. Two of its earliest teachers were Elizabeth and Susan B. (Mrs. Jonathan) Wright who had been educated at Westtown School in PA. Samplers believed to have been stitched under their instruction include motifs and medallions typical of samplers stitched at other Quaker schools, including Westtown. The Warren County Historical Society is open daily Tuesday through Saturday and there is a small admission fee.

Mar 20, 16

Blog post on Winterthur Unreserved (February 25, 2016) discussing three schoolgirl embroideries in the Winterthur Museum collection that were stitched by African American girls. The first is a needlework picture by Rachel Ann Lee dated July 3, 1846 and worked at the Sisters of Providence School in Baltimore, MD. The second is an 1852 sampler made by Olevia Rebecca Parker at the Lombard Street School in Philadelphia. And the third is a verse sampler stitched by Mary D’Silver in 1793 at the Negro School in Philadelphia. Also known as the Negro Charity School, it was established in 1786 by Dr. Bray’s Associates, one of several attempts by the British-run philanthropic organization to open schools in America for African American children. Because the sampler was found in England it is assumed to have been a gift to one of the organization’s British benefactors. The verse on Mary’s sampler is from a 1773 poem by English poet Anna Laetitia (Aikin) Barbauld known as The Mouse’s Petition, and is a plea for compassion. The blog post contains family information about each of the three girls and images of their needlework.

Mar 20, 16

Online article (March 9, 2016) in the Young Witness, an Australian newspaper, about an 1826 sampler stitched by Elizabeth Sarah Witham in England when she 10 years old. Elizabeth married carpenter and laborer Henry Hobson and the couple migrated from London to Australia aboard the “Palestine”, arriving in Sydney on March 7, 1842. They eventually settled in Young, Australia and raised eight children. Elizabeth’s house and verse sampler was recently donated to the Young Lambing Flat Folk Museum, run by the Young Historical Society. It had been handed down through the family for generations and was donated in honor of Norma Campbell, believed to be a distant relative of Elizabeth’s and the last family member to own the sampler. On hand to receive the gift were some of Elizabeth’s many descendants and relatives living in the Young area.

Mar 03, 16

Announcing an exhibition of darning samplers and related needlework in the Constance Howard Gallery of Whitelands College, University of Roehampton (Jan. 19 – March 10, 2016). On display is a rare collection of needlework objects stitched by female students of Whitelands College, the first all-women teacher training college in England. The women were from working-class families and were training to teach in elementary schools for working-class children. Drawn from the college’s own collection, the objects focus on the production and repair of simple garments and household textiles. The centerpiece is an album compiled by Kate Stanley, Head Governess from 1876-1902, containing 26 darning samplers and 17 plain needlework samplers on which the stitching is extraordinarily fine. In addition, there are a number of loose samplers and a variety of small-scale practice garments, made as an economical and timesaving way to learn new techniques. Whitelands College had a reputation for training excellent teachers who excelled in the teaching of needlework, and graduates were hired to teach in schools and training colleges across the British Empire. Linked to the website announcement is a 12-page exhibition catalog called a “leaflet” that contains more information and excellent images of the objects on display.

Mar 03, 16

Announcing an exhibition in the Folk Art Gallery in the Peoria Riverfront Museum of quilts and samplers stitched by Midwestern girls and women. The exhibition opened Nov. 25, 2015 and will continue until March 20, 2016. Curated by Kristan McKinsey, all objects on display were drawn from the museum’s permanent collection, which includes a total of eight embroidered samplers. The exhibition showcases six of these samplers, one of which was acquired as a gift in 2015. The samplers on view date from 1831 to 1866 and five were stitched by girls known to have been living in Illinois. Two of the Illinois samplers were made in Peoria, both dated May 1866 and most likely stitched under the instruction of the same teacher. Other Illinois towns represented include Jacksonville in Morgan County (Sarah Allinson, 1849) and Burton in Adams County (Louisa Richards, 1855).

Mar 03, 16

Announcing a sampler exhibition in the Payne Hurd Gallery of the Allentown Art Museum in Allentown, PA. Curated by well-known sampler scholar Kathy Staples, the exhibition opened December 30, 2015 and will continue until May 29, 2016. Drawing from the important embroidery collections at the museum, the exhibition presents fifteen embroidered samplers and silkwork pictures stitched by Pennsylvania girls and young women. From elegant and exuberant to plain and neat, these embroideries reflect important aspects of the lives of their makers-their educational accomplishments, religious convictions, and ties of kinship. Among the objects on view are eight embroideries dating from 1802 to 1887, all of whose makers were related by blood or marriage to the their donor, Hope Randolph Hacker (1908-2002). On May 15 at 1:00 pm the museum will honor Ms. Hacker with a lecture by exhibition curator Kathy Staples entitled "Family Reunion: A Celebration of the Sampler Legacy of Hope Randolph Hacker." The museum's website announcement includes images of three samplers from the exhibition.

Mar 03, 16

Announcing a fall 2016 tour of museums and other sampler repositories throughout southern England led by Mary Hickmott, well-known needlework designer, teacher, and former publisher of the magazine ‘New Stitches’. The two-week tour begins September 22 and ends October 5, 2016. The tour will start at Heathrow Airport and include visits to see samplers and other needlework objects in the following collections: Muller House Museum in Bristol, Gloucester Folk Museum, Somerset County Museum, Wells Museum, Fashion Museum, Montacute House, Georgian House Museum, Ashmolean Museum, Fitzwilliam Museum, Guildford Museum, Maidstone Museum, Whitney Antiques, Royal School of Needlework, and the Victoria and Albert Museum, where there is also a special exhibition of English medieval embroidery known as Opus Anglicanum. Although not mentioned in this post, the tour will also include a morning at the home of Michael and Elizabeth Feller to meet them and view their collection, including 16th and 17th century embroidery such as stumpwork and blackwork as well as more recent samplers. The price for the tour is £2290 per person and includes four-star hotels with breakfast and dinner every day, all travel and all entrance fees to museums and historic houses, as well as special talks given by experts in their field. Booking is online.

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