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Heather Edick

Heather Edick's Public Library

  • Modify a curricular element only when (1) you see a student need and (2) you are convinced that modification  increases the likelihood that the learner will understand important ideas and use important skills more thoroughly as a result.
  • It is crucial, then, for teachers to articulate what's essential for learners to recall, understand, and be able to do in a given domain.
  • essential concepts, principles, and skills of each subject

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  • The problem is that we frame data as an entity teachers need to meet and engage with, rather than as information that rises organically out of teachers' work with learners. When teachers don't embrace an idea or mandate, it's often because they feel overburdened: They don't see the time or need for a new professional love interest. There must always be a point to what administrators ask teachers to do with data.
Mar 20, 16

Effective Instructional Strategies Supporting Classroom Instruction

  • For example, building a richenvironment for inquiry involves an understanding of literacy, of problem- and project-basedlearning, of critical and creative thinking skills, of problem solving techniques and constructivist© 2008 Pennsylvania Department of Education. All Rights Reserved. Some material adapted with permission from Digital Immigrants, Digital Natives, © Mark Prensky. www.marcprensky.com learning theory.
  • technology tools, but who are working to “learn the language” and to communicate effectively withthe natives around them. Some of the immigrants are open and accepting of “native ways,” butmany are resistant to change.The Refugees: Older adults in society who have chosen to flee from – rather than integrate into –the native culture. They may actively work against the goals and interests of both the digitalnatives and the digital immigrants. The refugees are primarily motivated by fear and a staunchdesire not only to resist change but to actively oppose it, to deny the existence of a changedenvironment, and/or to ignore it.The Bridges: The digital bridges are neither truly natives nor fully digital immigrants. Likemillenials, who have one foot in each century, the bridges have both native and immigrant traits.As a result, digital bridges are able to communicate relatively effectively with both groups.The Undecided: These people have not made up their minds about which group they fit into, orwhich group they want to fit into. They are likely immigrants or refugees, but may not have takensufficient action to reveal their identities and/or preferences for group identity.But does this oversimplification give teachers an excuse to not master these pervasive tools as ameans for engaging the students they teach? David Warlick blogs about digital natives and digitalimmigrants and warns educators not to let our immigrant condition limit us as we move forward inlearning how to speak in a digital tongue our students will understand.“But I believe that it is time that we stop hiding behind our immigrant status and start acting likenatives. We need to stop making excuses and start leading. We are teachers, after all. It’s our jobto lead, not follow. Sure, we’ll never be able to keep up with our kids in lots of ways. They havethe luxury of time, and their brain cells are fresher. But it is our job to look into the future and thento plan and lead the way for our children” (Warlick, 2006).Christopher Dede, Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies at Harvard GraduateSchool of Education, argues that using these labels can lead to overgeneralizations: “Don’t startwith the technology, when you start with technology, it’s a solution looking for a problem.” Dedestarts, instead, with learning styles. “No matter what age you are, your learning style can beshaped by the kind of media you use.” Dede suggests that age may not be the determining factorof how seamlessly we use the tools of the 21st Century. For example, those who have amedia-based learning style synthesize and process experiences rather than information,regardless of their age. They learn best when taught actively, through collaborations both onlineand in the real world.Last generationThe rapid changes taking place in this digital world are just beginning. One of the clear indicatorsof natives and immigrants will not simply be a question of age, but rather of the instinctiveacceptance of rapid technological change. We may very well be the last generation of educatorswho has the prerogative of deciding whether or no
  • technology tools, but who are working to “learn the language” and to communicate effectively withthe natives around them. Some of the immigrants are open and accepting of “native ways,” butmany are resistant to change.The Refugees: Older adults in society who have chosen to flee from – rather than integrate into –the native culture. They may actively work against the goals and interests of both the digitalnatives and the digital immigrants. The refugees are primarily motivated by fear and a staunchdesire not only to resist change but to actively oppose it, to deny the existence of a changedenvironment, and/or to ignore it.The Bridges: The digital bridges are neither truly natives nor fully digital immigrants. Likemillenials, who have one foot in each century, the bridges have both native and immigrant traits.As a result, digital bridges are able to communicate relatively effectively with both groups.The Undecided: These people have not made up their minds about which group they fit into, orwhich group they want to fit into. They are likely immigrants or refugees, but may not have takensufficient action to reveal their identities and/or preferences for group identity.But does this oversimplification give teachers an excuse to not master these pervasive tools as ameans for engaging the students they teach? David Warlick blogs about digital natives and digitalimmigrants and warns educators not to let our immigrant condition limit us as we move forward inlearning how to speak in a digital tongue our students will understand.“But I believe that it is time that we stop hiding behind our immigrant status and start acting likenatives. We need to stop making excuses and start leading. We are teachers, after all. It’s our jobto lead, not follow. Sure, we’ll never be able to keep up with our kids in lots of ways. They havethe luxury of time, and their brain cells are fresher. But it is our job to look into the future and thento plan and lead the way for our children” (Warlick, 2006).Christopher Dede, Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies at Harvard GraduateSchool of Education, argues that using these labels can lead to overgeneralizations: “Don’t startwith the technology, when you start with technology, it’s a solution looking for a problem.” Dedestarts, instead, with learning styles. “No matter what age you are, your learning style can beshaped by the kind of media you use.” Dede suggests that age may not be the determining factorof how seamlessly we use the tools of the 21st Century. For example, those who have amedia-based learning style synthesize and process experiences rather than information,regardless of their age. They learn best when taught actively, through collaborations both onlineand in the real world.Last generationThe rapid changes taking place in this digital world are just beginning. One of the clear indicatorsof natives and immigrants will not simply be a question of age, but rather of the instinctiveacceptance of rapid technological change. We may very well be the last generation of educatorswho has the prerogative of deciding whether or n

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