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Mike McBride

Mike McBride's Public Library

about 1 hour ago

I have often wondered as I spend hours on airplanes how come attendants don't have individual information about you already. You have an assigned seat, when you scan your boarding pass, they know it's you and address you by name, so why is it that once I'm on the plane, no one has any idea.

Think if the efficiency that could be driven this way. I could have preferences saved for meals, drinks, etc. Stored credit card information for making in-flight purchases, or the data could be used to quickly identify someone with medical training, or emergency response training.

As long as it's only storing data I'm already providing as part of the mileage program, why not use that data on the plane too?

about 1 hour ago

"Multiple stressors in the child’s family and community context, and social and cultural attitudes that shame and blame victims, can create environments in which disclosure is fraught with difficulty. The process of disclosure often involves behavioural and indirect cues, and accidental disclosures, as much or more often than a conscious decision to tell someone about the abuse.


Rolf Harris' offences took place between 1968 and 1986 – but only in 2014 was he jailed. EPA/Andy Rain
It is often assumed that disclosing abuse is naturally in the interest of victims. However, children may withhold disclosure because they accurately believe that the adults in their life will be angry with them or not support them.

Research with adult survivors has found that many did disclose in childhood only to experience blame and minimisation. Abuse may then continue in spite of the disclosure.

Negative and shaming reactions to sexual abuse disclosures have been shown to significantly increase the risk of mental illness and distress in the victim. Feeling betrayed is corrosive to mental wellbeing."

about 1 hour ago

Great book review by Amy and Mel! The review itself makes for some interesting reading about how survivors are bonded to their abuser, and how it can be important to understand that the abuser is doing things because of their own problems, not because the child is deserving.

Have you read this book? What did you think of it?

about 2 hours ago

It's always good to have programs that teach children how to be safe onoine or off, yet not scare them away from everything.

about 7 hours ago

"To be clear, the athletic department cannot be trusted. An internal memo details the department’s fears that graduation rates will drop should public administration no longer be offered. Instead of saying, “If our players are congregating around one not-that-popular major and we realize it is one of the only ones they can pass, we have completely failed them,” the people in charge said, “Man, we gotta save that major.”

Then they offered money to keep it going. That money wasn’t accepted, but it should be the last reminder we need that it’s far past time to stop pretending that big-time football and academics are working in harmony."

To be fair, this investigation is at Auburn, but it could easily be the same at most big-time college football programs. They are big business, and at best a money-making arm of an actual academic institution.

about 23 hours ago

Some of these aren't that simple to be honest. On the other hand, if we could tech people to properly backup their stuff, protect themselves from malware, and keep their information private, we'd go a long way towards making using a computer less painful.

So, take a look and see which of these tips could save you some day.

For the techie folks out there, what would your top ten list look like?

about 23 hours ago

Generally speaking, I like the idea. Where it falls flat for me is when someone sends me their travel itinerary so that I know their coming and goings, and Google adds the trip to my calendar.

If they can get a filter for that sort of thing, that would be great. Are you listening Google?

Aug 26, 15

Darn, now they're going to expect me to answer emails on the plane too. There goes my one chance for being unplugged! ;-)

Aug 26, 15

"There’s a common assumption that children subjected to abuse or trauma will have problematic emotions across the board, McLaughlin said, such as muted responses to positive situations and extreme reactions to negative ones. But the study’s findings suggest that maltreated children are perhaps more resilient and adaptable than previously thought.

“It seems that they are able to cope effectively, even in very stimulating emotional situations, if they’re taught strategies for doing so,” she said. “We think the findings are really promising.”"

Unfortunately, many survivors go their whole lives not realizing that there is hope, if only they can get the help necessary. This study shows that you can be taught the skills necessary to overcome abuse, but so many simply don't think there is any hope of that. If you've been one of them, please recognize that healing is possible!

Aug 25, 15

I think Bobbi misses one of the reasons society continues to believe these myths. I've written about it elsewhere, our natural instinct to find a reason to believe that it won't happen to us, or won't be as damaging if it should happen. Thus, we keep our kids away from strange, anti-social, men, and we convince ourselves that our stability, our religion, or our wealth, will protect us from the really harmful abusers, and the kinds of abuse that might occur outside of those "stereotypes" aren't really that damaging.

None of which is true at all.

Aug 24, 15

Really, what else is there to say? Working long hours may make us feel important, but it doesn't help us do better work. A lack of sleep absolutely affects out ability to make good decisions, do quality work and a host of other things.

Just stop it.

Aug 23, 15

Like youth sports, boarding schools, or youth religious groups, anywhere you have the combination of adults with power and control over children, you're going to have predators attempting to use that power and control to abuse children. Add to it the money and glamour of Hollywood child actors, and there isn't even a question that some would try and take advantage of this.

This is why these groups need to be ever vigilant to protecting children, and parents who get their kids involved in these sorts of activities need to have open communication with their kids about what is really happening instead of letting their own ambitions for their kids dominate their decision making.

By all means, let your kids chase their dreams and engage in sports, acting, whatever, but don't lose sight of the fact that they are children.

Aug 23, 15

Some of them apply to women as well, but I think it is vital to understand that men get depression, and that asking for help is not a sign of "weakness".

This is how we end up with a ridiculously high number of suicides among men, when society tells us it's not OK to ask for help, and your only choices are to deal with depression without any hope of recovery, or be mocked because you aren't a real man. It's easy to see why you'd opt for a way out of that choice, but that is not the truth.

Aug 23, 15

This is profoundly sad, and somewhat shocking, because there simply are no resources available to treat mental illness.

Aug 23, 15

You know what? They make a valid point. If a professional athlete sitting in the dugout and paying attention to the game can't react fast enough to avoid getting hit, what chance does a fan sitting right behind the dugout have? As much as we all like the chance at catching a foul ball, or not having to watch the game through netting, Gose's comments have me thinking entirely differently about this. Let's get some fan protection in there.

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