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Joseph Kraus

Joseph Kraus's Public Library

17 Apr 14

"Newsreel archive British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of 85,000 historic films, in high resolution, to its YouTube channel. This unprecedented release of vintage news reports and cinemagazines is part of a drive to make the archive more accessible to viewers all over the world.

“Our hope is that everyone, everywhere who has a computer will see these films and enjoy them,” says Alastair White, General Manager of British Pathé. “This archive is a treasure trove unrivalled in historical and cultural significance that should never be forgotten. Uploading the films to YouTube seemed like the best way to make sure of that.”"

17 Apr 14

"I've finally had a chance to read through the draft framework from ACRL, for Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (ILCSHE), as well as some good blog posts reflecting on the draft from Barbara Fister, Jacob Berg, and Andy Burkhardt. After attending ACRL Immersion - Program Track this last summer and also recently reading Susanna Cowan's, "Information literacy: The battle won won that we lost?" it seems like at least the existentialist part of the conversation on information literacy has been brewing for quite awhile. Cowan asks, "at what point does trying to interrupt the research process with the intrusion of instruction sessions, consultations, and tutorials become anachronistic, out of touch, and eventually irrelevant?" (2014, p. 29). And quoting Sugata Mitra, Cowan says we should "let learning happen," instead of essentially forcing/inserting ourselves into the process (p. 30). So the question then it seems many of us are asking ourselves is what does "information literacy" (IL) really mean, and if librarians don't "own" information literacy, what will our role be?"

17 Apr 14

"Today marks the launch of another report on open access, a topic area that is rapidly becoming saturated. The latest document, funded by the Higher Education Funding Council of England (Hefce) and overseen by the British Academy, specifically focuses on the humanities and social sciences in an international environment. The conclusions are fairly clear:

• Hefce's "green" open access recommendations (research accessed via digital repositories) – with up to 24 month embargoes and allowances for exemptions – meet with approval.

• Research Councils UK (RCUK) is unrealistic and its policies, we are told, "pose serious dangers for the international standing of UK research in the humanities".

While such work is welcome, it must be stressed that there are also
some problems with the research here. The most notable problem is the
fact that the researchers destroyed datasets in order to preserve
commercial confidentiality. Nobody can, therefore, check these findings
and they must be treated with caution. "

17 Apr 14

"BACKGROUND The scholarly publishing paradigm is evolving to embrace innovative open access publication models. While this environment fosters the creation of high-quality, peer-reviewed open access publications, it also provides opportunities for journals or publishers to engage in unprofessional or unethical practices. LITERATURE REVIEW Faculty take into account a number of factors in deciding where to publish, including whether or not a journal engages in ethical publishing practices. Librarians and scholars have attempted to address this issue in a number of ways, such as generating lists of ethical/unethical publishers and general guides. DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT In response to growing faculty concern in this area, the Grand Valley State University Libraries developed and evaluated a set of Open Access Journal Quality Indicators that support faculty in their effort to identify the characteristics of ethical and unethical open access publications. NEXT STEPS Liaison librarians have already begun using the Indicators as a catalyst in sparking conversation around open access publishing and scholarship. Going forward, the Libraries will continue to evaluate and gather feedback on the Indicators, taking into account emerging trends and practices."

17 Apr 14

"The long-held but erroneous assumption of never-ending rapid growth in biomedical science has created an unsustainable hypercompetitive system that is discouraging even the most outstanding prospective students from entering our profession—and making it difficult for seasoned investigators to produce their best work. This is a recipe for long-term decline, and the problems cannot be solved with simplistic approaches. Instead, it is time to confront the dangers at hand and rethink some fundamental features of the US biomedical research ecosystem. "

15 Apr 14

"The Science as an open enterprise report highlights the need to grapple with the huge deluge of data created by modern technologies in order to preserve the principle of openness and to exploit data in ways that have the potential to create a second open science revolution.

Exploring massive amounts of data using modern digital technologies has enormous potential for science and its application in public policy and business. The report maps out the changes that are required by scientists, their institutions and those that fund and support science if this potential is to be realised.
Areas for action

Six key areas for action are highlighted in the report:

Scientists need to be more open among themselves and with the public and media
Greater recognition needs to be given to the value of data gathering, analysis and communication
Common standards for sharing information are required to make it widely usable
Publishing data in a reusable form to support findings must be mandatory
More experts in managing and supporting the use of digital data are required
New software tools need to be developed to analyse the growing amount of data being gathered"

15 Apr 14

"Literature citation analysis plays a very important role in bibliometrics and scientometrics, such as the Science Citation Index (SCI) impact factor, h-index. Existing citation analysis methods assume that all citations in a paper are equally important, and they simply count the number of citations. Here we argue that the citations in a paper are not equally important and some citations are more important than the others. We use a strength value to assess the importance of each citation and propose to use the regression method with a few useful features for automatically estimating the strength value of each citation. Evaluation results on a manually labeled data set in the computer science field show that the estimated values can achieve good correlation with human-labeled values. We further apply the estimated citation strength values for evaluating paper influence and author influence, and the preliminary evaluation results demonstrate the usefulness of the citation strength values."

15 Apr 14

"Evaluating the performance of collaborative information seeking (CIS) systems and users can be challenging, often more so than individual information-seeking environments. This can be attributed to the complex and dynamic interactions that take place among various users and systems processes in a CIS environment. While some of the aspects of a CIS system or user could be measured by typical assessment techniques from single-user information retrieval/seeking (IR/IS), one often needs to go beyond them to provide a meaningful evaluation, helping to provide not only a sense of performance, but also insights into design decisions (regarding systems) and behavioural trends (regarding users). This article first provides an overview of existing methods and techniques for evaluating CIS (synthesis). It then extracts valuable directives and advice from the literature that inform evaluation choices (suggestions). Finally, the article presents a framework for CIS evaluation with two major parts: system-based and user-based (structure). The proposed framework incorporates various instruments taken from computer and social sciences literature as applicable to CIS evaluations. The lessons from the literature and the framework could serve as important starting points for designing experiments and systems, as well as evaluating system and user performances in CIS and related research areas."

15 Apr 14

"
A focus group study of fourteen University of Saskatchewan second to fourth year humanities and social science undergraduate students was conducted in the fall of 2011. The purpose of the research was to determine how students learn about library resources and services. Findings indicate that the participants often use a variety of informal, self-directed and information sharing strategies. Seeking help from professors, peers, friends, and family members is a common practice. Convenience, familiarity, and perceived knowledge are key factors that determine who and how these students learn about the library. Formal instruction and seeking assistance from librarians did not resonate for participants as a typical approach for learning about the library.

The author suggests that undergraduate students engage in informal learning and information sharing as many ‘adult learners’ do, similar to an employment setting. The library, within the formal educational structure, lends itself to a more informal learning context. The study concludes that libraries must continue to develop resources, services, and innovative programs that support students’ informal learning styles, while also providing formal instruction as part of the undergraduate curriculum ensuring students are exposed early on to core foundational skills that contribute to their success as informal and self-directed learners."

15 Apr 14

"In 2011, Colorado State University (CSU) developed a relationship with INTO UK, a recruitment agency, to increase the number of enrolled international students on campus and further internationalize the campus and curriculum. To ensure that library service and resource quality would not be negatively affected, the CSU Libraries decided to explore potential impacts. We approached library personnel, numerous CSU campus units, and the two previous US INTO campuses (Oregon State University and University of South Florida) for focused interviews asking, 'How can the Libraries contribute to the INTO partnership to ensure overall student success?' It became clear that continued outreach and collaboration are necessary given the complex university environment to support student success and that addressing service gaps with the increased international student population would benefit the campus overall."

15 Apr 14

"Traditional, subscription-based scientific publishing has its limitations: often, articles are inaccessible to the majority of researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where journal subscriptions or one-time access fees are cost-prohibitive. Open access (OA) publishing, in which journals provide online access to articles free of charge, breaks this barrier and allows unrestricted access to scientific and scholarly information to researchers all over the globe. At the same time, one major limitation to OA is a high publishing cost that is placed on authors. Following recent developments to OA publishing policies in the UK and even LMICs, this article highlights the current status and future challenges of OA in Africa. We place particular emphasis on Kenya, where multidisciplinary efforts to improve access have been established. We note that these efforts in Kenya can be further strengthened and potentially replicated in other African countries, with the goal of elevating the visibility of African research and improving access for African researchers to global research, and, ultimately, bring social and economic benefits to the region. We (1) offer recommendations for overcoming the challenges of implementing OA in Africa and (2) call for urgent action by African governments to follow the suit of high-income countries like the UK and Australia, mandating OA for publicly-funded research in their region and supporting future research into how OA might bring social and economic benefits to Africa. "

11 Apr 14

"The table above provides average rates of citation by field for journal articles indexed by Thomson Reuters in its Essential Science Indicators database from 2000 to 2010. The statistics provided in ESI are restricted to items coded as regular articles and reviews. The columns represent the publication year of the journal articles while the rows designate broad field areas, defined by sets of journal. In ESI, papers in multidisciplinary journals are selectively assigned to their appropriate fields. The citation counts used to calculate these averages are from the year of publication to the end of 2010. Thus, older papers have had more time to collect citations than newer ones and show higher values. As one reads the chart from left to right, therefore, the citation averages decline. The righthand column provides the field average based on 2000-2010 papers cited over the entire 11-year period. Typically, the 11-year average is approximately half that for papers from 2000 cited from that year to 2010. The fields are ranked by the 2000-10 citation averages."

11 Apr 14

"Clifford Lynch (CNI) points to a new report from JISC (the UK’s Joint Information Systems Committee) that summarizes key finding from recent studies on research data services. The Value and Impact of Data Curation and Sharing: A Synthesis of Three Recent Studies of UK Research Data Centres [pdf] (Neal Beagrie and John Houghton) draws on studies of the Economic and Social Data Service (ESDS), the Archaeology Data Service (ADS), and the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC).

The press release states:

The data centre studies combined quantitative and qualitative approaches in order to quantify value in economic terms and present other, non-economic, impacts and benefits. Uniquely, the studies cover both users and depositors of data, and we believe the surveys of depositors undertaken are the first of their kind. All three studies show a similar pattern of findings, with data sharing via the data centres having a large measurable impact on research efficiency and on return on investment in the data and services."

11 Apr 14

"The Wellcome Trust strengthened their open access policy last year and now withhold part of the grant available to authors until they comply with the new approach.

This is because open access increases the impact of the biomedical and health research that Wellcome funds, which can only be a good thing. From the next Research Excellence Framework (REF) onwards, the same link between open access and research funding will be cemented throughout UK higher education, for pretty much the same reason.

Research funders across the world now broadly agree that they will get the most value from their investments by stipulating that the outputs from research are openly available for others to use - both within universities and beyond. There are different emphases: on straightforward access to publications; on re-use rights; on the importance of competition and lower prices for journals; on embargo lengths where no payment is made to the journal. However the direction is clear, this change is now irrevocable."

11 Apr 14

"Library directors at selective liberal arts colleges may this fall found a new open-access publishing house. In the months ahead, the libraries still need to convince faculty members the effort would be worth the time and money."

10 Apr 14

"For years, two of the world’s largest research funders — the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Wellcome Trust in the United Kingdom — have issued a steady stream of incentives to coax academics to abide by their open-access policies.

Now they are done with just dangling carrots. Both institutions are bringing out the sticks: cautiously and discreetly cracking down on researchers who do not make their papers publicly available."

10 Apr 14

"For scientists around the world, the open access movement has radically changed how journal articles are read and distributed by offering an alternative to the dominant subscription-based access model. Today, anyone can access at least some scientific articles on the web. In this three-part series, we examine the impact of open access journals on the scientific publishing industry."

08 Apr 14

"With the advancement of open access (OA) journal publishing opportunities in partnership with presses and faculty, libraries in alignment with intersecting academic values are fulfilling a need by supporting sustainable models of scholarly communication that incorporate disseminating faculty scholarship in collaboration with library and/or press staff and editors to “start up” an OA journal or transform an existing print journal to OA. Library staff that embrace faculty or student publishing partnerships are structuring and utilizing their scholarly communication skill sets by positioning the availability of open access publications to disseminate quality research results. University presses are also forging alliances with libraries to strategically align their business models as an economically viable solution and compelling competitor in publishing journals. The peer-reviewed OA journal model actuates library publishing activities with the goals of making research globally visible, the ability to build upon others’ work, and uphold the scholarly communication practices of researchers and publishers that might include stakeholder ways in: supporting the faculty research cycle; hosting software and tools’ training; metadata creation; database indexing; Creative Commons licensing; reducing libraries’ purchasing costs; engaging altmetrics; and economic viability. My infographic poster will visually depict various stakeholder alignments in publishing OA journals."

08 Apr 14

"Training the 21st Century Library Leader provides an analysis of library leadership training in the U.S. context. It documents the models and features, geographic locations, sectors and audiences, funding and costs, founders and hosts, and evaluation methodologies deployed by more than seventy library leadership training programs during the last 15 years.

Training the 21st Century Library Leader is the first deliverable of the Nexus Project, a planning project funded by the IMLS to evaluate the current state of library leadership programs and recommend cross-sector synergies and opportunities."

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