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Neil Movold

Neil Movold's Public Library

Aug 26, 16

"Cognitive computing has gained prominence as a major disrupter by enabling computers to interact with people in human-like ways. These systems understand and communicate in natural language, and leverage artificial intelligence to present new insights that far surpass those gleaned by human intelligence alone.

At the forefront of this technology, and cited by the 2016 Tech Trends report as the single most important innovator to watch, is IBM Watson.

With cognitive systems like Watson, we are now able to unlock the value in data that was previously inaccessible because it existed in an unstructured format or was dispersed in any number of separate silos. Cognitive systems think more like humans, at immense scale, which redefines what is possible to discover and to do. Over time, these new technologies will serve to transform jobs, businesses, customer experiences and entire industries."

  • Cognitive computing has gained prominence as a major disrupter by enabling computers to interact with people in human-like ways. These systems understand and communicate in natural language, and leverage artificial intelligence to present new insights that far surpass those gleaned by human intelligence alone.

     

    At the forefront of this technology, and cited by the 2016 Tech Trends report as the single most important innovator to watch, is IBM Watson.

     

    With cognitive systems like Watson, we are now able to unlock the value in data that was previously inaccessible because it existed in an unstructured format or was dispersed in any number of separate silos. Cognitive systems think more like humans, at immense scale, which redefines what is possible to discover and to do. Over time, these new technologies will serve to transform jobs, businesses, customer experiences and entire industries.

  • However, human decision-making is subject to numerous cognitive biases that can easily distort judgement. For example, iconoclastic author Tom Peters highlights 159 cognitive biases that impact management decision-making (Peters, Tom. “159 Cognitive Biases Between You and Good Judgment (Good Luck!).” 29 May 2014). Emotions such as anxiety, fear or anger could easily cloud a person’s judgement. Human thinking is prone to the use of cognitive heuristics, a shortcut that may lead to biases and faulty decisions.
Aug 26, 16

"Cognitive computing will usher in a new wave of change, giving organisations the power to gain insights and make decisions from vast amounts of data. Over the next 12 to 18 months these new systems will begin to replace the programmable computers we have known since the 1940s. Instead they will use natural language recognition and machine learning to discover new insights from vast amounts of unstructured data, at a speed never before possible."

  • Cognitive computing will usher in a new wave of change, giving organisations the power to gain insights and make decisions from vast amounts of data. Over the next 12 to 18 months these new systems will begin to replace the programmable computers we have known since the 1940s. Instead they will use natural language recognition and machine learning to discover new insights from vast amounts of unstructured data, at a speed never before possible.
  • “In education we will have personalised education. At some time in the future, you will have a system that follows you for life and knows what you know and what you need to know and the gaps in your knowledge. It knows how you learn and how to help you understand and get up to speed on any new topic you need to know; you will have the sort of one-to-one education that we can only hope to have today.”
  • Walsh says IBM’s use of the term “augmenting” is a sensible move since artificial intelligence bristles with emotional baggage. “That will be how we protect people’s jobs and give a good outcome for people, and not just have wealth concentrated in the hands of the owners of the robots,” he says.

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Aug 26, 16

"Who we are: academic and industrial researchers, practitioners, software developers, end users, and students.

What we do:

Promote and support the growth and application of AI principles and techniques throughout computing
Sponsor or co-sponsor high-quality, AI-related conferences
Organize the Career Network and Conference (SIGAI CNC) for early-stage researchers in AI
Sponsor recognized AI awards
Support important journals in the field
Provide scholarships to student members to attend conferences
Promote AI education and publications through various forums and the ACM digital library"

Aug 26, 16

"UX innovator discusses what forward-thinking schools are doing now, and what AI in education will look like in the near future."

Aug 25, 16

"By sifting through recent articles, guides, top ten lists, and infographics written by experts around the web, we've distilled the Top 3 pieces of advice that entrepreneurs need to know on a key topic. "

  • By sifting through recent articles, guides, top ten lists, and infographics written by experts around the web, we've distilled the Top 3 pieces of advice that entrepreneurs need to know on a key topic. 
Aug 25, 16

"It's summertime, but that doesn't mean we don't feel stressed. In fact, some of us might feel even more winded having to carry the extra workload of people who are out on two-week vacations to the south of France. An entrepreneur I know said he'd just gone through the most stressful period of the year trying to raise money while every investor seemed to be out of town. "I’ll never do that again," he said.

Whatever is causing you stress, you don't need to let it ruin your day or your life. Here are five ways successful people deal with everyday aggravations:"

  • Whatever is causing you stress, you don't need to let it ruin your day or your life. Here are five ways successful people deal with everyday aggravations:

     

    1. Do the hard stuff first.

  • Self service has become one the most lucrative marketing campaigns of the last few years in the realms of business intelligence (BI) and analytics, second only to Big Data. Every vendor in the BI and analytics space makes this claim, with perhaps no exception. Self-service data sensemaking, however, is an example of false advertising that’s producing a great deal of harm. How many bad decisions are being made based on specious analytical findings by unskilled people in organizations that accept the self-service myth? More bad decisions than good, I fear.
  • Some software vendors frame their products as self service out of ignorance: they don’t understand data sensemaking and therefore don’t understand that self service doesn’t apply.
  • The few software vendors that understand data sensemaking frame their products as self service because the deceit produces sales, resulting in revenues.

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  • Self service has become one the most lucrative marketing campaigns of the last few years in the realms of business intelligence (BI) and analytics, second only to Big Data. Every vendor in the BI and analytics space makes this claim, with perhaps no exception. Self-service data sensemaking, however, is an example of false advertising that’s producing a great deal of harm. How many bad decisions are being made based on specious analytical findings by unskilled people in organizations that accept the self-service myth? More bad decisions than good, I fear.

  • Cognitive computing has the potential to reshape how work gets done, how businesses grow, and how markets and industries evolve by delivering automated, evidence-based responses that drive better outcomes. Learn how Deloitte is focused on using cognitive computing as a positive disruptor.
  • says Mike Rhodin, SVP, IBM Watson Group. Deloitte currently serves IBM as a client in 45 countries.
Aug 22, 16

"e theory of disruptive innovation, introduced in these pages in 1995, has proved to be a powerful way of thinking about innovation-driven growth. Many leaders of small, entrepreneurial companies praise it as their guiding star; so do many executives at large, well-established organizations, including Intel, Southern New Hampshire University, and Salesforce.com.

Unfortunately, disruption theory is in danger of becoming a victim of its own success. Despite broad dissemination, the theory’s core concepts have been widely misunderstood and its basic tenets frequently misapplied. Furthermore, essential refinements in the theory over the past 20 years appear to have been overshadowed by the popularity of the initial formulation. As a result, the theory is sometimes criticized for shortcomings that have already been addressed.

There’s another troubling concern: In our experience, too many people who speak of “disruption” have not read a serious book or article on the subject. Too frequently, they use the term loosely to invoke the concept of innovation in support of whatever it is they wish to do. Many researchers, writers, and consultants use “disruptive innovation” to describe any situation in which an industry is shaken up and previously successful incumbents stumble. But that’s much too broad a usage.

The problem with conflating a disruptive innovation with any breakthrough that changes an industry’s competitive patterns is that different types of innovation require different strategic approaches. To put it another way, the lessons we’ve learned about succeeding as a disruptive innovator (or defending against a disruptive challenger) will not apply to every company in a shifting market. If we get sloppy with our labels or fail to integrate insights from subsequent research and experience into the original theory, then managers may end up using the wrong tools for their context, reducing their chances of success. Over time, the theory’s usefulness will be undermined."

  • Let’s call the first area of impact economic paradigm shifts. Three of our disruptive scenarios above fall into this category: the sharing, maker, and circular economy.
Aug 19, 16

"What is collaboration? In Let’s Stop Confusing Cooperation and Teamwork with Collaboration, I define collaboration as “two or more people working together to create something new in support of their shared vision.”
Collaboration is different from cooperation or coordination in that you collaborate around a shared vision, and something new is created as a result of your joint effort.
Is collaboration a problem-solving technique?    . . . Yes. It can lead to break-through solutions.
Is collaboration a tool for innovation?   . . . Yes. It can lead to creative ideas that lead to pivotal changes.
Is collaboration an attribute of organizational culture?   . . . Yes. It can describe organizations where people effectively work across boundaries to produce spectacular results.
Collaboration is all of these – a technique, a tool, and an attribute – and you can find many articles and books telling you how to use collaboration for problem-solving, for innovation and creative, and how to embed it in an organization’s culture. But unfortunately, too often, the advice does not increase collaboration."

  • One way of thinking of learner agency is when learners have “the power to act”. Agency is when learning involves the activity and the initiative of the learner, more than the inputs that are transmitted to the learner from the teacher, from the curriculum, the resources and so forth.
  • There are three things that I think are core features of our understanding of learner agency. The first is that agency involves the initiative or self-regulation of the learner. Before a learner can exercise agency in their particular learning context they must have a belief that their behaviour and their approach to learning is actually going to make a difference for them in the learning in that setting - in other words, a personal sense of agency. The notion of agency isn’t simply about handing control over to the learner - a sort of abdication model - it involves a far greater tapestry of intentionality on the part of schools and teachers to create that context and environment where the learners are actively involved in the moment by moment learning and well being.  However, it will be important for schools to consider the safeguards that will need to be in place to ensure no one is falling through the gaps under the guise of just “doing my own thing”.

     

    Second, agency is interdependent. It mediates and is mediated by the sociocultural context of the classroom. It’s not just about a learner in isolation doing their own thing and what suits them. Learners must develop an awareness that there are consequences for the decisions they make and actions they take, and will take account of that in the way(s) they exercise their agency in learning.

     

    And thirdly, agency includes an awareness of the responsibility of ones own actions on the environment and on others. So there’s a social connectedness kind of dimension to that. Every decision a learner makes, and action she or he takes, will impact on the thinking, behaviour or decisions of others - and vice versa. You can’t just act selfishly and call that acting with agency.

Aug 17, 16

"Learning technology is just about everywhere in education. Universities are replete with lecture capture tools, interactive media, web based content and personal response technologies; students arrive equipped with social media and mobile devices; technology supported distance education has been long established; universities are experimenting with flipped classrooms, gaming and MOOCs. What should we make it all, and do we consider these new trends threats or opportunities? How might we harness the powerful potential of these tools and technologies to engage students more, and enhance learning in higher education? What theories could be used to explain these phenomena, and how can social/psychological models better our understanding of how people learn when their communication, relationships and learning are mediated through technology? Can the established theories still offer useful explanations of new practices and experiences, or can we gain some illumination for a better understanding of learning in the digital age from the newer theories?"

  • Learning technology is just about everywhere in education. Universities are replete with lecture capture tools, interactive media, web based content and personal response technologies; students arrive equipped with social media and mobile devices; technology supported distance education has been long established; universities are experimenting with flipped classrooms, gaming and MOOCs. What should we make it all, and do we consider these new trends threats or opportunities? How might we harness the powerful potential of these tools and technologies to engage students more, and enhance learning in higher education? What theories could be used to explain these phenomena, and how can social/psychological models better our understanding of how people learn when their communication, relationships and learning are mediated through technology? Can the established theories still offer useful explanations of new practices and experiences, or can we gain some illumination for a better understanding of learning in the digital age from the newer theories?
Aug 17, 16

"A keynote presentation for the minicon Reform Symposium conference on May 4, 2014. Online global."

Aug 17, 16

"A keynote presentation for the minicon Reform Symposium conference on May 4, 2014. Online global."

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