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Neil Movold

Neil Movold's Public Library

Feb 05, 16

"The findings were clear: In both the United States and the Republic of Ireland, those with higher critical thinking scores reported fewer negative life events than those with lower critical thinking scores. While this is bad news for people with lower critical thinking scores, the good news is that that critical thinking can be improved through instruction (see Chance, 1986; Halpern, 2003; Moseley et al., 2005; Nisbett, 1992). Future research could explore the causal link between critical thinking and real-world outcomes of critical thinking, with special emphasis on the role of education and behavioral outcomes."

  • The findings were clear: In both the United States and the Republic of Ireland, those with higher critical thinking scores reported fewer negative life events than those with lower critical thinking scores. While this is bad news for people with lower critical thinking scores, the good news is that that critical thinking can be improved through instruction (see Chance, 1986; Halpern, 2003; Moseley et al., 2005; Nisbett, 1992). Future research could explore the causal link between critical thinking and real-world outcomes of critical thinking, with special emphasis on the role of education and behavioral outcomes.
  • In a world that is more complex and technical with each passing day, thinking critically about the information we consume is of the utmost importance. The evidence suggests that critical thinking scores can predict real-world outcomes and thus we need to appreciate that critical thinking is more than simply the new buzz word in education. Critical thinking is critical for life success. The good news is that there is a plethora of evidence that critical thinking skills can be taught and learned – critically important news coming at a critical time in history.
Feb 03, 16

"UTS Bachelor of Creative Intelligence & Innovation (BCII)
Creativity & Complexity school, February 1-12, 2016
(2 hour lecture/exercises)"

  • But it demands vivid insight and storytelling skill to present an idea that packs enough emotional power to be memorable.
  • Essentially, a story expresses how and why life changes.
  • Stories are how we remember; we tend to forget lists and bullet points.

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  • That is the promise of cognitive systems--a category of technologies that uses natural language processing and machine learning to enable people and machines to interact more naturally to extend and magnify human expertise and cognition.
  • Far from replacing our thinking, cognitive systems will extend our cognition and free us to think more creatively. In so doing, they will speed innovations and ultimately help build a Smarter Planet.

  • a person attached to another by feelings of affection or personal regard.
  • a person who gives assistance; patron; supporter:
  • a person who is on good terms with another; a person who is not hostile:

  • to have trust or confidence in; rely or depend on.
  • to expect confidently
  • reliance on and confidence in the truth, worth, reliability, etc, of a person or thing;
Jan 27, 16

"This power point shows the way that the internet has changed critical thinking in adults and young children."

  • This power point shows the way that the internet has changed critical thinking in adults and young children.

  • A.I. anxiety.
  • Kurzweil, now a director of engineering at Google, embraces such a future; he is perhaps the most famous of the techno-utopians, for he believes that technological progress will culminate in a merger of human and machine intelligence. We will all become "transhuman."

  • And yet, critical thinking about human ingenuity, built on sharp and meaningful distinctions, has rarely been more necessary. For our creations are changing society, the planet, and our lives, in ways that are historically unprecedented, profound — but often deeply undesirable
  • Because they can lead us rapidly to a dramatically lower quality of life.
  • Will we make a world in which what matters most — us — is what is maximized, optimized, prioritized

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  • Our emotional intelligence, our ability to negotiate, influence, empathize, and even be flexible, are qualities that computers cannot (yet) simulate.
  • Deming says that the fastest-growing (and highest-paying) jobs require a balance of cognitive skills and soft skills.
  • if you work extensively with people, chances are you're using skills that will ensure your competitiveness in the job market—skills such as considering others' points of view, building off their strengths, interpreting and managing people's emotions, and adapting to changing circumstances.

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Jan 27, 16

"The idea of a thinking machine is an amazing one. It would be like humans creating artificial life, only more impressive because we would be creating consciousness. Or would we?"

  • The idea of a thinking machine is an amazing one. It would be like humans creating artificial life, only more impressive because we would be creating consciousness. Or would we?
  • Generally speaking, what computers are good at, like raw data manipulation, humans are quite bad at; and what computers are bad at, such as language, poetry, voice recognition, interpreting complex behaviour and making holistic judgements, humans are quite good at.
  • When it comes to questions of value, questions about what we think is important in life and why, it’s interesting to consider two things. The first is if a thinking computer could be capable of attributing value to anything at all. The second is that if it could attribute value to anything, what would it choose?

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Jan 27, 16

"A critical thinking presentation designed for the ELT classroom and models Compass Publishing's On Point series."

  • A critical thinking presentation designed for the ELT classroom and models Compass Publishing's On Point series.

  • A precise formulation of “critical thinking” can be hard to pin down. A good working definition is perhaps  something like “Critical thinking is a set of rational, empirical methods and heuristics for formulating accurate beliefs about the world and making sound decisions based on those beliefs.”
  • Critical thinking involves rational evaluation of good evidence in order to formulate beliefs and decisions.
  • take a broad view of the available evidence, be as objective as possible, and avoid cherry-picking or focusing on evidence that confirms a bias or preconceived notion.

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Jan 27, 16

"Definition of critical thinking, core critical thinking skills, asking questions, characteristics of critical thinkers, standard for critical thinkers and exercises."

  • Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. In its exemplary form, it is based on universal intellectual values that transcend subject matter divisions: clarity, accuracy, precision, consistency, relevance, sound evidence, good reasons, depth, breadth, and fairness.
  • Critical thinking can be seen as having two components: 1) a set of information and belief generating and processing skills, and 2) the habit, based on intellectual commitment, of using those skills to guide behavior. It is thus to be contrasted with: 1) the mere acquisition and retention of information alone, because it involves a particular way in which information is sought and treated; 2) the mere possession of a set of skills, because it involves the continual use of them; and 3) the mere use of those skills ("as an exercise") without acceptance of their results.
  • Critical thinking of any kind is never universal in any individual; everyone is subject to episodes of undisciplined or irrational thought.

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  • Critical thinking means making reasoned judgments that are logical and well thought out. It is a way of thinking in which you don't simply accept all arguments and conclusions you are exposed to but rather have an attitude involving questioning such arguments and conclusions.
Jan 20, 16

"There is a big difference between the attention artificial intelligence (AI) is currently receiving and that of the 1990s. Twenty years ago, the focus was on logic-based AI, usually under the heading of knowledge representation, or KR, whereas today's focus is on machine learning and statistical algorithms. This shift has served AI well, since machine learning and stats provide effective algorithmic solutions to certain kinds of problems (such as image recognition), in a way that KR never did. However, I contend the pendulum has swung too far, and something valuable has been lost.

Knowledge representation is not a single thing. While I think an argument could be made about KR as a whole, I will be focusing on the "applied philosophy" aspect of it—the logical representation of commonsense notions, with an emphasis on clear semantical underpinnings."

  • usually under the heading of knowledge representation, or KR, whereas today's focus is on machine learning and statistical algorithms.
  • Twenty years ago, the focus was on logic-based AI
  • machine learning and stats provide effective algorithmic solutions to certain kinds of problems (such as image recognition), in a way that KR never did

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