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07 Oct 09

Judge orders killer released on compassionate grounds\nRichard Keech, 89, was serving a life term for shooting his son-in-law to death in Long Beach in 1996. He suffers from dementia. The judge says there's no obvious benefit to his further imprisonment.\n\nBy Victoria Kim\n\n10:06 PM PDT, October 5, 2009\n\nIn a quiet residential neighborhood in Long Beach 13 years ago, Dick Keech fired four shots at his son-in-law, who lay face-down on a neighbor's lawn, bleeding from an earlier gunshot wound.\n\n"It's all over," he said later to a neighbor who ran out at the sound. "He won't bother anyone anymore."\n\nOn Monday, a Long Beach judge said he would grant Keech, 89, the compassion he did not show his 47-year-old son-in-law, Nick Candy, at the time of the killing in 1996. Judge William T. Garner ordered Keech, who was serving a life term for murder, released on grounds that he is medically incapacitated. The World War II veteran suffers from progressive dementia and an accompanying "sundowning" syndrome causing severe confusion, depression and terror, according to a California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation report recommending his release. He has difficulty swallowing, spends most of his days confined to his bed or his geriatric chair, and is unable to do anything on his own, the report said.

06 Sep 09

TOM HENNESSY: Time to let prisoner, a WWII POW, go home to die

TOM HENNESSY: Time to let prisoner, a WWII POW, go home to die
Posted: 09/05/2009 08:45:30 PM PDT
Updated: 09/05/2009 09:14:49 PM PDT

Prisoner Richard Keech, shown during his 1997 trial, should be allowed to go home to die with his family. (Press-Telegram file photo)

Nearing his 90th birthday, Richard Keech is confined to a medical unit at the High Desert State Prison in Susanville.

His family says he stays alive on Ensure, a nutritional drink, and on weekly letters sent from Long Beach by his wife, Kay. Prison staffers read the letters to her husband, whose sight is failing.

The 1997 trial of Keech made area headlines. A prisoner-of-war during World War II, the one-time Marine defended the murder of his son-in-law, calling it a consequence of post-traumatic stress syndrome brought on by his incarceration in a Japanese prison camp.

“My father is in prison because he killed my abusive husband to protect my son, my mother, and me,” his daughter Nancy said in a recent advertisement she ran in the Press-Telegram.

With the family trying for a compassionate discharge that would give their patriarch a brief stay at home, the ad sought letters of support from readers.

11 Feb 06

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24 Jan 06

Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites/Forums<br>
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  • " Q: Peking Man and The China Marines? Seeking Info Regarding PM &CM as follows... ~~~~~ ~~~~~~~

     Here's one that's been on my mind for a long time, and I have come up dry on my searches for information that I once heard in regard to this topic, but can no longer locate.

      Briefly, the story goes that just prior to WW II when the China Marines were preparing to depart China, they were entrusted with the care of Peking Man (so-called by the professionals of that day) for delivery to the U.S. That was not to be, however, as the Japanese moved in too quickly, and the surrender of the Marines there ensued.

    The last the Marines saw of Peking Man was that it was boxed, and placed aboard a train in China; then, apparently fell into the hands of the Japanese.

    There are many bits and pieces on this on the Internet, and a search will produce many results. The following is one of the latest articles on Peking Man, though it mentions very little of the part played by the Marines.

    There may even be posts on my own China Marines Sites & CM Forum where I attempted to save some of this info years ago--but then I'm sure many of those old links are now dead.

       http://www.china.org.cn/english/2003/Nov/78935.htm
      The part I am wondering about though, is something I read or heard many, many years ago, and this I have been unable to retrieve.

    It may have even been on the old radio show, Marines In Review. It involves a WW II Marine, M/Sgt, I think, maybe even a former POW, who was stationed at CJHP just after the war. He stated in later years that he had possession of two locker boxes, as I recall it, which contained articles related to the Peking Man mystery. He claimed that he had hidden the boxes in an old, dry well aboard the base. He had later told his story and returned to CJHP to search for the old well, but could not find the well....."

  • " Q: Peking Man and The China Marines? Seeking Info Regarding PM &CM as follows... ~~~~~ ~~~~~~~

     Here's one that's been on my mind for a long time, and I have come up dry on my searches for information that I once heard in regard to this topic, but can no longer locate.

      Briefly, the story goes that just prior to WW II when the China Marines were preparing to depart China, they were entrusted with the care of Peking Man (so-called by the professionals of that day) for delivery to the U.S. That was not to be, however, as the Japanese moved in too quickly, and the surrender of the Marines there ensued.

    The last the Marines saw of Peking Man was that it was boxed, and placed aboard a train in China; then, apparently fell into the hands of the Japanese.

    There are many bits and pieces on this on the Internet, and a search will produce many results. The following is one of the latest articles on Peking Man, though it mentions very little of the part played by the Marines.

    There may even be posts on my own China Marines Sites & CM Forum where I attempted to save some of this info years ago--but then I'm sure many of those old links are now dead.

       http://www.china.org.cn/english/2003/Nov/78935.htm
      The part I am wondering about though, is something I read or heard many, many years ago, and this I have been unable to retrieve.

    It may have even been on the old radio show, Marines In Review. It involves a WW II Marine, M/Sgt, I think, maybe even a former POW, who was stationed at CJHP just after the war. He stated in later years that he had possession of two locker boxes, as I recall it, which contained articles related to the Peking Man mystery. He claimed that he had hidden the boxes in an old, dry well aboard the base. He had later told his story and returned to CJHP to search for the old well, but could not find the well....."

20 Jan 06

Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites/Forums<br>
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  • "Looking back on the crating of the Peking Man skulls.

      During World War II, Chinese scientists planned to have the Peking Man skulls escorted to the United States by evacuating US Marines. They were packed in two wooden crates marked A and B for the journey. But these priceless relics never made it to the safety of the American Museum of Natural History....."

  • "Looking back on the crating of the Peking Man skulls.

      During World War II, Chinese scientists planned to have the Peking Man skulls escorted to the United States by evacuating US Marines. They were packed in two wooden crates marked A and B for the journey. But these priceless relics never made it to the safety of the American Museum of Natural History....."

16 Jan 06

Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites/Forums<br>
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  • "The United States 15th Infantry Regiment in China,
    1912-1938, by Alfred Emile Cornebise

      Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Co., 2004. Pp. 273. Illus., notes, biblio., index. $45.00. ISBN:0-7864-1988-1.

       Conventional wisdom has it that the U.S. military presence overseas during the period between world wars was limited to the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. It is fairly well known that the United States had Marines and ships posted in China and several Caribbean countries before World War I and during the run up to World War II. This wisdom ignores the facts the army had units posted to China and the Panama Canal Zone during that period, in addition to garrisons in Germany until 1923, and in the American possessions of Puerto Rico and the Philippine Islands. Mr. Cornebise’s book examines the little known and often ignored presence of a U.S. Army infantry regiment posted at Tientsin [Tianjin], China between 1912 and 1938.

      The carefully documented book opens with an account of the history of the 15th Infantry from its organization in 1861 through the American Civil War, occupation duty in the post-war South, Indian Wars service throughout the western territories, overseas service in China during the Boxer Rebellion, and then on to multiple rotations to the Philippine Islands. This discussion sets the stage for its long-term deployment to China. The author then proceeds to explain the mission of the 15th Infantry in North China, and then goes on to take a look at the living conditions and events that the troops experienced.

      The regiment’s primary mission was to show the flag and represent U.S. interests in China. In this role it joined the military forces of other treaty powers, including the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Japan, Germany, and Russia. The regiment performed this mission admirably until the Japanese seizure of northern China in 1937.

    When China had been in self-inflicted turmoil between 1911 and 1927, the presence of small

  • "The United States 15th Infantry Regiment in China,
    1912-1938, by Alfred Emile Cornebise

      Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Co., 2004. Pp. 273. Illus., notes, biblio., index. $45.00. ISBN:0-7864-1988-1.

       Conventional wisdom has it that the U.S. military presence overseas during the period between world wars was limited to the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. It is fairly well known that the United States had Marines and ships posted in China and several Caribbean countries before World War I and during the run up to World War II. This wisdom ignores the facts the army had units posted to China and the Panama Canal Zone during that period, in addition to garrisons in Germany until 1923, and in the American possessions of Puerto Rico and the Philippine Islands. Mr. Cornebise’s book examines the little known and often ignored presence of a U.S. Army infantry regiment posted at Tientsin [Tianjin], China between 1912 and 1938.

      The carefully documented book opens with an account of the history of the 15th Infantry from its organization in 1861 through the American Civil War, occupation duty in the post-war South, Indian Wars service throughout the western territories, overseas service in China during the Boxer Rebellion, and then on to multiple rotations to the Philippine Islands. This discussion sets the stage for its long-term deployment to China. The author then proceeds to explain the mission of the 15th Infantry in North China, and then goes on to take a look at the living conditions and events that the troops experienced.

      The regiment’s primary mission was to show the flag and represent U.S. interests in China. In this role it joined the military forces of other treaty powers, including the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Japan, Germany, and Russia. The regiment performed this mission admirably until the Japanese seizure of northern China in 1937.

    When China had been in self-inflicted turmoil between 1911 and 1927, the presence of s

13 Jan 06

Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites/Forums<br>
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  • "Willaim A. Lee, second from right, and Chesty Puller, smoking a pipe, in Nicaragua in 1931, They are flanked by two Nicaraguan Soldiers.

      William A. Lee, 98, Marines' Acclaimed Ironman

         By Eric Page,, January 2, 1999

         William A. Lee, whose exploits in Nicaragua between the two world wars earned him three Navy Crosses, the nickname Ironman and a lasting place in Marine Corps legend, died last Sunday, December 27, 1998, at Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg, Va. He was 98 and lived in the nearby town of Ferry Farms.

      Lee, whose 32-year career with the Marines included nearly four years as a prisoner of the Japanese during World War II, was one of the last "of the old corps that fought in the banana wars between World War I and World War II in Central America and the Caribbean," said Robert Moskin, an authority on the service.

      "It was hand-to-hand combat, small-unit combat," Moskin said. "And people like Bill Lee were courageous."

      That much was evident from what he wore on his chest. For sailors and Marines, the Navy Cross is second only to the Medal of Honor among decorations for combat heroism. To win it three times, as he did while an enlisted man fighting in Nicaragua, was extraordinary.

      William Andrew Lee was born in Ward Hill, Mass., and enlisted in the Marine Corps as a teen-ager in 1918. He saw service in France near the end of World War I.

      In 1926, when Washington feared that a rebellion then under way in Nicaragua might bring leftists to power there, the Marines were dispatched with the ostensible mission of safeguarding U.S. property and citizens. In fact, they were soon in action against the rebels, who were led by Augusto Cesar Sandino.

      Lee, a crack shot and skilled knife fighter, won two Navy Crosses for actions there from March 20 to Aug. 19, 1930, and again from Dec. 11 to Dec. 20. But his finest hours appear to have been those he shared with the famed Marine Chesty Puller between Sept

  • "Willaim A. Lee, second from right, and Chesty Puller, smoking a pipe, in Nicaragua in 1931, They are flanked by two Nicaraguan Soldiers.

      William A. Lee, 98, Marines' Acclaimed Ironman

         By Eric Page,, January 2, 1999

         William A. Lee, whose exploits in Nicaragua between the two world wars earned him three Navy Crosses, the nickname Ironman and a lasting place in Marine Corps legend, died last Sunday, December 27, 1998, at Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg, Va. He was 98 and lived in the nearby town of Ferry Farms.

      Lee, whose 32-year career with the Marines included nearly four years as a prisoner of the Japanese during World War II, was one of the last "of the old corps that fought in the banana wars between World War I and World War II in Central America and the Caribbean," said Robert Moskin, an authority on the service.

      "It was hand-to-hand combat, small-unit combat," Moskin said. "And people like Bill Lee were courageous."

      That much was evident from what he wore on his chest. For sailors and Marines, the Navy Cross is second only to the Medal of Honor among decorations for combat heroism. To win it three times, as he did while an enlisted man fighting in Nicaragua, was extraordinary.

      William Andrew Lee was born in Ward Hill, Mass., and enlisted in the Marine Corps as a teen-ager in 1918. He saw service in France near the end of World War I.

      In 1926, when Washington feared that a rebellion then under way in Nicaragua might bring leftists to power there, the Marines were dispatched with the ostensible mission of safeguarding U.S. property and citizens. In fact, they were soon in action against the rebels, who were led by Augusto Cesar Sandino.

      Lee, a crack shot and skilled knife fighter, won two Navy Crosses for actions there from March 20 to Aug. 19, 1930, and again from Dec. 11 to Dec. 20. But his finest hours appear to have been those he shared with the famed Marine Chesty Puller between Sept

13 Jan 06

Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites/Forums<br>
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  • "Colonel William A. "Ironman" Lee, winner of three Navy Crosses and three Purple Hearts; veteran of World War I, the Banana Wars and World War II; distinguished shooter; Old China Hand; prisoner of war; one of the last of the Old Corps; and authentic Marine Corps legend, died in Fredericksburg, Va. He was 98.

      "In the days of wooden ships, Lee would have been an Ironman," said the late Lieutenant General Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller of him during their days of fighting bandits and rebels in Nicaragua. Puller was the only Marine with more Navy Crosses (a total of five) than Lee.

      Born in Ward Hill, Mass., Lee enlisted in 1918 and served in France at the end of the "Great War." In 1926, rebellion was brewing in the "banana republics" of Central America, and Lee was among the Marines sent to safeguard American lives and property. Much to the dismay of the rebels led by Augusto Cesar Sandino of Nicaragua. Lee thrived in the potentially deadly environment. He was a superb rifleman and pistol shot who in later years would be one of the Corps’ distinguished team shooters.

      From the late 1920s to the early l930s, Lee, Puller and other Marines sent to Nicaragua were appointed officers in the Guardia Nacional and protected American lives and property by engaging in counterinsurgency action against rebels and bandits. In 1932, Lee and Puller set out on a series of patrols as wild as anything in the Corps’ history or, for that matter, in the American West....."

  • "Colonel William A. "Ironman" Lee, winner of three Navy Crosses and three Purple Hearts; veteran of World War I, the Banana Wars and World War II; distinguished shooter; Old China Hand; prisoner of war; one of the last of the Old Corps; and authentic Marine Corps legend, died in Fredericksburg, Va. He was 98.

      "In the days of wooden ships, Lee would have been an Ironman," said the late Lieutenant General Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller of him during their days of fighting bandits and rebels in Nicaragua. Puller was the only Marine with more Navy Crosses (a total of five) than Lee.

      Born in Ward Hill, Mass., Lee enlisted in 1918 and served in France at the end of the "Great War." In 1926, rebellion was brewing in the "banana republics" of Central America, and Lee was among the Marines sent to safeguard American lives and property. Much to the dismay of the rebels led by Augusto Cesar Sandino of Nicaragua. Lee thrived in the potentially deadly environment. He was a superb rifleman and pistol shot who in later years would be one of the Corps’ distinguished team shooters.

      From the late 1920s to the early l930s, Lee, Puller and other Marines sent to Nicaragua were appointed officers in the Guardia Nacional and protected American lives and property by engaging in counterinsurgency action against rebels and bandits. In 1932, Lee and Puller set out on a series of patrols as wild as anything in the Corps’ history or, for that matter, in the American West....."

12 Jan 06

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  • "Treading Softly: U.S. Marines in China, 1819-1949, by George B. Clark. Westport, Connecticut, Praeger, 2001. xviii, 208 pp. $92.95 US (cloth).  During the first three-and-a-half decades of the twentieth century, the US Marines acquired a reputation as America's warrior elite - a seaborne collection of straight-shooting roughnecks poised to protect American lives and property in distant lands at a moment's notice. Whenever some disturbance threatened American interests in Latin America or Asia, the press and the public took up the cry, "Send in the Marines." The American media was soon depicting the Marine Corps as their country's version of the French Foreign Legion: crack light infantry ideal for any overseas adventure.  Of all the Marine Corps' postings during this era of armed interventionism, none exuded more glamour or inspired more fondness than China. American marines saw combat in China several times in the nineteenth century, but the corps became irrevocably linked to that vast nation in the summer of 1900 when a detachment of forty-nine "Leathernecks" helped defend Peking's foreign legations during the Boxer Rebellion. Hundreds of additional marines joined the international force that relieved the foreigners besieged at Tientsin and Peking....."
  • "Treading Softly: U.S. Marines in China, 1819-1949, by George B. Clark. Westport, Connecticut, Praeger, 2001. xviii, 208 pp. $92.95 US (cloth).  During the first three-and-a-half decades of the twentieth century, the US Marines acquired a reputation as America's warrior elite - a seaborne collection of straight-shooting roughnecks poised to protect American lives and property in distant lands at a moment's notice. Whenever some disturbance threatened American interests in Latin America or Asia, the press and the public took up the cry, "Send in the Marines." The American media was soon depicting the Marine Corps as their country's version of the French Foreign Legion: crack light infantry ideal for any overseas adventure.  Of all the Marine Corps' postings during this era of armed interventionism, none exuded more glamour or inspired more fondness than China. American marines saw combat in China several times in the nineteenth century, but the corps became irrevocably linked to that vast nation in the summer of 1900 when a detachment of forty-nine "Leathernecks" helped defend Peking's foreign legations during the Boxer Rebellion. Hundreds of additional marines joined the international force that relieved the foreigners besieged at Tientsin and Peking....."
12 Jan 06

Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites/Forums<br>
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  • " Story of a Sword A Marine's View of the The Surrender Of The Japanese Forces In Northern China, November 1945 to The Third Amphibious Corps of the United States Marine Corps in Tientsin, China  by Oliver Titchenal  Patches Third Amphibious Corps and 2nd Division Patches.   * Preparing for Invasion  * On to China  * Surrender Ceremony  * The Samurai Tradition  * The BOMB  * The Sword  * Marine Corps Life in China   Preparing for Invasion When Japanese surrendered in August of 1945, thus ending World War II, I was in the 35th replacement battalion. The 35th had been attached to the 8th Regiment of the 2nd Marine Division of the U.S. Marine Corps stationed on Saipan as the Regiment's Shore Party Team.  I had arrived on Saipan in December, 1944 just after the 2nd Marines had secured the island. In April through September, the 2nd Marine Division and Marine amphibious forces had in quick succession stormed Saipan, Tinian and re-occupied Guam. The islands were taken and occupied in order to build air bases that were within bombing distance of Tokyo. In December of 1944, B-29 Superfortresses were already flying daily bombing runs to Tokyo 1500 miles away.  The Shore Party Team's job was to occupy and hold the beach, then bring in, unload and store ammunition for troops, right after the first wave of assault troops hit and established the beach head. This could be a dangerous task. The Japanese would have all their big guns targeted at the beachhead and our group would be under fire at all times until the guns were destroyed.  The 8th regiment had just returned from the battle of Okinawa. We were settled in our camp again and were training for the invasion of the mainland of Japan. The 2nd Marine Division was scheduled to be part of the assault troops of the attack.  Needless to say, I was happy that the war was over. The 35th draft was not an integrated part of the 2nd Division so, now I was waiting to find out what was to hap
  • " Story of a Sword A Marine's View of the The Surrender Of The Japanese Forces In Northern China, November 1945 to The Third Amphibious Corps of the United States Marine Corps in Tientsin, China  by Oliver Titchenal  Patches Third Amphibious Corps and 2nd Division Patches.   * Preparing for Invasion  * On to China  * Surrender Ceremony  * The Samurai Tradition  * The BOMB  * The Sword  * Marine Corps Life in China   Preparing for Invasion When Japanese surrendered in August of 1945, thus ending World War II, I was in the 35th replacement battalion. The 35th had been attached to the 8th Regiment of the 2nd Marine Division of the U.S. Marine Corps stationed on Saipan as the Regiment's Shore Party Team.  I had arrived on Saipan in December, 1944 just after the 2nd Marines had secured the island. In April through September, the 2nd Marine Division and Marine amphibious forces had in quick succession stormed Saipan, Tinian and re-occupied Guam. The islands were taken and occupied in order to build air bases that were within bombing distance of Tokyo. In December of 1944, B-29 Superfortresses were already flying daily bombing runs to Tokyo 1500 miles away.  The Shore Party Team's job was to occupy and hold the beach, then bring in, unload and store ammunition for troops, right after the first wave of assault troops hit and established the beach head. This could be a dangerous task. The Japanese would have all their big guns targeted at the beachhead and our group would be under fire at all times until the guns were destroyed.  The 8th regiment had just returned from the battle of Okinawa. We were settled in our camp again and were training for the invasion of the mainland of Japan. The 2nd Marine Division was scheduled to be part of the assault troops of the attack.  Needless to say, I was happy that the war was over. The 35th draft was not an integrated part of the 2nd Division so, now I was waiting to find out what was to hap
12 Jan 06

Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites/Forums<br>
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  • "Article from World War II Magazine China Marines: The Lost Leathernecks In the twilight of peace, the China Marines found themselves on the front lines of conflict.  By Eric Niderost   The United States Marine Corps had served with distinction in many parts of the world, but those serving in China in the 1930s faced a unique set of challenges. From 1937 to 1941, as relations between the United States and Japan steadily deteriorated, the "China Marines" became the subject of heated debate between the State Department, the diplomatic corps and the military. The disagreements were in part a reflection of the deep divisions that plagued the U.S. government and the nation at large.  In the final years prior to Pearl Harbor, Marines were stationed in several parts of north and central China protecting U.S. interests as they had done since the Boxer Rebellion of 1900. Perhaps the most famous of these isolated detachments of leathernecks, at least in terms of popular imagination and historical association, was the Embassy Guard Detachment at Peking.  ...."
  • "Article from World War II Magazine China Marines: The Lost Leathernecks In the twilight of peace, the China Marines found themselves on the front lines of conflict.  By Eric Niderost   The United States Marine Corps had served with distinction in many parts of the world, but those serving in China in the 1930s faced a unique set of challenges. From 1937 to 1941, as relations between the United States and Japan steadily deteriorated, the "China Marines" became the subject of heated debate between the State Department, the diplomatic corps and the military. The disagreements were in part a reflection of the deep divisions that plagued the U.S. government and the nation at large.  In the final years prior to Pearl Harbor, Marines were stationed in several parts of north and central China protecting U.S. interests as they had done since the Boxer Rebellion of 1900. Perhaps the most famous of these isolated detachments of leathernecks, at least in terms of popular imagination and historical association, was the Embassy Guard Detachment at Peking.  ...."
12 Dec 05

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  • "Hi! It's Tuesday morning now in Pleasant Valley (wherever that is). The good news is I once again have my word processor and am in a two man cell with a desk. The bad news is that CMC finally called my bluff. "You are the first inmate in all these years we couldn't trick into volunteering to leave. But you were right, we really do have the authority to make that request an order. So - good-bye, we're shipping you out - to Pleasant Valley."  Once again I see myself the winner. I have spent some five years on a pleasant vacation from standard prison life. That was a wonderful break. Now I have to return to the duty I volunteered for some 8 years ago, regular California prison life.  This gives me a sense of de-ja-vu. I've been there before. Like when we had to leave the luxury of Shanghai and return to a life as a fighting Marine, a beach in the Philippines. That was the world I had signed up for. I couldn't complain.  They tell me I am ...."
  • "Hi! It's Tuesday morning now in Pleasant Valley (wherever that is). The good news is I once again have my word processor and am in a two man cell with a desk. The bad news is that CMC finally called my bluff. "You are the first inmate in all these years we couldn't trick into volunteering to leave. But you were right, we really do have the authority to make that request an order. So - good-bye, we're shipping you out - to Pleasant Valley."  Once again I see myself the winner. I have spent some five years on a pleasant vacation from standard prison life. That was a wonderful break. Now I have to return to the duty I volunteered for some 8 years ago, regular California prison life.  This gives me a sense of de-ja-vu. I've been there before. Like when we had to leave the luxury of Shanghai and return to a life as a fighting Marine, a beach in the Philippines. That was the world I had signed up for. I couldn't complain.  They tell me I am ...."
15 Sep 05

Few Americans realize that at the conclusion of WW II the U.S. Marines fought on in China deom 1945 through 1949...

  • Have been doing some really serious writing these past few weeks, and just dropped in here to see who has won the latest award for the last greatest mangler of Marine Corps History. Darned hard to pick a winner in this bunch. What gets me is that I'll just post a 200 word paragraph straightening out one 10 word sentence when someone else comes along with some other ding a ling notion that's worse than the first. Whatever happened to news groups when responses were posted with what led to them? Have a few new pieces on my web site, but since they are not of the "See Jane run." type doubt if they will draw many readers. Will get back to work tomorrow.
  • Have been doing some really serious writing these past few weeks, and just dropped in here to see who has won the latest award for the last greatest mangler of Marine Corps History. Darned hard to pick a winner in this bunch. What gets me is that I'll just post a 200 word paragraph straightening out one 10 word sentence when someone else comes along with some other ding a ling notion that's worse than the first. Whatever happened to news groups when responses were posted with what led to them? Have a few new pieces on my web site, but since they are not of the "See Jane run." type doubt if they will draw many readers. Will get back to work tomorrow.
09 Aug 05

OK--verifying the authorship may be impossible, as is stated--but I just have no trouble believing that it is very likely accurate!
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  • The following is a transcript of a speech believed to have been given by Mr. Chi Haotian, Minster of Defense and vice-chairman of China’s Central Military Commission. Independently verifying the authorship of the speech is not possible. It is worth reading because it is believed to set out the CCP’s strategy for the development of China. The speech argues for the necessity of China using biological warfare to depopulate the United States and prepare it for a future massive Chinese colonization. “The War Is Not Far from Us and Is the Midwife of the Chinese Century” was published on February 15, 2005 on www.peacehall.com and was published on www.boxun.com on April 23, 2005. This speech and a related speech, “The War Is Approaching Us” are analyzed in The Epoch Times original article “The CCP’s Last-ditch Gamble: Biological and Nuclear War.”
  • The following is a transcript of a speech believed to have been given by Mr. Chi Haotian, Minster of Defense and vice-chairman of China’s Central Military Commission. Independently verifying the authorship of the speech is not possible. It is worth reading because it is believed to set out the CCP’s strategy for the development of China. The speech argues for the necessity of China using biological warfare to depopulate the United States and prepare it for a future massive Chinese colonization. “The War Is Not Far from Us and Is the Midwife of the Chinese Century” was published on February 15, 2005 on www.peacehall.com and was published on www.boxun.com on April 23, 2005. This speech and a related speech, “The War Is Approaching Us” are analyzed in The Epoch Times original article “The CCP’s Last-ditch Gamble: Biological and Nuclear War.”
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