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Jonathan Groves

Jonathan Groves's Public Library

  • I think when I came in we had 90 people on the journalism side, and now I think we are at 79 or 78.
  • We have subscriptions to our weekly news magazine — we have about 50,000 subscribers. We have a paid newsletter called The Daily News Briefing, and it’s delivered by email every day. About 10,000 people read it; 2,500 are pure-play subscribers, and another 10,000 read it as part of a bundled package
  • We pioneered the development of a ProQuest daily summary drawn from our website.

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  • What happens, though, when spectacle replaces intimacy is that characters and story disappear, too. Julianne Hough was impressive as Sandy, especially in the dance numbers; Aaron Tveit’s Danny was serviceable; and Vanessa Hudgens, whose father had died the night before, deserves some kind of prize for gutting through Rizzo. The actors did fine, but the characters and their arcs became secondary to executing the grand scheme.

  • Nearly every social network now treats a link as just the same as it treats any other object — the same as a photo, or a piece of text — instead of seeing it as a way to make that text richer. You’re encouraged to post one single hyperlink and expose it to a quasi-democratic process of liking and plussing and hearting: Adding several links to a piece of text is usually not allowed. Hyperlinks are objectivized, isolated, stripped of their powers.

  • “We learned a lot through that experience,” she said. “But it’s not a product that we continue to sell.”
  • NorthJersey.com already existed as a site; its N2 project was a relaunch “to engage a broader audience, including nonconsumers of news.” In 2006, GateHouse had already acquired Enterprise NewsMedia, owner of Wicked Local, which had one site in Plymouth, Mass. The goal of their Newspaper Next project was the expansion of the Wicked Local model.
  • Wicked Local continued to grow outside of Plymouth and now has more than 100 sites across Massachusetts that incorporates news from weekly papers. . Wicked Local sites follow a hyperlocal template by now familiar: turn-of-the-screw developments on building and planning issues, updates on police reports, and a healthy dose of kids and schools.

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  • People want to be part of a tribe, and magazines with tailored content for an ardent readership reinforce a strong sense of community.

  • But the profession’s wide adoption of engagement staffers suggests they’re equally vital to the digital newsroom as traditional journalists, as noted last month by MediaShift. They elevate a publication’s online persona by creating Web-friendly headlines, prioritizing when and on which social platforms stories are posted, and patrolling notoriously dicey comment sections.
  • It’s hard to gauge success. Page views, civility, and any number of criteria play a role (The Guardian, for instance, sometimes considers news tips a success, while the WSJ values “high-minded” conversation in its Facebook threads). But studies and experts say news outlets can no longer flourish without devising some kind of approach to their online communities—even if that approach is desertion.
  • lgorithms pre-moderate comments, meaning a post doesn’t appear on the site before passing human eyes, says Bassey Etim, lead community manager.

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  • In tandem with the growth of mobile has been the further rise of the social Web, where the flow of information embodies a whole new dynamic. Some of our 2014 research revealed that nearly half of Web-using adults report getting news about politics and government in the past week on Facebook, a platform where influence is driven to a strong degree by friends and algorithms.
  • legacy platforms have by no means been abandoned, though some are faring better than others.

  • We have been absolutely stunned by the adoption rate of our most recent Roku apps. Keep in mind we are in smaller markets. We use speed to 1,000 downloads as a benchmark. Prior to last month, our fastest app to 1,000 downloads took three weeks and that was seven months ago. Our two most recent apps hit 1,000 in 1 1/2 and three days.
  • They used Rokus as a circulation premium for annual and ez pay subscriptions. I believe they've given away over 1,000 Roku boxes since Christmas.
  • "we don't publish a newspaper to make money, we make money to publish a newspaper."

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  • We’re much more interested in increasing engagement than getting big. So we’ve really focused on a few markets that are really important to us, and right now we’re working on really increasing engagements, making sure the people that are on our service just love it. And that’s really what we watch. I think over time we’ll think about expanding the product, but right now it’s really just a maniacal focus on making great products and deepening the engagement with our service.
  • We’re much more interested in increasing engagement than getting big. So we’ve really focused on a few markets that are really important to us, and right now we’re working on really increasing engagements, making sure the people that are on our service just love it. And that’s really what we watch. I think over time we’ll think about expanding the product, but right now it’s really just a maniacal focus on making great products and deepening the engagement with our service.
  • We’re much more interested in increasing engagement than getting big. So we’ve really focused on a few markets that are really important to us, and right now we’re working on really increasing engagements, making sure the people that are on our service just love it. And that’s really what we watch. I think over time we’ll think about expanding the product, but right now it’s really just a maniacal focus on making great products and deepening the engagement with our service.

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  • you will have built up an in-depth knowledge of how to go about things, so this 70% will be your bread and butter campaigns. He suggested that 20% of your marketing should also be 'programmatic', which is more rules-driven and automated in response to various stimuli; so it is not planned, but it is responsive, and, typically, machine-driven and executed. Finally, 10% of your marketing should be purely responsive - this is Oreo-style Real-time marketing.

  • In the next era of The New Republic, we will aggressively adapt to the newest information technologies without sacrificing our commitment to serious journalism. We will look to tell the most important stories in politics and the arts and provide the type of rigorous analysis that The New Republic has been known for. We will ask pressing questions of our leaders, share groundbreaking new ideas, and shed new light on the state of politics and culture.

  • Gigaom has been VC-financed from the beginning. Other media startups were not. And when you take venture capital money they’re golden handcuffs, in a way. It’s a Faustian bargain. You make certain promises about your growth, and if that growth doesn’t materialize then VCs lose interest and your company fails.
  • Gigaom has been VC-financed from the beginning. Other media startups were not. And when you take venture capital money they’re golden handcuffs, in a way. It’s a Faustian bargain. You make certain promises about your growth, and if that growth doesn’t materialize then VCs lose interest and your company fails.
  • Gigaom has been VC-financed from the beginning. Other media startups were not. And when you take venture capital money they’re golden handcuffs, in a way. It’s a Faustian bargain. You make certain promises about your growth, and if that growth doesn’t materialize then VCs lose interest and your company fails.

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  • we sell the antidote to information overload — we sell a finite, finishable, very tightly curated bundle of content.
  • there’s lots of interesting stuff being tried that venture money is funding — so there’s a lot of innovation going on. And that’s kind of interesting, because we can say” “Oh, that’s quite interesting what they’re doing — why don’t we try it?” It’s bad because we have to compete with those organizations — which basically have infinite money and aren’t required to make profits — for talent. Relatively speaking, we were able to steal talent from other news organizations for the past decade because we were profitable and they weren’t. With a few exceptions obviously — Bloomberg and such. Our relative health was good. Now we face these big very deep pocketed venture-backed rivals, so that makes it a bit harder for us.
  • So we’re switching toward what we call thought leadership, which is we sell sponsorship of conferences, with white papers, with online advertising as well. But essentially it’s not straightforward display advertising. It allows advertisers to associate themselves with particular topic areas, or raise their profiles in particular areas.

  • Communications

     

    Co-Chairs

  • It might seem, and it often feels, as though stuff on the Web lasts forever, for better and frequently for worse: the embarrassing photograph, the regretted blog (more usually regrettable not in the way the slaughter of civilians is regrettable but in the way that bad hair is regrettable). No one believes any longer, if anyone ever did, that “if it’s on the Web it must be true,” but a lot of people do believe that if it’s on the Web it will stay on the Web. Chances are, though, that it actually won’t.
  • Web pages don’t have to be deliberately deleted to disappear. Sites hosted by corporations tend to die with their hosts.
  • The Web dwells in a never-ending present. It is—elementally—ethereal, ephemeral, unstable, and unreliable.

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  • I am frightened by the imbalance, the constant striving to reach the largest possible audience for everything; by the absence of a sustained study of the state of the nation.

  • Over my years in France, I never took much interest in Charlie Hebdo. Its founders said they intended their publication to be “bête et mechant,” or “stupid and vicious,” a very different concept of journalism from the one espoused by my newspaper home: “to injure no man, but to bless all mankind.”

  • “Our business is so volatile that you can’t take an historian’s view about where this will be in five years. We work in the moment in our business.”

  • I don’t want to tell you what to tweet. But I do want you to think about how your tweets can be perceived without context. I’m as guilty as anyone about using Twitter as a place for absurdity and trolling among friends, but the last couple of days have made it clear how people are willing to conflate personal tweets as official company statements. If it’s willful conflation, then there’s nothing to be done. But try to keep in mind when a tweet could be innocently misinterpreted—and then don’t tweet.

  • These variable rewards come in three forms. The reward of the tribe: people who use Twitter or Pinterest are rewarded with social validation when their tweets are retweeted or their pictures are pinned. The reward of the hunt: users quickly scroll through their feeds in search of the latest gossip or funny cat pictures. And the reward of self-fulfilment: people are driven to achieve the next level on a video game, or an empty e-mail inbox.
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