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Gary Edwards

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May 18, 16

"When Google scored a $400 million to $600 million deal to supply cloud services to Apple Inc. last week, according to multiple reports, it was widely viewed as a coup for the search giant’s cloud business.
And why not? Apple, which has been relying mainly on Amazon Web Services as well as Microsoft Corp.’s Azure to run part of its iCloud and other services, is a marquee reference customer. It will get Google in the door of just about every big company–and, not incidentally, throw a little shade on its rivals.
But the big win obscures a stark reality for Google’s Cloud Platform: At just $500 million in revenues according to Morgan Stanley estimates, it trails far behind AWS’s $7.9 billion reported revenues in 2015, and it’s even a distant third behind Azure’s $1.1 billion in estimated sales.
This week, Google will attempt to show how it aims to scramble into cloud contention at its first global cloud users conference, NEXT, starting Wednesday in San Francisco. At the show, Google will trot out Diane Greene, the onetime co-founder and CEO of cloud pioneer VMware who now heads all of Google’s cloud and enterprise applications businesses. This will be Greene’s first significant public appearance since Google bought her company, Bebop, for $380 million last November. Customers and investors alike will be watching closely to see what strategy she lays out for the coming year and beyond.
Searching for a cloud coup

Google plans to introduce both a raft of new cloud features and updates as well as some significant new customers, according to various sources in the company. On the product front, there will be news about Google’s container technologies, which allow applications to run more efficiently across cloud servers using the same operating system without interfering with each other, David Aronchick, senior product manager for Google’s Container Engine, said Tuesday at a press briefing. “NEXT will be an opportunity to highlight all the traction we’ve gotten,” he said.
Also on the agenda are big-name customers such as The Home Depot and Coca-Cola Co., as well as recent new customers such as Spotify Ltd. There also will be a speaker from Netflix Inc., which uses Google Cloud only for backup storage, not its massive streaming video–which has some observers such as Morgan Stanley’s Brian Nowak wondering if that could be the next big cloud coup for Google. “One of our goals for 2016 is to show the enterprise we’re ready for them,” said Greg DeMichillie, a Google Cloud Platform director of product management. “Tomorrow we’ll be talking more about that.”"

  • Continued from page 2

    But in the past year, it has migrated much of its cloud-based services to Google, for a number of reasons, said Isaac Mosquera, the company’s vice president of data, engineering and insights. In particular, ShareThis is using Google’s cloud storage and its BigQuery data analytics because  Google provides an additional layer of abstraction through its Kubernetes software for managing cloud applications. That means ShareThis needs fewer engineers to manage the system, saving up to 60 percent of operational costs over AWS. Although the company still uses AWS, said Mosquera, “we’re slowly transitioning everything over to Google.”

     

    Despite the enthusiasm of some customers, Google has a big to-do list that won’t get entirely checked off anytime soon. For one, said Lydia Leong, a vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner, the company needs a broader range of cloud services, especially popular business apps such as SAP and those of cloud rivals Oracle and Microsoft. To that end, Google was reported recently by Recode to have compiled of potential acquisitions of app companies, including public e-commerce company Shopify, payroll provider Namely, and sales tracker Xactly.

  • Google also would benefit from focusing on areas where it currently is stronger than competitors, such as big data analytics, said Gracely. “They have huge data sets that they could expose to customers,” Gracely said. “This should be the market segment that Google is primarily focused on.”

     

    Google’s Hölzle said late last year that he expected the company’s cloud revenues to top its ad revenues by 2020. But given how far Google trails behind AWS and Azure, observers remain skeptical that Google can gain much anytime soon on AWS and Azure. “It will take years for Google to build a material enterprise sales/support presence and a suite of Cloud Platform services that will be competitive with Azure,” Deutsche Bank analyst Karl Keirstead wrote in a note to clients late last year.

     
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    For now, the race for market share may well matter less for the next few years than the fact that the market itself is booming. No matter how small Google’s boat may be right now, it could rise rapidly on that tide.

     

    Adapted from my SiliconANGLE story.

  • Continued from page 1

    Google also may unveil new partners, such as consultants and resellers that would supplement direct sales to reach more small and midsized businesses. And it could even announce a new round of price cuts, the last of which was nearly a year ago. Google has been hammering on its claimed price advantage, which so far has helped it capture business from thrifty companies.

     

    Still, to win over the skeptics, Greene will have to answer several more big questions about its cloud business–most of all whether it’s really serious this time about enterprise computing. Although Greene’s hiring last November was seen as a sign that Google is finally getting serious about the cloud, many customers are not yet convinced of its resolve to move beyond consumer services in a big way.

     

    In recent years, the company has appeared to change strategies often, and it releases many services in beta test mode without deadlines for finished releases. That gives pause to enterprises that can’t afford to bet their businesses on a cloud computing provider without a guarantee of a reliable foundation of services. “Companies aren’t always sure if a [Google cloud] service will move from beta to general availability, or beta to cancelled,” said Wikibon analyst Brian Gracely.

     

    That’s the big reason why, analysts say, Google has not yet persuaded its large enterprise customers to commit to big spending on its cloud services. Even Apple’s reported $400 million to $600 million deal for Google cloud services, for instance, is a small portion of Apple’s overall cloud and data center spending. A source close to the situation noted that Apple already has been using Google cloud storage for some time and that the deal likely doesn’t include a broad range of cloud services.

  • Google’s overall business isn’t yet hurting for lack of a leading cloud business. Indeed, it has leveraged its massive, sophisticated computer and networking infrastructure to lucrative effect to run its own search and YouTube, as well as its massive advertising business. It also is accelerating the building of data centers for its cloud platform, including two new ones announced today in Oregon and Japan, with plans for 10 more around the world by the end of 2017.

     

    But failing up to now to make a big play to offer up parts of that infrastructure for other companies to use means Google has foregone billions of dollars in revenues. The lack of a pole position in cloud services also potentially leaves the company vulnerable to key rivals such as Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, and even new customer Apple, each of which is expanding into various key technology markets from advertising to apps to video. Not least, Google risks being seen as an also-ran in tech’s next big wave.

  • Some customers are convinced Google is getting on the right track. ShareThis is best known for its social sharing widget on thousands of websites, but it also makes coin from using the two terabytes of data gathered from all that sharing to help advertisers target customers and analyze ad campaigns. To handle all that, it used Amazon’s cloud services to store and analyze the data.
May 18, 16

"When Google scored a $400 million to $600 million deal to supply cloud services to Apple last week, according to multiple reports, it was widely viewed as a coup for the search giant’s cloud business.

And why not? Apple, which has been relying mainly on Amazon Web Services as well as Microsoft’s Azure to run part of its iCloud and other services, is a marquee reference customer. It will get Google in the door of just about every big company–and, not incidentally, throw a little shade on its rivals.

But the big win obscures a stark reality for Google’s Cloud Platform: At just $500 million in revenues according to Morgan Stanley estimates, it trails far behind AWS’s $7.9 billion reported revenues in 2015, and it’s even a distant third behind Azure’s $1.1 billion in estimated sales.

Starting today, Mar. 23, Google will attempt to show how it aims to scramble into cloud contention at its first global cloud users conference, NEXT, in San Francisco. At the show, Google will trot out Diane Greene, the onetime co-founder and CEO of cloud pioneer VMware who now heads all of Google’s cloud and enterprise applications businesses. This will be Greene’s first significant public appearance since Google bought her company, Bebop, for $380 million last November. Customers and investors alike will be watching closely to see what strategy she lays out for the coming year and beyond.

Google plans to introduce both a raft of new cloud features and updates as well as some significant new customers, according to various sources in the company. On the product front, there will be news about Google’s container technologies, which allow applications to run more efficiently across cloud servers using the same operating system without interfering with each other, David Aronchick, senior product manager for Google’s Container Engine, said Tuesday at a press briefing. “NEXT will be an opportunity to highlight all the traction we’ve gotten,” he said."

  • When Google scored a $400 million to $600 million deal to supply cloud services to Apple last week, according to multiple reports, it was widely viewed as a coup for the search giant’s cloud business.

     

    And why not? Apple, which has been relying mainly on Amazon Web Services as well as Microsoft’s Azure to run part of its iCloud and other services, is a marquee reference customer. It will get Google in the door of just about every big company–and, not incidentally, throw a little shade on its rivals.

     

    But the big win obscures a stark reality for Google’s Cloud Platform: At just $500 million in revenues according to Morgan Stanley estimates, it trails far behind AWS’s $7.9 billion reported revenues in 2015, and it’s even a distant third behind Azure’s $1.1 billion in estimated sales.

     
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    Starting today, Mar. 23, Google will attempt to show how it aims to scramble into cloud contention at its first global cloud users conference, NEXT, in San Francisco. At the show, Google will trot out Diane Greene, the onetime co-founder and CEO of cloud pioneer VMware who now heads all of Google’s cloud and enterprise applications businesses. This will be Greene’s first significant public appearance since Google bought her company, Bebop, for $380 million last November. Customers and investors alike will be watching closely to see what strategy she lays out for the coming year and beyond.

     

    Google plans to introduce both a raft of new cloud features and updates as well as some significant new customers, according to various sources in the company. On the product front, there will be news about Google’s container technologies, which allow applications to run more efficiently across cloud servers using the same operating system without interfering with each other, David Aronchick, senior product manager for Google’s Container Engine, said Tuesday at a press briefing. “NEXT will be an opportunity to highlight all the traction we’ve gotten,” he said.

  • Also on the agenda are big-name customers such as Home Depot and Coca-Cola, as well as recent new customers such as Spotify. There also will be a speaker from Netflix, which uses Google Cloud only for backup storage, not its massive streaming video–which has some observers such as Morgan Stanley’s Brian Nowak wondering if that could be the next big cloud coup for Google. “One of our goals for 2016 is to show the enterprise we’re ready for them,” said Greg DeMichillie, a Google Cloud Platform director of product management. “Tomorrow we’ll be talking more about that.”

     

    More clues to Google’s plans will come from other leading lights scheduled to talk, such as Urs Hölzle, senior vice president of technical infrastructure, and Google Fellow Jeff Dean, who helped spearhead key cloud technologies such as the Big Data programming model MapReduce and the data storage system Bigtable as well as Google’s recent artificial intelligence breakthroughs. The latter is a key focus of its cloud offerings, given the huge role artificial intelligence has played in Google search, speech recognition, language translation, image recognition, and other products. In particular, Dean is expected to talk about the recently introduced Vision Application Programming Interface for other applications to tap.

May 18, 16

"SAN FRANCISCO — The number of worldwide email users will reach 2.9 billion by the end of 2019, according to predictions from The Radicati Group. But has anyone really learned to use it effectively and efficiently in the workplace?

Two-year-old San Francisco startup Emmerge claims it has: It's marketing an inbox with collaboration features, which is designed to streamline team projects.

Project Management and Collaboration
The project management and collaboration platform in one allows users to assign action items in the body of emails and build on ongoing tasks and projects. Emmerge organizes information by hashtags and also offers a way for employees to track billable hours if they need to do that, too.

Emmerge CEO and founder Marc Blinder said his company isn't trying to replace email. Rather, it is trying to enhance it with a little "social DNA" and other features. “We know everyone in the business world is going check emails," he said. Emmerge offers a new way to look at it, he continued.

Blinder said the Emmerge solution is more collaborative than the way Google looks at email, with a "consumer-first lens … We do it on a team basis. The fundamental philosophical difference is that team aspect that gets better and better as more people use it.”"

May 17, 16

"Venture capital (VC) firms will go to great lengths to convince the most promising tech founders to accept their deals so they can get their hands on that all-important slice of equity.

Some of them will offer introductions to important people in their network, while others will offer hardcore engineering support and a cool place to work. The very best advice, swanky dinners, and even the odd CEO retreat are also up for grabs if you sign a term sheet with us, they might say.

But Vineet Jain, CEO and cofounder of cloud storage firm Egnyte, which has raised $62 million (£43 million), believes many VCs overpromise.

Speaking to Business Insider by phone on Tuesday, Jain said: "Most VC firms say we give you more than money. That’s complete hogwash."

Egnyte, which competes with Box and Dropbox, has been backed by Google Ventures, the venture capital arm of Google, and Kleiner Perkins, a well-known Silicon Valley investor with billions at its disposal.

Jain, whose company is based over the road from Google in Mountain View, was quick to say that Google Ventures is unlike many other venture capital companies. "They were instrumental to us," he said, adding that the firm helped Egnyte to improve its web user interface and assisted with the company's marketing efforts.

Egnyte has also integrated its cloud storage platform — used by 15,000 companies — with Google's own cloud platform, Google Drive.

Unlike Box and Dropbox, who have raised $558 million (£385 million) and $1.1 billion (£760 million) respectively, Egnyte is on target to be cash flow positive by the third quarter of this year.

"I refused to have a free version of Egnyte," said Jain. "Look at where I am today.""

  • The company chose Google for the WinField Data Silo in part because of its deep Maps API integration, which will overlay data from the application onto a map to make it easier for users to digest the information. For this application, WinField looked at Google, Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Box, before deciding to go with GCP.

    If Google's solution ever becomes unsuitable for Land O'Lakes's purposes, the company has built the WinField Data Silo to be capable of moving to competing cloud platforms, along with its other applications, Bekele said.

  • The game has changed.

     

    In April, venture capitalist Bill Gurley wrote an essay crystallizing what many VCs had been talking about for months.

     

    Essentially, too many companies have taken too much money at unsupportable valuations. A lot of the money they raised came with huge caveats that would protect late-stage investors.

  • A lot of these businesses now have limited options, Gurley wrote. They can't raise more money from the private markets because their last rounds came with such strict conditions. They can't go public because their numbers aren't good enough.
May 13, 16

"GAME 1       Monday, May 16              6:00 p.m.           Oracle Arena                        TNT         KNBR 680 / ESPN Radio

GAME 2       Wednesday, May 18        6:00 p.m.           Oracle Arena                        TNT         KGO 810 / KTCT 1050 / ESPN Radio

GAME 3        Sunday, May 22                5:00 p.m.           Chesapeake Energy Arena  TNT          KGO 810 / KTCT 1050 / ESPN Radio

GAME 4        Tuesday, May 24              6:00 p.m.           Chesapeake Energy Arena  TNT          KGO 810 / KTCT 1050 / ESPN Radio

GAME 5*     Thursday, May 26           6:00 p.m.           Oracle Arena                        TNT         KNBR 680 / ESPN Radio

GAME 6*      Saturday, May 28             6:00 p.m.           Chesapeake Energy Arena  TNT          KNBR 680 / ESPN Radio

GAME 7*     Monday, May 30              6:00 p.m.           Oracle Arena                        TNT         KNBR 680 / ESPN Radio"

May 11, 16

"One of the oldest business models in the world is using new technology to trample traditional businesses, drive innovation, and create new and immense sources of value. Matchmakers, the subject of our new book, make it easy for two or more groups of customers, like drivers and riders in the case of Uber, to get together and do business. They operate platforms that make it easy and efficient for participants to connect and exchange value.

Unlike traditional businesses, they don’t buy inputs, make stuff, and sell it. Instead, they recruit participants, and then sell each group of participants access to the other group of participants. The “participants” are the “inputs” that they use to produce the intermediation service they provide.

Today, we’re living in the matchmaker economy. It is a bigger and more pervasive part of our lives than many imagine.

Three of the five most highly valued companies in the world — Apple, Google, and Microsoft — make much of their profits from connecting different groups, like developers and users in the case of Apple. So do seven of the most valuable unicorns — startups worth more than $1 billion in their latest funding round — such as Uber, Airbnb, and Flipkart. And then many other companies that have IPO’d in the last decade, like Visa, which connects cardholders and merchants, and Facebook, which connects friends, advertisers, and developers.

And it’s not just these humongous companies. Westfield Malls operates shopping malls that help retailers and shoppers to get together. Then there are all the ad-supported media that troll for eyeballs so they can sell them to marketers.

In fact, if you think about, as a consumer and a worker, you probably use multiple matchmakers throughout your day, from the operating system on your phone, to an exchange for trading stock, to a dating app for finding a mate.

The firms that make up the gig economy and the sharing economy — the new darlings — are matchmakers too. Gig economy companies connect workers with consumers who need them, such as home care workers with families that need help, while sharing economy ones match up unused capacity, like automobiles, with people who want to rent them.

All matchmakers play by similar rules. But the rules are different than those for traditional firms.

Matchmakers have to solve the hardest problem in business — a critical mass of two or more groups of participants who value the service will sign on only if they can get access to the other groups of participants.

"

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May 08, 16

"Remix OS is an Android based portable mobile operating system works similar like Windows, OS X and Linux (Ubuntu) desktop operating systems. Remix user interface comes with user-friendly options, features and functions i.e. minimize, maximize and close buttons on every program or software screens, start menu button on desktop home screen, taskbar, windows with title bar, multitasking in multi-windows, notification center, regular software updates etc. Some pre-installed android apps and games such as; Google Play Store, Google Chrome, Microsoft Office, E-Mail App, Twitter, Pinterest, Facebook, Evernote, Keyboard, Advanced File Manager and lots more. Remix OS users can even use mouse similar to Windows, OS X and Linux (Ubuntu) to perform operations like; double-click, left-click or right-click. As currently, Android is officially available for Smartphones and Tablets devices only, being an open-source, Remix OS is very useful for developers, testers and general public users to experience latest Android platform on bigger display screens."

May 07, 16

"In Ray Bradbury’s classic dystopian novel, “Fahrenheit 451,” a future society criminalizes the possession of books and burns them in order to suppress any dissenting ideas, opinions, and views. Today, we have state attorneys general trying to implement their own version of “Fahrenheit 451” to criminalize dissent over a disputed, unproven scientific theory: man-induced climate change.

Recently, the attorney general of the Virgin Islands, Claude Walker, unleashed a subpoena on the Competitive Enterprise Institute seeking 10 years’ worth of research and communications about climate change.

It turns out that same Grand Inquisitor, Claude Walker, has hit ExxonMobil with a similar subpoena that seeks all of that company’s communications, conversations, and correspondence with 88 conservative and libertarian think tanks, foundations, and universities, and 54 individual researchers, scientists, and writers."

  • violate “constitutionally protected rights of freedom of speech, freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures, and due process of law and constitute the common law tort of abuse of process.”
  • ExxonMobil also alleges that Walker’s delegation of his prosecutorial power to a private law firm “likely on a contingency-fee basis” violates basic “due process of law and fundamental fairness,” particularly because that same law firm has “pursued a bitterly contested and contentious litigation in an unrelated lawsuit against ExxonMobil … which could result in a substantial fee award if Cohen Milstein’s client were to prevail.”
  • That raises “substantial doubts about whether that firm should be permitted to serve as the ‘disinterested prosecutor’ whose impartiality is demanded by law and expected by the public.”

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May 07, 16

"In the week prior to the administration signing what should constitute an international climate treaty, one think tank, the Competitive Enterprise Institute, was subpoenaed for casting doubt on the agreement’s associated science of climate catastrophe.

As disturbing as such thuggery from state attorneys general would be in any case, the premise of the subpoena is faulty. The Competitive Enterprise Institute did not cast doubt on the dubious climate science. The actual data cast the doubt. The think tank and others have simply pointed out what the data show.

It looks like thoughtcrime has now moved from George Orwell’s novel “1984” to the twisted reality of our judicial system. Pointing out facts should never be a real crime.

The Heritage Foundation’s new Paris-bubble-popping science summary is also a case of letting the numbers tell a story. A story many never hear in the media-hyped spectacle that is international climate policy."

  • For instance, the chart above shows reconstructed average world temperature data for the past 500,000 years. Depending on the magnification and size of your monitor, each pencil dot would span something on the order of 1,000 years. The myriad 10-degree Celsius temperature flips all happened before man-made carbon dioxide could have had any impact—the final temperature spike started at the end of the last ice age.

     

  • Now see if you can follow this: The “science thought police” insist that even though none of the temperature variations for the first 499,950 years had anything to do with human activity, virtually none of the temperature increases of the past 50 years had anything to do with nature. Got it?
May 06, 16

"More and more, Donald Trump seems to us at least partially an extension of the Tea Party movement that the US mainstream media declared dead a few years ago.

Whether Trump wins or not, or whether his campaign and then his presidency is considered a “success” is in a sense incidental.

The larger question, (and this Bloomberg article addresses it in its own way) is one that we used to ask with some regularity: Are Western elites going to have to take a step back?
From a social, political, economic and investment perspective, what will the West and the world look like if the quasi-libertarian impulse represented by Trump and the Tea Party somehow emerge victorious in the US?

What Trump represents is like an incoming tide. You can divert it or dam it momentarily but it will not be halted in the longer term. It will reach its destination, whatever that is.

We’ve written a number of articles, for instance, pointing out that one of the unfortunate results of the Trump candidacy may be to inflame tensions between Hispanics and white, Western culture.

The idea is that these tensions can lead to a rapprochement that reignites a previous movement to further align and consolidate Mexican and US economies and even sociopolitical elements.

Additionally, some Trump statements have an authoritarian and populist ring to them that seem to indicate a Trump presidency would reinforce certain oppressive and anti-freedom aspects federal power.

But as Trump approaches, potentially, a successful destination, the ramifications of what he has accomplished – and may yet accomplish – should be considered seriously by anyone living in the US or affected by Western power."

  • The larger question, (and this Bloomberg article addresses it in its own way) is one that we used to ask with some regularity: Are Western elites going to have to take a step back?
  • What it construes as  a “cultural retreat” is actually a manifestation of both a free society and representative democracy.
  • Indeed this conflict will likely present itself ever-more powerfully throughout the 21st century. It is the conflict between globalism and freedom.

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May 05, 16

" remember the days before smartphones when managing your contact list was a herculean task. I used to maintain a notebook where I would add phone numbers, email IDs and physical addresses. But people change their contact info all the time and it was close to impossible to keep up.


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When we moved to smartphones, the physical address book was gone and along with it the crossed out or hastily erased names and numbers, but the challenges of staying updated remained.

I had been looking for a solution where some magical app will keep my address book updated and keep my friends and colleagues informed of my latest contact details without having to send spam mails to everyone I could remember.

Then I found addappt, a new way to make your addressbook as smart as is your smartphone.

I spoke with addappt founder Mrinal Desai to learn about his background, how the app came to be and how it works.

Desai was a very early LinkedIn employee (employee number 15, to be precise). He was LinkedIn's first business development manager. “LinkedIn is basically who I am offline. I build relationships over years and years and I believe that is the way to live life, based on very full and enriching relationships.” said Desai.

The problem Desai is trying to solve with addappt twofold: On one hand the onus is on the person who is moving to inform "everyone" about the move and send them updated information. On the other hand, you have to keep your address book updated every time someone changes contact info. There were two constantly moving goal posts to chase.

"It started getting harder and harder, so for me to get the latest information. One, I have to depend on you, hopefully that you will remember to email me or all your friends in a mass spam-ish way, if you will. Then, I go take it in and I have to remember to now update somebody's information in my contacts,” said Desai.

In the age of smartphones, managing contact info manually is an an extremely inefficient way to do that. “That was frustrating me because I was having to do this over and over again, whenever possible. I was having a lot of outdated information in my contacts. With the advent of smartphones and everything that is happening with so much cool stuff that is available with the platforms, it just didn't make any sense for the contact list not to adapt," said Desai."

    • How it works

      When you install the addappt app on your device and verify your email ID, the app stores your profile information on its server. You profile includes only that information that you added to your own profile, including phone numbers, email IDs, physical address, social network. And you can selectively make any property private at anytime. 

      The second step is to get your friends on addappt. You can send invites to your friends and when they join addappt their profile is uploaded to the sever. 

      The app automatically helps people connect using the verified email or verified mobile so all your friends need to do is download addappt and make sure they have one of your emails or mobile. 

                                                                                                                             
       
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      Now the magic begins. Addappt will sync your profile with your friends' address books and vice versa. Now when you change anything in your profile on your own phone, it will sync those changes in your friends' address books. No need to send bulk emails or messages. 

      This puts you in control of your information. You determine which is the preferred phone number to or email address to reach you at. Ane addappt also remembers the number you called last and will automatically dial it. Since often we have different channels of communicating with different folks, the app also remembers how you communicated last with someone (i.e., it "adapts" to you).

  • Cool features

    One feature that is extremely important from a privacy point of view is that addappt uploads only the profile that you added in your address book, stuff like your phone number, email ID, LinkedIn profile, physical address -- whatever you choose and nothing else. No contacts from your address book are uploaded to the sever. Also, and very importantly, your connections never see your other connections and you can’t see theirs. It is all private. 

    I recently discovered another interesting feature of addappt when I was travelling to India and had a local number there. Previously I would have to bulk email hundreds of people in my address book to give them my new, temporary number, only to change it again 4 weeks later. With addappt, I updated my profile and added the temporary local number and, boom,  everyone who was connected with me via addappt had my new local number instantly. When I came back to the U.S., I removed the temporary number from my profile and it automatically removed it from my friends’ address books. 

    And unlike some popular social networking sites, if you quit addappt, your contacts will remain on your device. What you will lose is the ability to keep syncing your contacts. That’s it.

  • New features

    Addappt recently introduced Widgets so your favorite contacts are now available on iOS and Android from anywhere on the phone and you don’t have to open the app. They require no setting and they are live since addappt remembers how you communicated last. They reorder, get removed or added just as within the app. 

    You can also message your friends with one “tapp.” 

    On iOS, you can email URLs from your browser to yourself using the action extension. 

    You can group  contacts very easily and then send a group email, group chat or a group “tapp". Addappt’s  one "tapp" messaging is also available on the Apple Watch. 

    Addappt makes it much easier to share your contact info with people you meet at conferences, for example with a feature called Share My Info.

  • That's why customers are largely choosing which cloud to go to by their own "business logic," not the underlying technology, says James Watters, Vice President and General Manager at Pivotal — a Dell/EMC company and a partner to Google, Microsoft, and Amazon.
  •  James Watters, Vice President and General Manager at Pivotal — a Dell/EMC company and a partner to Google, Microsoft, and Amazon.
  • Pivotal Field CTO Joshua McKenty says it's seeing some of its (unnamed) customers in that industry jump ship from Amazon Web Services.

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May 05, 16

"When you use Google, you are making a deal. You get to use services like Gmail, Drive, search, YouTube, and Google Maps for free.
In exchange, you agree to share information about yourself that Google can share with advertisers so their ads are more effective. For instance, airlines want to target people who love to travel. Children's clothing makers want to target parents.

Google uses a lot of methods to learn about you. There's the stuff you tell Google outright when you sign up for its Gmail or to use your Android phone. This includes your name, phone number, location, and so on.

But Google also watches you as you scamper around the internet, deducing your interests from your internet searches — what do you search for? click on? — from your use of Google's other services and from other websites you visit.

By visiting a hard-to-find page called "Web & App Activity," you can see what Google is watching.

Then by visiting a site called "Ads Settings," you can see what Google thinks it knows about you, and you can change what it's telling advertisers about you.
Read on for the details:"

May 05, 16

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Google uses a lot of methods to learn about you. There's the stuff you tell Google outright when you sign up for its Gmail or to use your Android phone. This includes your name, phone number, location, and so on.

But Google also watches you as you scamper around the internet, deducing your interests from your internet searches — what do you search for? click on? — from your use of Google's other services and from other websites you visit.

By visiting a hard-to-find page called "Web & App Activity," you can see what Google is watching.

Then by visiting a site called "Ads Settings," you can see what Google thinks it knows about you, and you can change what it's telling advertisers about you.

  • “We’ve integrated with Google and email, and we have customer information from your CRM,” Britton says. “Imagine a world where you have an assistant helping you do your job. ‘I see you had four meetings yesterday, with Nike and Coca-Cola. It’s been 48 hours and you haven’t emailed them or followed up … And a manager could set those parameters too.”
  • This will help both managers and sales reps, the founders say. “Managers spend half their time playing zoo keeper and babysitter, and the rep feels like an idiot for [forgetting something and] not doing their job.” With Troops, the manager just has to put in the parameters once, and the bot does the rest.
  • The plan is to give the product away to consumers first, and then add a premium paid tier later.
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