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about 2 hours ago

"Effort led by French priest, who speaks Tuesday at Marquette
By Annysa Johnson of the Journal Sentinel
April 19, 2015

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Associated Press
Anatoly Veliminchuk (left) speaks in 2007 with Desbois about the massacre of tens of thousands Jews he witnessed in the early years of the war in Bogdanivka, Ukraine.
Photo by Ken Buchholz, courtesy of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation
A 17-foot stainless steel sculpture of a shofar by Milwaukee-area artist Richard Edelman will be installed in the old quarter of Krakow during a visit by a delegation from Milwaukee's Jewish community in September.

They are gruesomely documented, the horrors visited on the 6 million Jews killed in the concentration camps and gas chambers of Nazi Germany.

A lesser known piece of that macabre history is the estimated 2 million or more who died, often slowly and agonizingly, one bullet at a time, at the hands of the Einsatzgruppen, the Ordnungspolizei and others.

These were the Order Police and Nazi mobile killing units that rounded up Jews, Roma and others in the towns and villages across Eastern Europe, herding them into pits, executing them and often burying them alive.

A French Catholic priest, the Rev. Patrick Desbois, has spent the last 15 years combing archives and interviewing witnesses to document these largely unknown massacres.

Now Milwaukee's Jewish community has raised $150,000 to finance a Yahad-In Unum research expedition near Krakow, Poland. And a group of about 20 will travel there in September to honor the dead.

"Father Desbois is one of my personal heroes," said Hannah Rosenthal, president and CEO of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation, which is organizing the delegation and co-sponsoring a Tuesday lecture by Desbois at Marquette University.

"He is an incredible priest, who has made it his life's work ... his mission, to find the mass graves of murdered Jews — and by the way he has also found mass graves of Roma — which nobody knows were there," she said. "He's a remarkable man."

Desbois is founder and president of the Paris-based Yahad-In Unum — meaning "together," or "one," in Hebrew and Latin — which has mounted almost 100 expeditions in eight countries, including Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, Poland and Romania.

He stumbled onto the work while tracing the history of his own grandfather, who was deported to a Soviet camp in Ukraine during the war. While visiting the village where his grandfather was interned, Desbois discovered that 18,000 Jews had been killed there.

"It took three, four years to find the graves," Desbois said in a telephone interview from Los Angeles, where he gave a lecture last week. "Nobody wanted to speak."

Since the group's founding in 2004, Desbois' teams have interviewed more than 4,000 eyewitnesses and located about 1,700 extermination sites containing the remains of 1.3 million Jews — from the grave of a starving family of four, including the father who begged the SS soldiers to end their misery, to a vast killing field in northern Odessa that is believed to hold 45,000 dead.

They cross-reference German and Soviet archives. (Soviets tended to document locations, and Germans details about the killers.) And they build a file with maps for each village. Once there, they go door-to-door looking for witnesses.

The videos of interviews are gut-wrenching: elderly people speaking through translators, often for the first time, recounting the incomprehensible carnage. In one, filmed in Ukraine, a man breaks down, remembering the children who died there.

"I can't tell," he says, as he composes himself, and then goes on. "The children, thrown into the pit by hand."

In another, an elderly woman wipes the tears from her eyes.

"Passing in front of the church," she says, "somebody screamed, 'Holy church, save us!'

"It was a torture, an incredible horror," she says. "God save us. The Jews were our friends."

Desbois' team does not excavate the sites because Orthodox Judaism prohibits disturbing the grave. In addition to the interviews, they look for ballistic evidence, such as bullet shells, and jewelry. They do not mark the grave, for fear of grave robbers.

Yahad-In Unum's work is as much about the future as it is the past, said Desbois. The Nazi murders, which often left no trace, were "the model for the modern genocide" that has continued to plague the planet into the 21st century, in Iraq, Darfur, Syria, Kenya and elsewhere.

"You cannot build a democracy on mass graves," said Desbois, author of the 2009 book "The Holocaust by Bullets: A Priest's Journey to Uncover the Truth Behind the Murder of 1.5 Million Jews" — a number he has since revised.

"We are trying to train a new generation to prevent this disease of genocide," he said.

Rosenthal met Desbois during her tenure at the U.S. State Department, where she served as special envoy to monitor and combat anti-Semitism before joining the federation in 2012. The State Department honored him in 2011, and a photo from that ceremony graces a bookshelf in her Prospect Ave. office.

"I always wanted, especially after coming to Milwaukee, to find a way to hire him to do the research, to find out where Jews were rounded up and murdered, and we would go and dedicate that sacred ground," she said.

The Milwaukee gift will finance a 17-day expedition in villages near Krakow, according to Desbois.

During the September visit, which is being billed as a week of remembrance and renewal, the Milwaukee delegation will say the mourner's Kaddish, the Jewish prayers for the dead, at the yet-unknown grave site. They will go on to visit Auschwitz and other sites, and then unveil a 17-foot sculpture of a shofar by Milwaukee-area artist Richard Edelman in the old Jewish quarter of Krakow.

Among those planning to go is Nancy Kennedy Barnett, whose father was born in Budapest and lost most of his family. She grew up scanning the gaunt faces in photographs from the Holocaust looking for anyone who looked like her.

"You never know whose grave we're going to find. It could be my grandparents' ... or other relatives," Barnett said. "And if it isn't my family's, it could be their neighbors. It's important to be a witness to this."
IF YOU GO

The Rev. Patrick Desbois will discuss "Holocaust by Bullets" at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Marquette University's Eckstein Hall, 1215 W. Michigan St. The lecture is open to the public, but an RSVP is required. Registration is available online or by calling (414) 288-4731.
About Annysa Johnson

Annysa Johnson is an award-winning reporter covering faith and spirituality in southeastern Wisconsin"

about 5 hours ago

" We are honored to be the institutional home of this spectacular collection.
Deborah Jakubs
Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs

The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection: Overview

The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection documents women’s work, broadly conceived, from the mid-fifteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. In Baskin’s own words, “The unifying thread is that women have always been productive and working people and this history essentially has been hidden.” This collection brings women’s contributions across the centuries to light.

Carefully assembled over 45 years by noted bibliophile, activist and collector Lisa Unger Baskin, the collection includes more than 8,600 rare books and thousands of manuscripts, journals, ephemera and artifacts. Among the works are many well-known monuments of women’s history and literature, as well as lesser-known works produced by female scholars, printers, publishers, scientists, artists and political activists. Taken together, they comprise a mosaic of the ways that women have been productive, creative, and socially engaged over more than 500 years.

The materials range in date from a 1240 manuscript documenting a respite home for women in Italy to a large collection of letters and manuscripts by the 20th-century anarchist Emma Goldman. The majority of the materials were created between the mid-15th and mid-20th centuries. Other significant items include correspondence by legendary American and English suffragists and abolitionists Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Emmeline Pankhurst and Lucretia Mott; Harriet Beecher Stowe’s publicity blurb for Sojourner Truth’s Narrative, written in Stowe’s own hand; exquisite decorated bindings by the celebrated turn-of-the-century British binders Sarah Prideaux, Katharine Adams, and Sybil Pye; and English writer Virginia Woolf’s writing desk, which she designed herself. A few highlights from the collection are described in this website.

Baskin and her late husband, the artist Leonard Baskin, were both avid book collectors. Leonard also founded The Gehenna Press, one of the preeminent American private presses of the 20th century. Lisa Unger Baskin began collecting materials on women’s history in the 1960s after attending Cornell University. She is a member of the Grolier Club, the oldest American society of bibliophiles.

“I am delighted that my collection will be available to students, scholars and the community at Duke University, a great teaching and research institution,” Baskin said. “Because of Duke’s powerful commitment to the central role of libraries, and digitization in teaching, it is clear to me that my collection will be an integral part of the university in the coming years and long into the future. I trust that this new and exciting life for my books and manuscripts will help to transform and enlarge the notion of what history is about, deeply reflecting my own interests.”

Materials from the collection will be available to researchers once they have been cataloged. Some items will be on display in the renovated Rubenstein Library when it reopens to the public at the end of August 2015."

about 6 hours ago

"New Duke Library Collection Spans Five Centuries of Women’s History

Rubenstein Library acquires massive, influential private collection
April 20, 2015 |
print |

Article

Virginia Woolf's writing desk, painted by her nephew Quentin Bell.

Durham, NC - The David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University has acquired one of the largest and most significant private collections on women’s history, documenting the work and intellectual contributions of women from the Renaissance to the modern era.

Carefully assembled over 45 years by noted bibliophile, activist and collector Lisa Unger Baskin, the collection includes more than 8,600 rare books and thousands of manuscripts, journals, ephemera and artifacts, including author Virginia Woolf’s writing desk.

Among the works are many well-known monuments of women’s history and literature, as well as lesser-known works produced by female scholars, printers, publishers, scientists, artists and political activists. Taken together, they comprise a mosaic of the ways women have been productive, creative, and socially engaged over more than 500 years. The collection will become a part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture within the Rubenstein Library.

“We are honored to be the institutional home of this spectacular collection,” said Deborah Jakubs, Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs. “Lisa Baskin’s lifelong passion for collecting and preserving women’s history resonates deeply with us at Duke. Her approach to collection building is a kind of activism itself, and in that respect it shares much in common with our own. Throughout our history, the Duke University Libraries have strived to build collections that document lives and achievements that would otherwise be hidden from history.”

The materials range in date from a 1240 manuscript documenting a respite home for women in Italy to a large collection of letters and manuscripts by the 20th-century anarchist Emma Goldman. Most materials were created between the mid-15th and mid-20th centuries. Other highlights include correspondence by legendary American and English suffragists and abolitionists Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Emmeline Pankhurst and Lucretia Mott; Harriet Beecher Stowe’s publicity blurb for Narrative of Sojourner Truth, written with Stowe’s own hand; decorated bindings by the celebrated turn-of-the-century British binders Sarah Prideaux, Katharine Adams and Sybil Pye; and Woolf’s writing desk, which the author designed herself.

“Lisa Baskin’s remarkable collection aligns perfectly with the strengths and character of the Rubenstein Library,” said Naomi Nelson, associate university librarian and director of the Rubenstein Library. “We pride ourselves on our signature collections in women’s history and culture, African American history, the history of medicine, human rights, documentary arts, advertising and economics -- all areas Lisa has attended to in building her collection. We look forward to collaborating with her as we add to the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection and share it with the public. ”

Baskin and her late husband, the artist Leonard Baskin, were both avid book collectors. Leonard also founded The Gehenna Press, one of the preeminent American private presses of the 20th century. Lisa Unger Baskin began collecting materials on women’s history in the 1960s after attending Cornell University. She is a member of the Grolier Club, the oldest American society for bibliophiles.

“I am delighted that my collection will be available to students, scholars and the community at Duke University, a great teaching and research institution,” Baskin said. “Because of Duke’s powerful commitment to the central role of libraries, and digitization in teaching, it is clear to me that my collection will be an integral part of the university in the coming years and long into the future. I trust that this new and exciting life for my books and manuscripts will help to transform and enlarge the notion of what history is about, deeply reflecting my own interests.”

Materials from the collection will be available to researchers once they have been cataloged. Some items will be on display in the renovated Rubenstein Library when it reopens to the public at the end of August 2015.

For more information about the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection visit http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/bingham/lisa-unger-baskin."

about 13 hours ago

"Calls for sanctions were resisted by German Jews and many in pre-state Israel. Newly uncovered documents reveal the passions and arguments surrounding the controversy."

about 13 hours ago

"Listen to the Story

Morning Edition
4 min 51 sec

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Katherine Streeter for NPR
Katherine Streeter for NPR

It's another busy morning at Dr. Anthony Aurigemma's homeopathy practice in Bethesda, Md.

Wendy Resnick, 58, is here because she's suffering from a nasty bout of laryngitis. "I don't feel great," she says. "I don't feel myself."

The traditional treatments just weren't helping me at all.

- Nancy Resnick

Resnick, who lives in Millersville, Md., has been seeing Aurigemma for years for a variety of health problems, including ankle and knee injuries and back problems. "I don't know what I would do without him," she says. "The traditional treatments just weren't helping me at all."

Aurigemma listens to Resnick's lungs, checks her throat and then asks detailed questions about her symptoms and other things as well, such as whether she's been having any unusual cravings for food.

Aurigemma went to medical school and practiced as a regular doctor before switching to homeopathy more than 30 years ago. He says he got disillusioned by mainstream medicine because of the side effects caused by many drugs. "I don't reject conventional medicine. I use it when I have to," Aurigemma says.
In 2005, the British medical journal The Lancet attacked the use of homeopathic treatments saying that doctors should be honest about homeopathy's lack of benefit.
13.7: Cosmos And Culture
Is Homeopathy A Sham?

Throughout his career, homeopathy has been regulated differently from mainstream medicine.

In 1988, the Food and Drug Administration decided not to require homeopathic remedies to go through the same drug-approval process as standard medical treatments. Now the FDA is revisiting that decision. It will hold two days of hearings this week to decide if homeopathic remedies should have to be proven safe and effective.

There is no question that it helps patients.

- Dr Aurigemma

When Aurigemma is finished examining his patient, instead of pulling out a prescription pad, he uses a thick book to come up with a homeopathic diagnosis. He then searches through heavy wooden drawers filled with rows of small brown glass vials filled with tiny white pellets. They're homeopathic remedies. He pulls out two.

"So this will be the first dose," he says. "Then I'll give you a daily dose, to try to get underneath into your immune system to try to help you strengthen your energy, basically."

Homeopathic medicine has long been controversial. It's based on an idea known as "like cures like," which means if you give somebody a dose of a substance — such as a plant or a mineral — that can cause the symptoms of their illness, it can, in theory, cure that illness if the substance has been diluted so much that it's essentially no longer in the dose.

Homeopathy is an excellent example of the purest form of pseudoscience.

- Dr. Steven Novella

"We believe that there is a memory left in the solution. You might call it a memory. You might call it energy," Aurigemma says. "Each substance in nature has a certain set of characteristics. And when a patient comes who matches the physical, mental and emotional symptoms that a remedy produces — that medicine may heal the person's problem."

Critics say those ideas are nonsense, and that study after study has failed to find any evidence that homeopathy works.

"Homeopathy is an excellent example of the purest form of pseudoscience," says Steven Novella, a neurologist at Yale and executive editor of the website Science-Based Medicine. "These are principles that are not based upon science.""

about 14 hours ago

"Leftists, however, who do not share the anti-Zionist contempt for Israel, and who know a thing or two about the Arab-Israel conflict, will usually acknowledge that the failure of the Oslo process and Arafat's unleashing of the Second Intifada played a big role in moving Israel toward the political right. Anyone who understands the history of the conflict knows that during the 1990s, when Arafat and Ehud Barak and Bill Clinton were sitting around the big table, there was considerable optimism within Israel that they would be able to broker a negotiated settlement with the local Arabs and thus bring peace to the region.

It all seemed so rational and sensible, after all. The notion of land for peace seemed like it should work. Give the Palestinian-Arabs 100 percent of Gaza, nearly 100 percent of Judea and Samaria in a contiguous area with land swaps, and the Arab sections of eastern Jerusalem as a capital. When Arafat rejected this more than generous offer, refused to make a counter offer, and unleashed the equivalent of 9/11 every two weeks for over three years upon the Jews of the Middle East, those Jews became demoralized with the non-peace process and thus began to move toward the right.

Would anyone expect anything else? It is just so easy to sit in our comfortable offices, houses, and apartments in the United States, almost completely safe within one of the largest and most powerful countries on the planet, and lecture those Jews, in that tiny beleaguered nation, on morality and politics. The Second Intifada destroyed the Israeli left because the Oslo peace process was the baby of the western left and it led to nothing but violence, death, and a furious denunciation of Israel. Between 2000 and 2005, the Palestinians launched a civil war against the Jews, featuring suicide bombings.

Thus it was that Israel turned away from Meretz and Labor and began to look more and more toward Likud and right-leaning political parties. What virtually no one acknowledges, however, is that a major part of the reason that Israelis rejected the left is because it was during the height of the Second Intifada, the height of the Palestinian orgy of violence and killing of Jews in the Middle East, that the left's hatred for Israel reached toward hysteria, as Paul Berman has pointed out. As Jews were being slaughtered in pizzerias by fools who wanted to die for their religion, western leftists were jumping up and down, pointing the trembling finger of blame at those Jews, and telling them that IT IS ALL YOUR FAULT!

Israelis, for the most part, are not stupid people. They know who their friends are and they know who their friends are not. When the western left turned against Israel and laid the entire blame for the conflict on the Jews of the Middle East, even as those Jews were being slaughtered in a frenzy of Palestinian violence, Israelis came to understand the international left was, if anything, their enemy. It came to look more and more like the western left was simply siding with the Arabs in their ongoing war against the Jews.

So, naturally Israelis moved to the right.

By essentially siding with suicide bombers and Jihadis and Hamas, the western left killed the Israeli left.

The question for left-leaning diaspora Jews today is, do we side with Israel or do we stick with left?"

about 16 hours ago

"

Ist der Massenmord an den Armeniern vor 100 Jahren ein Völkermord gewesen? Die Fraktionsspitzen von Union und SPD haben sich nun auf eine Formulierung geeinigt, in der der Begriff zumindest vorkommt.
Auch die Bundesregierung stellt sich hinter die Formulierung des Resolutionsentwurfs.
Das Auswärtige Amt hatte sich lange dagegen gewehrt, dass der Begriff des Völkermords in der Resolution auftaucht. In der SZ hatte Außenminister Steinmeier allerdings ein Einlenken signalisiert.
Die Verwendung des Begriffs könnte womöglich zu Verstimmungen zwischen Ankara und Berlin führen."

about 17 hours ago

"Mellow Pastimes Can Be Good For Your Health, Too
April 20, 2015 3:48 AM ET
Patricia Neighmond
Patti Neighmond
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Listen to the Story

Morning Edition
1 min 46 sec

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Painting

Painting
iStockphoto

This makes total sense: when you're engaged in an activity you truly enjoy, you're happy. And, when you're happy you're not dwelling on all the negative things in life, nor are you stressed about obligations or problems. Certainly this is a good thing from an emotional point of view, but it also has physical benefits.

We know exercise reduces stress, but it turns out that more simple stationary things, like doing puzzles, painting or sewing can help, too.

To find that out, Matthew Zawadzki, an assistant professor of psychology with the University of California, Merced, looked at how the body reacts to leisure activities, defined as anything a person does in his or her free time.
Is there anyone who can resist dancing when Pharrell Williams sings "Happy"? Yes, if you're one of the rare few with specific musical anhedonia.
Shots - Health News
Strange But True: Music Doesn't Make Some People Happy

In the study, 115 men and women from different racial groups, ages 20 to 80, were asked to wear little electrodes attached to their chest which measured heart rate throughout the experiment. They were then monitored over the course of three consecutive days, taking surveys at random times throughout the day. The survey questions included what they were doing at that very moment and how they felt about it.

Virtually all the participants showed reduced stress and heart rate during their leisure activities. In some cases that included exercise, but in many cases it was simple stationary things like listening to music, doing puzzles, sewing, even watching movies or TV. They were 34 percent less stressed, 18 percent less sad and their heart rate dropped, on average, by 3 percent.
A still from a quirky animation exploring some of the ways we relieve stress.
Shots - Health News
Dialing Back Stress With A Bubble Bath, Beach Trip And Bees

The positive benefits of leisure activities even appeared to persist for hours after the activity itself ended.

"We're still talking about the short term, but there was a definite carryover effect later in the day," says Zawadzki, "and if we start thinking about that beneficial carryover effect day after day, year after year, it starts to make sense how leisure can help improve health in the long term."

When a person is stressed, "their body is worked up – heart rate, blood pressure, hormones – so the more we can prevent this overworked state, the less of a load it builds up," he says.
Grid of sticky notes with To Do lists on them.
Author Interviews
For Working Moms, Key To Balance May Lie In Elusive Leisure Time

You could think of this as a sort of mental escape. When you're totally engaged in and enjoying what you're doing, you don't have time to ruminate and worry. You also don't have time to get bored. And boredom, says Zawadzki, can be dangerous.

"There's something called 'boredom eating'," he says, "where people just binge on junk food as a way to distract themselves. We'll often watch TV passively for hours at a time, rather than actively engage or really think about it. People smoke, drink, do drugs when they're bored."

So the next time you're absorbed in a good book or a good movie, or even just listening to your favorite music, remember you're not only enjoying yourself. You're helping your health."

about 18 hours ago

"Printing

By the 9th century, Chinese craftsmen had developed a way to mass produce books by carving words and pictures into wooden blocks, inking them, and then pressing paper onto the blocks. Each block consisted of an entire page of text and illustrations.
Examples of printing woodblock and woodblock-printed book (top)
and bronze movable type blocks and movable-type-block-printed book (bottom) from the National Palace Museum.
Click on the image to get more information about the objects from the NPM website.



As in Europe centuries later, the introduction of printing in China dramatically lowered the price of books, thus aiding the spread of literacy. Inexpensive books also gave a boost to the development of drama and other forms of popular culture. The storytellers depicted in the Beijing Qingming scroll (below) may have benefited from “prompt books” that would help them review the stories that they told orally to their audiences.


Slide Show Image
Slide Show Image
A storyteller entertaining a crowd, Beijing qingming scroll



Movable Type

In the 11th century movable type (one piece of type for each character) was invented. Movable type was never widely used in China because whole-block printing was less expensive, but when movable type reached Europe in the 15th century, it revolutionized the communication of ideas.

Movable type was first created by Bi Sheng (990-1051), who used baked clay, which was very fragile. The Yuan-dynasty official Wang Zhen is credited with the introduction of wooden movable type, a more durable option, around 1297.(1) Cast-metal movable type began to be used in Korea in the early 13th century, and the first font is believed to have been cast there in the 1230s."

about 18 hours ago

"The Holocaust revealed not only the extraordinary evil of people—but also the extraordinary good. Feng-Shan Ho is the perfect example of the latter. Ho served as the Chinese Consul-General in Vienna from 1938 to 1940 and, during his tenure, was able to rescue thousands of Jews.

In the aftermath of Kristallnacht, the fate of Austria’s 200,000 Jews was extremely tenuous. Disobeying direct orders from his superior, Ho began issuing exit visas to Shanghai for Jews looking to flee Austria. In his first three months as Consul-General, he was able to issue 1,200 visas.

Though Shanghai didn’t require a visa for entrance, Austria required one for exit. Many of Ho’s Jews settled in Hong Kong and Australia, as well as Italy, Palestine, the Philippines, and elsewhere. He continued to issue visas for as long as he could to the Jews who waited in long lines outside the Chinese consulate—until he was pulled back to China in 1940. An exact number isn’t known, but in his first half-year alone, Ho had written nearly 2,000 visas.

Eventually Ho retired to San Francisco in the 1970s, though it wasn’t until after his death in 1997 that his heroic actions were recognized by the world. And in 2000, Ho was given the official recognition as a Righteous Among the Nations."

about 18 hours ago

"In November 2009, the topic of the annual conference of the European Society for Textual Scholarship was Texts beyond Borders: Multilingualism and Textual Scholarship (19-21 November 2009). The logo of the conference was Peter Brueghel the Elder’s image of the Tower of Babel, the so-called little version (kept at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam).

At this and following conferences, the need was expressed by several members of ESTS to create a lexicon of scholarly editing similar to undertakings in different disciplines and editorial traditions, and in different linguistic areas, a nice example being the French Dictionnaire de critique génétique (edited by Daniel Ferrer, Lydie Rauzier and Aurèle Crasson). Given the divergence of traditions, languages and contexts, such an undertaking is almost ‘doomed to fail’ from the start – to quote Samuel Beckett.

Towards a Lexicon of Scholarly Editing

But Beckett is also the author of that other quote: ‘Fail better.’ Under this motto, this lexicon was initiated in November 2012 by the European Society for Textual Scholarship (ESTS) and the Centre for Manuscript Genetics (part of the research group Literature and Modernity, University of Antwerp), as part of ESTS’s aim to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for the theory and practice of textual scholarship in Europe.

Its aim is not to create new definitions, but to gather existing definitions for every entry in the lexicon. Many of these concepts have given rise to lively debates in the past and several eminent scholars have made courageous attempts to define them in monographs or scholarly journals. Every entry will be defined by means of one or more quotations from giants, offering their shoulders to future generations to stand on.

All quotations are referenced and the text from which they derive can be found in the bibliography. Although the lingua franca of the ESTS and of this lexicon is English, the definitions do not need to be restricted to quotations from articles or monographs in English.

All suggestions for updates are very welcome. New entries or other definitions can be added on the Contribute page. New contributions will be presented to the lexicon’s editors. Once accepted, new updates to the site will also be added to the News blog."

about 18 hours ago

"[The following press release was issued by The National Associate of Chicana and Chicano Studies on 19 April 2015]

The National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies Annual Conference took place in San Francisco from April 15-18, 2015. The business meeting, open to all members, took place on Saturday evening at the close of the conference. At the business meeting, the membership gave unanimous support to the Resolution to Support the Boycott of Israeli Academic Institutions. In addition, individual FOCOS (regional caucuses) and interest group Caucuses all voted to support the resolution.

The resolution follows:"

about 18 hours ago

"
Critical Acclaim

“Gil Troy’s volume on the late Daniel Patrick Moynihan is superb. It demonstrates his power of critical analysis as well as his commitment to what is eternal and noble in Jewishness.” —Elie Wiesel

“…reveals the full extent of Moynihan’s leadership, intellect, and integrity. Those qualities are sorely missed in the ongoing battles to prevent the delegitimization of Israel…” —Edward I. Koch

“Gil is a solid scholar and a lucid writer. But never has he written a book like this. It is the passion, the outrage, that distinguishes Moynihan’s Moment in Gil’s corpus.” —Stephen H. Hess, Brookings Institution

“A must-read book this season…with lessons for today that have never been more timely or relevant.” —Hillel Neuer, UN Watch

Reviews

The New York Observer
National Review
Commentary
Journal of Cold War Studies (PDF)
The Louis D. Brandeis Center
Jewish Review of Books
Jewish Book World
The Canadian Jewish News
The American Jewish World
Jewish Herald Voice
Jewish News of Greater Phoenix

Interviews

LA Jewish Journal
The Jewish Press

About the Book

Moynihan’s Moment tells the previously untold story of America’s fight—by legendary statesman Daniel Patrick Moynihan—against the 1975 UN Resolution that called Zionism a form of racism. Moynihan’s Moment examines world events that led to the drafting of the resolution, recounts Moynihan’s political maneuverings to prevent its passage, and traces the effects this historic episode had on the UN, the US-Israel relationship, and world opinion. Moynihan’s Moment captures a pivotal moment on the international political stage that launched a major political career, fostered a confrontational approach to American foreign policy, emboldened the US-Israel relationship, and marked the beginning of an era in which Israel would continuously need to defend its right to exist.
About the Author

Gil Troy is a leading presidential historian, and one of today’s most prominent activists in the fight against the delegitimization of Israel. He is Professor of History at McGill University, and a Research Fellow in the Shalom Hartman Institute’s Engaging Israel Program. Professor Troy’s writings have appeared in The New York Times, The New Republic, and other major media outlets. He writes a weekly column for The Jerusalem Post, and is Editor-at-Large of The Daily Beast’s Open Zion blog. Professor Troy is the author of eight books, including biographies of Ronald Reagan and Hillary Rodham Clinton."

Apr 19, 15

"T. H. Tsien, a scholar of Chinese books and printing who in 1941 risked his life to smuggle tens of thousands of rare volumes to safety amid the Japanese occupation of Shanghai, died on April 9 at his home in Chicago. He was 105.

His death was announced by the University of Chicago, with which he had been associated since the late 1940s. At his death, he was an emeritus professor of East Asian languages and civilizations there and an emeritus curator of the university’s East Asian library.

One of the world’s most renowned scholars of Chinese bibliography and paleography — the study of ancient writing — Professor Tsien (pronounced chee-AHN) was the author of scores of books and articles, many in English, about the august history of the written word in China. As he was fond of reminding people, movable type originated in China centuries before Gutenberg.

Professor Tsien, who was born in China in the twilight of the reign of its last emperor, was a young librarian there during the Japanese occupation, which lasted from 1931 until the end of World War II. Working in secret, he was charged with keeping a trove of precious volumes, some dating to the first millennium B.C., from falling into the occupiers’ hands.

The Library of Congress in Washington agreed to take some 30,000 volumes, but the difficulty lay in getting them out of Shanghai. By 1941, the city’s harbor and customs office were under the control of the Japanese, who would have seized the books and very likely destroyed them. Had Professor Tsien’s work been uncovered, he would almost certainly have been executed.

Determined to get the books out of China at all costs, Professor Tsien could not have done so, he later wrote, had it not been for a turn of fate."

Apr 19, 15

"Tibetan mastiffs were once trendy must-have dogs for wealthy Chinese, selling for more than $200,000. But waning interest has left many breeders with unwanted dogs. By Andrew Jacobs on Publish Date April 17, 2015. Photo by Ed Jones/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images.
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BEIJING — There once was a time, during the frenzied heights of China’s Tibetan mastiff craze, when a droopy-eyed slobbering giant like Nibble might have fetched $200,000 and ended up roaming the landscaped grounds of some coal tycoon’s suburban villa.

But Tibetan mastiffs are so 2013.

Instead, earlier this year Nibble and 20 more unlucky mastiffs found themselves stuffed into metal chicken crates and packed onto a truck with 150 other dogs. If not for a band of Beijing animal rights activists who literally threw themselves in front of the truck, Nibble and the rest would have ended up at a slaughterhouse in northeast China where, at roughly $5 a head, they would have been rendered into hot pot ingredients, imitation leather and the lining for winter gloves.

China’s boom-to-bust luxury landscape is strewn with devalued commodities like black Audis, Omega watches, top-shelf sorghum liquor and high-rise apartments in third-tier cities. Some are the victims of a slowing economy, while others are casualties of an official austerity campaign that has made ostentatious consumption a red flag for anticorruption investigators."

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