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C Hayes

C Hayes's Public Library

  • The “redirection,” as some inside the White House have called the new strategy, has brought the United States closer to an open confrontation with Iran and, in parts of the region, propelled it into a widening sectarian conflict between Shiite and Sunni Muslims.
  • In Lebanon, the Administration has coöperated with Saudi Arabia’s government, which is Sunni, in clandestine operations that are intended to weaken Hezbollah, the Shiite organization that is backed by Iran.
  • A by-product of these activities has been the bolstering of Sunni extremist groups that espouse a militant vision of Islam and are hostile to America and sympathetic to Al Qaeda.

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  • More than anything, I realized I dreaded the righteous, self-satisfied feeling that comes with performing unsolicited acts of charity. I hated feeling good for doing something so infinitesimally small, for letting his suffering become a prop for my vanity.
  • But as MacFarquhar rightly notes, our “ambivalence toward do-gooders” is based on more than envy; it also arises out of a “deep uncertainty about how a person ought to live.”
  • These people are aid junkies, and though their choices seem alien and unimaginable to most of us, it’s not hard to understand how they got there.

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  • Laïcité is France’s principle of secularism in public affairs, aimed at fostering a post-religious society. It developed during the French Revolution, which sought to dismantle the Catholic Church in France along with the monarchy, and was enshrined in the 1905 law on the Separation of the Churches and the State.
  • As a critic argued in Le Figaro, laïcité is unintelligible and even shocking to many Muslims, who view it as “an injunction to abandon their religion.” Instead of enhancing social harmony, it may actually be exacerbating religious and racial tensions.
  • In a sense, secularism is itself an enforced practice. As Dominique Moïsi, a French political scientist, puts it, “Laïcité has become the first religion of the Republic.”

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  • Couple this with the fact that the vast majority of mass shooters are also men, and a pattern emerges. America’s gun problem can’t be distilled down to one single issue, of course, but it’s clear that on top of crime and fears of terrorism and insufficient mental health resources and the Second Amendment, America’s gun problem has something to do with America’s masculinity problem.
  • In this May 2015 op-ed for The Los Angeles Times, sociologist Jennifer Carlson argues that men are clinging to guns as a way to address a broad range of social insecurities.

  • Napoleon Bonaparte would note that, “an army marches on its stomach,”
  • The lessons of history however clear they may be, appear to be entirely lost on an either supremely ignorant or incredibly deceitful troupe of policymakers and news agencies across the West.
  • ISIS’ supply lines run precisely where Syrian and Iraqi air power cannot go. To the north and into NATO-member Turkey, and to the southwest into US allies Jordan and Saudi Arabia. Beyond these borders exists a logistical network that spans a region including both Eastern Europe and North Africa.

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    • Ingredients

        
         
      •   4    8-ounce pork chops 
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      •   1    teaspoon kosher salt 
      •  
      •   4    teaspoons grainy Dijon mustard 
      •  
      •   2    tablespoons crushed cumin seeds 
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      •   1    teaspoon cracked black pepper 
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      •   1    teaspoon canola oil 
      •  
       
         
      •  
         
         
        Nutritional Information
         
         
           
        •  
          Nutritional analysis per serving (4 servings)
              411 calories; 22 grams fat; 6 grams saturated fat; 0 grams trans fat; 9 grams monounsaturated fat; 3 grams polyunsaturated fat; 1 gram carbohydrates; 0 grams dietary fiber; 0 grams sugars; 47 grams protein; 156 milligrams cholesterol; 766 milligrams sodium   
        •  
            Note:    The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.   
             
         
         
         
      •  
        
      <!-- /.recipe-ingredients -->  
       

      Preparation

       
         
      1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Sprinkle the pork chops on both sides with salt, then brush each side with mustard. Rub the cumin and pepper into the mustard.
      2.  
      3. Heat the oil in a large cast-iron skillet over high heat. Add the pork chops and brown for 2 minutes on each side. Put the skillet in the oven and bake until the chops are just cooked through, about 12 minutes. Divide among 4 plates and serve.

  • They don’t actually mean it. They’ve had the means to uproot and destroy Islamic State within their hands for over a year now. They’ve simply refused to make use of it.
  • Not only has Erdoğan done almost everything he can to cripple the forces actually fighting Isis; there is considerable evidence that his government has been at least tacitly aiding Isis itself.
  • How has Erdoğan got away with this? Mainly by claiming those fighting Isis are “terrorists” themselves.

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  • DW's report claims no one knows who is arranging the shipments
  • Its seemingly inexhaustible supply of weapons, cash, and fighters can only be explained by multinational state sponsorship and safe havens provided by NATO ISIS' enemies - primarily Syria, Hezbollah, Iran, and Iraq - cannot strike.
  • What is  revealed is a foreign policy so staggeringly insidious, few are able to believe it, even with international broadcasters like DW showing ISIS' supply lines leading from NATO territory itself.

    • Ingredients

        
         
      •   3    pounds Idaho potatoes, peeled 
      •  
      •   3    cups half-and-half 
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      •   1    tablespoon soft butter 
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      •   3    tablespoons dry bread crumbs 
      •  
      •       Salt 
      •  
      •       Ground white pepper 
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      •   ½    teaspoon nutmeg, preferably freshly ground 
      •  
       
         
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        Nutritional Information
         
         
           
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          Nutritional analysis per serving (8 servings)
              272 calories; 12 grams fat; 7 grams saturated fat; 0 grams trans fat; 3 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 grams polyunsaturated fat; 35 grams carbohydrates; 3 grams dietary fiber; 5 grams sugars; 6 grams protein; 37 milligrams cholesterol; 68 milligrams sodium   
        •  
            Note:    The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.   
             
         
         
         
      •  
        
      <!-- /.recipe-ingredients -->  
       

      Preparation

       
         
      1. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Use a mandolin, food processor or knife to slice potatoes moderately thin (the thickness of two pennies is perfect). Place in a 3-quart saucepan and add 3 cups half-and-half; stir in salt, white pepper and nutmeg. The cream should barely cover the potatoes. Add a little more if needed. Bring to a simmer and cook gently for 6 to 8 minutes.
      2.  
      3. Meanwhile, butter a 2- to 2 1/2-quart baking dish. Dust dish with 21/2 tablespoons bread crumbs. Season potatoes by folding in salt (at least a teaspoon), pepper and nutmeg. Do not undersalt. Transfer potato mixture to the baking dish and dust top with remaining 1/2 tablespoon bread crumbs.
      4.  
      5. Bake for 25 minutes. Allow to cool 10 minutes before serving. The gratin can be reheated, but if that’s your plan, bake it for 20 minutes, leave it at room temperature and reheat it for 10 to 15 minutes before serving.

    • Ingredients

        
         
      •   153    grams 00 flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon) 
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      •   153    grams all-purpose flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon and 2 teaspoons) 
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      •   8    grams fine sea salt (1 teaspoon) 
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      •   2    grams active dry yeast (3/4 teaspoon) 
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      •   4    grams extra-virgin olive oil (1 teaspoon) 
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      •  
         
         
        Nutritional Information
         
         
           
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          Nutritional analysis per serving (2 servings)
              577 calories; 3 grams fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 1 gram monounsaturated fat; 0 grams polyunsaturated fat; 117 grams carbohydrates; 4 grams dietary fiber; 0 grams sugars; 16 grams protein; 799 milligrams sodium   
        •  
            Note:    The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.   
             
         
         
         
      •  
        
      <!-- /.recipe-ingredients -->  
       

      Preparation

       
         
      1. In a large mixing bowl, combine flours and salt.
      2.  
      3. In a small mixing bowl, stir together 200 grams (about 1 cup) lukewarm tap water, the yeast and the olive oil, then pour it into flour mixture. Knead with your hands until well combined, approximately 3 minutes, then let the mixture rest for 15 minutes.
      4.  
      5. Knead rested dough for 3 minutes. Cut into 2 equal pieces and shape each into a ball. Place on a heavily floured surface, cover with dampened cloth, and let rest and rise for 3 to 4 hours at room temperature or for 8 to 24 hours in the refrigerator. (If you refrigerate the dough, remove it 30 to 45 minutes before you begin to shape it for pizza.)
      6.  
      7. To make pizza, place each dough ball on a heavily floured surface and use your fingers to stretch it, then your hands to shape it into rounds or squares. Top and bake.

    • Ingredients

        
         
      •   1 ½    cups unsalted butter, plus more for greasing pan 
      •  
      •   1 ½    cups walnut halves (optional) 
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      •   9    ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped or broken into small pieces 
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      •   3    large eggs 
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      •   1    teaspoon salt 
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      •   2 ¾    cups sugar 
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      •   1    tablespoon vanilla extract 
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      •   1 ½    cups unbleached all-purpose flour 
      •  
       
         
      •  
         
         
        Nutritional Information
         
         
           
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          Nutritional analysis per serving (24 servings)
              297 calories; 17 grams fat; 10 grams saturated fat; 0 grams trans fat; 4 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 grams polyunsaturated fat; 32 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram dietary fiber; 23 grams sugars; 3 grams protein; 53 milligrams cholesterol; 13 milligrams sodium   
        •  
            Note:    The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.   
             
         
         
         
      •  
        
      <!-- /.recipe-ingredients -->  
       

      Preparation

       
         
      1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 13-by-9-inch glass baking pan. If using walnuts, spread on a baking sheet and toast in oven until fragrant and lightly browned, 8 to 10 minutes. Let cool.
      2.  
      3. Melt butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Remove from heat, add chocolate, and cover pan until chocolate is melted, about 10 minutes. In a mixing bowl, whisk the eggs, salt, sugar and vanilla just until thick, creamy and beginning to lighten in color.
      4.  
      5. Whisk the butter and chocolate until smooth, then mix into the sugar-egg mixture just until well combined. Using a spatula, fold in the flour, using as few strokes as possible, until it disappears. Fold in the walnuts, if using. Spread the batter evenly in the baking pan.
      6.  
      7. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, checking after 22 minutes to avoid over-baking. When the tip of a knife inserted in the center comes out with moist crumbs, but not liquid, remove brownies from the oven. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and leave in the pan for several hours or overnight before cutting into squares. Store in an airtight container.

    • Ingredients

        
         
      •   1    tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 
      •  
      •   1    small onion, chopped 
      •  
      •   4 to 6    garlic cloves (to taste), minced 
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      •       Salt to taste 
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      •   2    pounds tomatoes, cored and diced, or 1 28-ounce can chopped tomatoes with juice 
      •  
      •       Pinch of sugar 
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      •   2    large sprigs basil, or about 16 leaves, plus 2 tablespoons slivered basil for garnish 
      •  
      •   1    quart water 
      •  
      •       Freshly ground pepper to taste 
      •  
      •   1    Parmesan rind (optional) 
      •  
      •   ¼    cup rice or tapioca 
      •  
       

      For the garnishes

       
         
      •       Garlic croutons (thin slices of baguette, lightly toasted and rubbed with a cut garlic clove) 
      •  
      •       Grated or shaved Parmesan 
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        Nutritional Information
         
         
           
        •  
          Nutritional analysis per serving (4 servings)
              124 calories; 4 grams fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 2 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 grams polyunsaturated fat; 20 grams carbohydrates; 4 grams dietary fiber; 6 grams sugars; 3 grams protein; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 275 milligrams sodium   
        •  
            Note:    The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.   
             
         
         
         
      •  
        
      <!-- /.recipe-ingredients -->  
       

      Preparation

       
         
      1. Heat the oil over medium heat in a large, heavy soup pot or Dutch oven. Add the onion. Cook, stirring often, until tender, about five minutes. Stir in half the garlic and a generous pinch of salt. Cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds to a minute. Add the tomatoes, sugar, basil sprigs or leaves, and remaining garlic. Cook, stirring often, until the tomatoes have cooked down and smell fragrant, 15 to 20 minutes.
      2.  
      3. Add the water and salt to taste. Bring to a simmer, cover and reduce the heat to low. Simmer 15 minutes. Add the tapioca or rice, and simmer for another 15 minutes until the tapioca is tender and the soup fragrant. Remove the basil sprigs and Parmesan rind. Puree in a blender in small batches, taking care to place a towel over the top of the blender and hold it down tightly. If you used fresh unpeeled tomatoes and want a silkier soup, put through a strainer, using a spatula or the back of a ladle to push the soup through. Return to the pot, add pepper to taste and adjust salt. Serve garnished with garlic croutons and/or Parmesan, if desired, and slivered basil leaves. If serving cold, refrigerate until chilled.
      4.  
           

        Tip 

       
         
      •   Advance preparation: The soup will keep for two or three days in the refrigerator and can be frozen. 
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  • The same positive feedback loop can also run in reverse however, to create a vicious cycle, when a bad situation feeds on itself to make it even worse. A feedback loop exists that reinforces the poor results. It is also known as a “doom loop”, a “downward spiral” or a “slippery slope”.

  • In the 2016 campaign, as of October, Hillary Clinton had raised $20 million in “outside” money, on top of $77 million in direct campaign contributions—the highest in direct contributions of any candidate at the time.
  • Four of the top five sources of these funds are major banks: Citigroup Inc, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase & Co, and Morgan Stanley.
  • According to a February 2015 analysis of Clinton Foundation funding by The Washington Post, the financial services industry has accounted for the largest single share of the foundation’s corporate donors.

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Feb 05, 16

Top Talkers: The Morning Joe panel recaps Thursday night's Democratic debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

  • The talk was “too political” to be posted during an election year, and that “a lot of business managers and entrepreneurs would feel insulted” by some of Hanauer’s arguments.
  • Hanauer’s basic thesis – that economic growth is driven to a large extent by consumer demand – is familiar to everyone who’s ever taken Econ 101, or regularly watched business news.

  • As Karl Marx famously remarked, in “The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon,” “Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past.”
  • On the left, it has meant demands to downsize big banks, crack down on tax-dodging multinationals, shift to a much more progressive tax system, and get serious about curbing carbon emissions.
  • In the absence of the Soviet Union and Mao’s China, the world “socialist” doesn’t have the same connotations that it once did.

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  • You can add vital wheat gluten to any bread recipe, but it's especially effective when baking with low-protein flours like whole wheat and rye (which have trouble developing enough gluten) or in recipes with a lot of extra ingredients added in like nuts, dried fruit, or seeds.
  • add a few tablespoons
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