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alison gow

alison gow's Public Library

Mar 29, 15

This... "...media ad experiences are awful. I wonder sometimes if folks at media companies ever try clicking their own links from within social media like Twitter or Facebook, just to experience what a damn travesty of a user experience it is. Pop-ups that hide the content and that can't be scrolled in an in-app browser so you effectively can't ever close them to read the article. Hideous banner ads all over the page."

Mar 20, 15

I'd agree with this, and also add apathy into the mix - not only how do you hold people's attention, but how to do you get them to care enough to engage in the first place? For a mercifully brief moment the Upworthy headline was seen as the way forward - now I think it has to be about knowing the conversation well enough, and presenting your content in a way that has the audience's needs at the forefront of the presentation "The scarcest resource in journalism right now is attention span," Oreskes said. "We used to live in a world of journalism governed by the laws of physics. Time and space were our key constraints: space in a newspaper, time on the air."

But that has changed, he said. "The really controlling force in the world right now [is] how long you can keep your audience, your followers, consuming the journalism you're creating. They have just so many other places to go, so many things pulling on them and so many demands on their time that our goal is to create journalism that holds them."

Mar 20, 15

Clff Levy, editor of NYT Now, on the restructuring towards mobile of the wider company: "the whole company is shifting resources toward mobile at every part of the company. [Times Publisher] Arthur Sulzberger and Mark Thompson and [Times Executive Editor] Dean Baquet are really, really focused on mobile right now. Every division in the company is looking at how they can shift more resources to mobile. In the newsroom we're certainly doing that. There's been a lot of discussion about how we can free up resources, what can we do less of in order to move more people to mobile."

  • Bruni himself started responding to comments about the story posted to the Times’ Facebook page, and the conversation lasted throughout the weekend. But on Monday, he ventured away from the confines of the Times’ page and toward that of conservative media personality Laura Ingraham.

     

    The Times’ audience-development team had been monitoring the story’s social media performance and was alerted that Ingraham’s page had posted the piece. Recognizing her as an influencer, the social media team deployed Bruni to her page, where he answered the question Ingraham posed in her Facebook post about the story.

Mar 09, 15

Does what it says on the tin. I like the opportunities presented by Snapchat - I particularly like the idea of going back to that more intimate connection with an audience - it feels to me like the early days of journalism brands were using social media, and really sharing and connecting with the people in their niche (be that interest or geographic).

Mar 09, 15

The headline is ridiculous and doesn't really reflect the article, which is an excellent consideration of how internet media are adapting to audience needs, and shaping them, while making money. I also think the storied NYT page 1 meeting disappearing is of precisely zero interest to its readers, and of vast interest to the mainstream media. Which is probably symptomatic of the whole MSM problem - we're the most self-absorbed industry around. "Perhaps the single most powerful implication of an organization operating with Internet assumptions is that iteration – and its associated learning – is doable in a way that just wan’t possible with print. BuzzFeed as an organization has been figuring out what works online for over eight years now, and while “The Dress” may have been unusual in its scale, its existence was no accident.

What’s especially exciting about BuzzFeed, though, is how it uses that knowledge to make money. The company sells its ability to grok – and shape – what works on social to brands; what they don’t do is sell ads directly2 (in a narrow sense BuzzFeed almost certainly lost money spinning up servers and paying for bandwidth to deliver “The Dress”). The most obvious benefit of this strategy is that, contrary to popular opinion, and contrary to its many imitators, BuzzFeed does not do clickbait. "

Mar 09, 15

"Having increased the size of its staff (in addition to the recruitment of Wilson, Guido Fawkes also has a parliamentary sketch writer, Simon Carr, who joined in October 2013) the site - which has tabs for politics, media, environment and technology stories - generally runs around 15 stories every working day. This is up from seven or eight a couple of years ago.

Guido Fawkes claims to attract between 120,000 and 250,000 unique browsers a day. It aims to have something up by 8.30am each morning and then a new post every 45 minutes after that. The site has peaks in traffic at around 9am, 11am, 5pm and 8pm.

Alongside Twitter - the main Guido Fawkes account has 144,000 followers - the site’s main source of traffic is its newsletter emails.

Staines says that around 70 per cent of Guido Fawkes’ income now comes from advertising"

  • Having increased the size of its staff (in addition to the recruitment of Wilson, Guido Fawkes also has a parliamentary sketch writer, Simon Carr, who joined in October 2013) the site - which has tabs for politics, media, environment and technology stories - generally runs around 15 stories every working day. This is up from seven or eight a couple of years ago.

     

    Guido Fawkes claims to attract between 120,000 and 250,000 unique browsers a day. It aims to have something up by 8.30am each morning and then a new post every 45 minutes after that. The site has peaks in traffic at around 9am, 11am, 5pm and 8pm.

     

    Alongside Twitter - the main Guido Fawkes account has 144,000 followers - the site’s main source of traffic is its newsletter emails.

     

    Staines says that around 70 per cent of Guido Fawkes’ income now comes from advertising

Jan 17, 15

"While it hasn't reached the popularity of the other networks, Yik Yak is a powerful contender that people actually use. Often I see people post about the fight for anonymity with other applications such as Secret. I can tell you that I do not know a single person in my network who uses that application. People reference Yaks all the time with each other or send screenshots, I have yet to ever hear of a hot post on Secret that everyone’s talking about."

Jan 17, 15

"At other news organizations, SEO has taken a back seat as readers increasingly come to the news from social media networks; some outlets optimize completely for social sharing. Search remains an important traffic source for the Times, though, although MacCallum felt it had been neglected. To that end, she has designated 15 copy editors and Web producers as “SEO ambassadors” who understand how to use keywords for search to work with their peers."

Jan 17, 15

"BuzzFeed is easy to bash; a fast-rising rocket ship is a visible target. And they do produce some pretty silly content. But when you discuss the future of journalism, BuzzFeed always seems to show up at that intersection between crazy and smart where genius so often lies. What’s actually crazy is seeing most everyone try to copy BuzzFeed’s voice and play catchup to its trendy listicle format at one point or another—from old media, including the Times, to new media like Digiday, to opportunistic startups like Playbuzz."

  • This leads me to think and manage the product differently to the way my new colleagues in media approach it. Here, most managers are primarily concerned with managing the content, and only the content, as the content is considered to be the product. They have left little or no concern to the way it’s consumed or distributed or how it fosters engagement and co-creation.

     

    Now these worlds converge. Product managers have to become great content managers; and content managers have to become better product managers. In order to do so, we first have to be aware of the traditional disconnects  -  so that we can understand each other before joining forces.

Dec 22, 14

"When the sales people are happy to sell what the newsroom is happy to make, there you have a well-run editorial company. So measure your own newsroom’s misery by its distance from that (ideal) state"

Dec 22, 14

"In practically every industry that I look at, I see a major disruption happening. I know the world will be very different 15 to 20 years from now. The vast majority of companies who are presently the leaders in their industries will likely not even exist.  That is because industry executives either are not aware of the changes that are coming, are reluctant to invest the type of money that is be required for them to reinvent themselves, or are protecting legacy businesses. Most are focused on short-term performance."

Dec 10, 14

"The digital disruption to news delivery has also posed questions about the need for impartiality in the digital age. With the internet providing so many varied opinions and views on an issue, and social media favouring strongly held opinions, is there still room for the objective reporting method?"

Dec 09, 14

The Rolling Stone article on campus rape failed to protect the woman at the heart of the story by ignoring basic journalism, says Vox. I'm pretty sure such a piece would not have got past any of my old news editors when I was a reporter.
"None of those things mean Jackie is lying. But it makes it all the more important to ask for proof. If you are going to expose a traumatized 20-year-old to the judgment of the entire world with a story that many people don't want to believe is true, you owe it to everyone — to your readers, but especially to her — to make sure it is unimpeachable. It's not just damage control for your publication or your personal reputation. It's to protect the person who trusted you."

Dec 03, 14

"So perhaps the news industry must think past the idea that it is in the content, advertising, and distribution businesses. Perhaps we should ask whether — like Google and Facebook — news instead should be a service that helps people accomplish their goals. "

Dec 01, 14

Pew's research into online harassment is fascinating
60% of internet users said they had witnessed someone being called offensive names
53% had seen efforts to purposefully embarrass someone
25% had seen someone being physically threatened
24% witnessed someone being harassed for a sustained period of time
19% said they witnessed someone being sexually harassed
18% said they had seen someone be stalked

Nov 29, 14

"And perhaps if trust in politicians were higher, these memes wouldn’t be shared so uncritically as people would think there was something rum about them. But I suspect that the lack of suspicion about what the graphics purport to show doesn’t just arise because MPs have let us down. It’s also because of a failure to read the internet critically and a lack of education about what Parliament does and how it works. These memes certainly aren’t doing any educating, they are deceitfully spreading lies."

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