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UNC Pharmacy

UNC Pharmacy's Public Library

Feb 02, 16

UNC researchers have found a way to kill drug resistant lung cancer using 50 times less chemotherapy.

For the first time, researches have developed a way to package cancer drugs inside naturally occurring particles found in white blood cells, allowing them to freely pass through membranes that would otherwise resist the drug.

Dr. Elena Batrakova at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy’s Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery and her team discovered this method that allows for more effective cancer treatment.

Jan 15, 16

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers announced a breakthrough that could one day revolutionize cancer treatments, potentially reducing harmful side effects drastically.

"That means we can use 50 times less of the drug and still get the same results," says Elena Batrakova, an associate professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. "That matters because we may eventually be able to treat patients with smaller and more accurate doses of powerful chemotherapy drugs resulting in more effective treatment with fewer and milder side effects."

Jan 15, 16

The cancer drug paclitaxel just got more effective.

For the first time, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have packaged it in containers derived from a patient's own immune system, protecting the drug from being destroyed by the body's own defenses and bringing the entire payload to the tumour.

"That means we can use 50 times less of the drug and still get the same results," said Elena Batrakova, Ph.D., an associate professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

Jan 13, 16

"Most cancer facilities should have a financial counselor who's available to help talk about resources, and nonprofits may offer visits with financial planners at free or reduced cost," Weaver said.

However, "this can be a difficult process for patients, since it is hard to find reliable information regarding the cost of treatments before they are obtained," said Stacie Dusetzina, an assistant professor of pharmacy and public health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dec 17, 15

A key part of the Affordable Care Act intended to make prescription drugs more affordable for seniors may not provide much help for cancer patients who need expensive pills, according to a new study.

"In general, when you look at the policy, it really works for a lot of people," said Stacie Dusetzina, an assistant professor of pharmacy and global public health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "But for people with specialty drug needs, it doesn't really work at all."

Dec 17, 15

Seniors insured by Medicare may still face high out-of-pocket costs for oral cancer medicines even after the government health program scales back a coverage gap known as the donut hole, a U.S. study suggests.

Dec 10, 15

Research led by Stacie Dusetzina of UNC-Chapel Hill found that in 2010, a typical course of oral chemotherapy drugs cost Medicare patients up to $8,100 per year on average. New health reform policies have tried to soften that cost, but even by 2020, when the so called Medicare Part D “doughnut hole” (or coverage gap) closes, Medicare patients will still have to pay $5,600 out of pocket per year on average, a figure higher than what the average Medicare beneficiary’s household spends on food each year.

Dec 10, 15

A Triad woman and her nonprofit group have discovered a medical breakthrough when it comes to terminating viruses. Alumna Amy Greeson and Professor K.H. Lee interviewed.

Nov 05, 15

In December, Triangle pharmaceutical magnate Fred Eshelman committed $100 million to UNC-Chapel Hill to fund innovative life sciences projects. On Wednesday, the university announced the inaugural round of investments from that fund.

Oct 12, 15

Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill may have a breakthrough in the battle against Parkinson's disease.

UNC scientists have created immune cells that produce and deliver a healing protein to the brain while also teaching neurons to begin making the protein for themselves, UNC said in a news release Thursday.

The researchers, led by Elena Batrakova, an associate professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy's Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, genetically modified white blood cells called macrophages to produce glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, or GDNF, and deliver it to the brain, UNC said.

Oct 12, 15

As a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease, scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill have created smarter immune cells that produce and deliver a healing protein to the brain while also teaching neurons to begin making the protein for themselves.

The researchers, led by Elena Batrakova, an associate professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy's Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, genetically modified white blood cells called macrophages to produce glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, or GDNF, and deliver it to the brain. Glial cells provide support and protection for nerve cells throughout the brain and body, and GDNF can heal and stimulate the growth of damaged neurons.

Oct 08, 15

Scientists say a female's vaginal mucus carrying a specific type of bacteria could be the women’s first line of defence against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

“Mucosal surfaces, such as the lung, gastrointestinal tract, or female reproductive tract, are where most infections take place. Our bodies secrete over six liters of mucus every day as a first line of defense,” said Sam Lai, senior author of the study and Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Engineering at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Oct 05, 15

How much does it cost to treat breast cancer? No one seems to know.

Uninsured cancer patients pay up to twice as much for doctors’ visits and 43 times as much for chemotherapy drugs compared with what Medicare and private insurance pays, a study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill showed.

“This is unreasonable,” said Stacie Dusetzina, an assistant professor in the Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Gillings School of Global Public Health. “There needs to be more transparency and less variability in health care pricing.”

Oct 05, 15

Millions of patients get diagnosed and suffer through the long and painful treatment against breast cancer, but until today, no one seems to really know how much it cost to treat the disease.

“This is unreasonable. There needs to be more transparency and less variability in health care pricing.” stated assistant professor Stacie Dusetzina from the Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Gillings School of Global Public Health.

Oct 01, 15

Guest: Dr. Alexander "Sasha" Kabanov, Mescal Swaim Ferguson Distinguished Professor, Director, Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy; Co-Director, Carolina Ins...

Sep 21, 15

The emails pour into Elena Batrakova’s computer daily.

Batrakova, a researcher at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Eshelman School of Pharmacy's Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Development, didn’t have a personal stake in Parkinson’s disease, a degenerative neurological disorder. There’s no father, brother, child suffering from the ailment, which can impact everything from motor skills to mental clarity. There's no childhood friend-turned-patient to inspire the mission.

Sep 17, 15

UNC-Chapel Hill announced Wednesday that it has joined an international network mapping targets for cancer drugs.

The 11-year-old global partnership is called the Structural Genomics Consortium. The UNC hub will be the first in the United States. It was created with start-up funding from the UNC Eshelman Institute for Innovation at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

Sep 15, 15

In 2010, the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) declared the “syringe pull-back” method unsafe for preparing IV medications (ISMP Medication Safety Alert Acute Care 2010;15:13; http://goo.gl/​aM0SjO).

The University of North Carolina (UNC) Medical Center, where Lindsey Amerine, PharmD, MS, is the assistant director of pharmacy and an assistant professor of clinical education at UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, in Chapel Hill, is one institution that has recently chosen to remove the subjective element from their IV drug preparation process and switch to a commercial IV workflow system that weighs the drug to verify the accuracy of a dose.

Aug 13, 15

UNC-Chapel Hill officials celebrated their record fundraising year Wednesday with a party and a promise to gear up an expected seven-year campaign.

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