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Paul Gillin

Paul Gillin's Public Library

  • If advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) achieve anticipated adoption rates, up to 90% of vehicle collisions could be avoided, saving up to $190 billion each year in the U.S. alone, according to a new study.
  • On average, 1.2 billion people spend 50 minutes driving in the car per day. Commuters around the world waste time in traffic jams, with the average commuter in large urban areas in the U.S. spending 52 hours per year stuck in traffic.
  • Parking space would also see an increase with self-driving cars, as up to 15% of the parking width could be saved in ADAS dedicated parking, the study said. People would simply exit a car, and it would go park itself without needing the additional space for driver and passengers to get out.

  • they will dramatically reduce accidents. Consensus of the manufacturers are that safety is a huge buying motivator today."

     
      

    Dulaney said he expects we will indeed see at least some commercial self-driving cars by the end of the current decade and potential mass adoption beginning in the 2020s.

  • Still, challenges remain, starting with governmental regulations. So far, only a handful of states have addressed autonomous vehicles in legislation. According to Stanford, state bills allowing autonomous vehicles have passed in four states: California, Nevada, Michigan, and Florida. Bills have failed in nine states and bills are under consideration in 15 states and Washington DC.
  • As driverless cars begin to share the road with traditional automobiles, additional rules and regulations may be needed to determine how the vehicles will be allowed to interact or if certain roads will be designated for a specific type of vehicle.

1 more annotation...

Jun 21, 15

"Mr. Eustice said vehicles still can’t be relied on to perform correctly in dynamic driving situations or in bad weather, off major routes or where maps may be out of date.

The McKinsey study predicts that insurance companies will shift their focus to technical failures and away from driver risk profiles over time.

It also suggests a massive shift in the automotive business model, resulting from pay-for-use rather than ownership of vehicles, and it also forecasts that autonomous vehicles will advance robotics development because of common components."

  • Mr. Eustice said vehicles still can’t be relied on to perform correctly in dynamic driving situations or in bad weather, off major routes or where maps may be out of date.

    The McKinsey study predicts that insurance companies will shift their focus to technical failures and away from driver risk profiles over time.

    It also suggests a massive shift in the automotive business model, resulting from pay-for-use rather than ownership of vehicles, and it also forecasts that autonomous vehicles will advance robotics development because of common components.

Jun 21, 15

"In fact, autonomous vehicles could reduce traffic accidents by 90%, according to a new report from McKinsey. In the process, our new robot cars will save us $190 billion in wrecked cars, broken bones, and other costs incurred by plowing into things with our current fleet of brain-driven cars."

  • In fact, autonomous vehicles could reduce traffic accidents by 90%, according to a new report from McKinsey. In the process, our new robot cars will save us $190 billion in wrecked cars, broken bones, and other costs incurred by plowing into things with our current fleet of brain-driven cars.
  • According to McKinsey's report, mass adoption of self-driving cars will begin 15 years from now. By 2040, 75% of cars could be self-driving, according to IEEE.
  • In 2000, for instance, many auto executives and research firms predicted hydrogen fuel-cell powered vehicles would be a prevalent form of transportation by 2020, but some car companies have backed away from that technology. More recently, electric vehicles have been held up as the future, but low gas prices and the high price of technology have slowed their adoption.
Jun 21, 15

"Dr. Anuj K. Pradhan, an assistant research scientist at the University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute,"

  • “The human factor is one of the biggest hurdles towards having an automated vehicle on the road,” Dr. Pradhan said, adding that it is “one of maybe three or four.” If he had to rank them all, he’d put human factor at number one, liability issues at number two, cybersecurity and privacy issues as number three, and ethical issues at number four—all of which, he noted, he ranks far ahead of technological issues. On that front, he said, we’ve “pretty much figured out what needs to be done.”

  • The truth is quite the opposite  — and a hard truth it is — for those invested deeply in the status quo. For one, it will mean an end to personal car ownership, except in rare circumstances. From the user’s end of things, this means you will just summon a car with your phone, and it will take you where you’re going. Since you won’t own the car, you won’t care what it looks like or what’s under the hood, which means that cars will become a lot more uniform in design, as well as cheaper, safer and far cleaner and more efficient. There will be no more corner gas stations and no more main street mechanics’ shops or oil change outfits, since everything will be managed, as it were, at a bulk rather than an individual level of service delivery.

  • Today’s average high-end car has roughly seven times more code than a Boeing 787.8
  • Technology and connectivity pose the question of whether it’s necessary to own an automobile. Car sharing is a prominent example: the consumer pays to use vehicles only as needed and foregoes the responsibilities—and benefits—of individual ownership. Car-sharing services, which allow people to make a reservation at the tap of a personal mobile device, are expected to grow significantly in the next two years, with dramatic increases in the number of users and in revenues.12 These developments also defy the very notion of a car as a personal, autonomous machine. Already, “millennials” (the 18–34 demographic) appear to place less importance on car ownership than previous generations do. They are more open to sharing cars and to the rapidly growing number of “mobility services,” such as Uber and Lyft.

     

  • We would expect a broad car-ownership regime to include a variety of vehicle types, at both ends of the spectrum: not only more utilitarian, almost “vandal-proof” fleet cars for shared rides but also higher-performance “fun” cars for those who still enjoy being behind the wheel for a Sunday drive.

4 more annotations...

  • According to a new report from Navigant Research, sales of autonomous vehicles will grow from fewer than 8,000 annually in 2020 to 95.4 million in 2035, representing 75 percent of all light-duty vehicle sales by that time.
  • before full autonomous driving capability becomes available, liability issues must be clarified.  Automakers will be reluctant to assume responsibility for not only supplying the vehicles, but also safely operating them.

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