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Nate Kogan

Nate Kogan's Public Library

Apr 12, 16

"Time
The tournament director may declare that a team has forfeited a match should it fail to appear on time, or if the team is otherwise unable or unwilling to compete in accordance with the tournament’s rules.
A game consists of two timed halves. If the score is tied at the end of the game, an overtime period will be played.
Intercollegiate matches, including community college matches, will use 10-minute halves.
All other matches will use 9-minute halves.
If all of the tossup questions provided for a game have been read, the game is over (even if time remains on the clock). However, if one or more tossups had to be replaced during the match and the potential score change due to the shortfall could change the outcome of the game, then the moderator will acquire supplemental tossups equal to the number that were replaced and continue the game until time expires or the supplemental tossups are exhausted. For example, if the game packet includes 24 tossups but only 23 are officially read (because moderator error required that 1 be replaced), then the moderator shall acquire 1 supplemental tossup if there is time on the clock and the trailing team is within 50 points.
If all of the bonus questions provided for a game have been read, but a team earns a bonus, the moderator shall acquire a supplemental bonus.
The clock starts when the moderator begins reading the first tossup question.
When the clock sounds the end of time, the half or game shall end with the conclusion of the current tossup-bonus cycle. In particular:
If the moderator has just finished a bonus question or an unanswered tossup question and has not yet begun the next tossup, then the half or game is over. A tossup is considered to have been begun when the first syllable of the actual question is read. Preliminary statements (e.g., “Here’s the next tossup” or “Tossup 23”) do not count as having started the tossup.
If the moderator is reading a tossup question, then he or she shall continue reading it, giving both teams a chance to answer, and their full time allotment to signal. If the tossup is answered correctly, that team will earn a bonus question. If the tossup goes unanswered, then the half or game is over.
If the moderator is reading a bonus question, then the half or game shall end when that bonus has been completed.
A team will be read its entire bonus question, even if time expires during the bonus or before the bonus is begun.
The team with more points at the end of the game wins. If the score is tied:
An off-the-clock overtime period consisting of three tossup questions will follow. These tossup questions are scored normally (including power points and interrupt penalties). Bonus questions are not used in overtime. These tossups will be read from the original set (if unread tossups remain) or may be obtained from the tournament director.
If the score is still tied after three tossups, the moderator will read tossup questions until the score changes. These tossups will be read from the original set (if unread tossups remain) or may be obtained from the tournament director. The game ends immediately if a team receives an interrupt penalty.
The clock shall not stop, except:
At the end of the half.
When a timeout is called.
When a game official needs to adjudicate a procedural protest or other serious problem; to discipline, warn, or eject a player; to replace a question; or to acquire replacement or supplemental questions when necessary.
If the moderator needs more than 2 seconds to consult with other game officials or to determine the content or acceptability of a response.
Each team has one 30-second timeout per game. Timeouts do not carry over from game to game, nor are teams given additional timeouts in overtime periods.
Only an active player or official coach may call a timeout. A timeout is called by saying “timeout” or “time.”
A timeout may be called only before the beginning of a tossup question. Once a tossup-bonus cycle has begun, a team cannot call a timeout for the duration of that cycle.
Game officials will ignore any attempt to call a timeout at any other time, unless they consider such an attempt unsporting behavior.
Game officials will also ignore any attempt to call a timeout by a team that has already called one. Repeated or disruptive attempts to call additional timeouts may be considered game-delaying tactics and result in a player’s warning or ejection.
The timepiece used by the game officials is the official time and is not protestable.
The timeliness with which the clock is started at the beginning of a half or with which it is started and/or stopped at other points in the game is not protestable unless a discrepancy exceeding 5 seconds is alleged.
Tossups
A player may signal to answer a tossup question at any point after the moderator has begun reading the question. Only one player per team may signal to answer each tossup question. A player who signals before the question has been read in its entirety is said to have interrupted the tossup.
When a player has signaled, a game official will acknowledge (“recognize”) the player by name, by number, by pointing toward the player, or merely by looking at the player. There is no penalty if a player who has signaled answers before being acknowledged.
If a player signals before the moderator has finished reading the question, the moderator will stop at that point. If the response given is incorrect, the moderator will finish the question for the other team only (if the other team is still eligible to answer the question). The moderator should not reread the entire question, but should resume as close as possible to the point at which the signal occurred.
An answer to a tossup must begin within 2 seconds after the player has been recognized. An answer begun after the moderator has said “Time” will be treated as no answer. Ties between the player and the moderator calling time are decided in favor of the player.
Players have 3 seconds to signal after the moderator has finished reading the tossup. If the player answers incorrectly, the other team (if it is eligible to answer), will then have 3 more seconds to signal. Some questions may permit more time, which will be noted specifically by the question.
Computation tossups (marked by text that begins “Pencil and paper ready”) have slightly different timing rules:
Teams have 10 seconds (not 3) to ring in after the moderator finishes the question. If the first team signals before the end of the question, the second team will have the full 10 seconds to signal after the reading of the question is completed.
If the first team signals after the end of the question, the moderator will allow whatever time remained of the initial 10 seconds (or 3 seconds, whichever is greater) for the second team to signal.
Despite this additional time, players still have only 2 seconds to give their answer after signaling on a computation tossup.
If a computation tossup specifies a different time limit than 10 seconds, that time limit shall be used instead.
Decisions as to whether players have exceeded the allotted time to signal or to answer are made by the moderator and are not protestable.
Each tossup question is worth 10 points. In addition, tossups have power marks (denoted by an asterisk). A player earns 15 points for a correct answer to a tossup if the player signals before the moderator has completed the first syllable after the mark. The moment of judgment is when the player signals, not when the moderator stops reading, so it is critical that moderators stop instantly once they hear a signal. Ties between the player and the moderator are decided in favor of the player. The determination of whether a tie occurred is not protestable, and the effect on the game of a moderator failing to stop reading immediately is not protestable.
There is a 5-point interrupt penalty (“neg five” or “minus five”) if the first team interrupts a tossup with an incorrect response. A subsequent incorrect interrupt by the second team does not result in another penalty. The second team may still earn 15 points with a sufficiently early signal. Players may earn 15 points on power tossups at any point in the game, including overtime.
If a player who has not signaled gives a response:
If no other player has signaled, the response shall be treated as illegal conferring (see Rule G.12) by the player who gave it.
If the player who responds is not on the same team as a player who did signal, the moderator will ignore the response (even if it is correct), and will recognize the player on the other team who actually signaled. Only that player will have a chance to respond, as the non-signaler has disqualified his team on that tossup question by illegal conferral (see Rule G.12).
If the player who responds is a teammate of the player who did signal, and the responses are given simultaneously, the moderator will ignore the player who did not signal and evaluate the response from the player who did. No illegal conferring is called in this case, and the determination of simultaneity is not protestable.
If a teammate of the player who signaled gives a response before the player who signaled gives a response, the moderator will treat that response as illegal conferring (see Rule G.12) by the player who had not signaled.
If a teammate of the player who signaled gives a response after the player who signaled gives a response, the moderator will ignore the player who didn’t signal and evaluate the response from the player who did. No illegal conferring is called in this case.
If a player answers because an official incorrectly identified who signaled first, the tossup must be replaced. The determination of whether a moderator correctly or incorrectly identified a player is not protestable.
If the moderator inadvertently reveals the answer to a tossup question after one team has given an incorrect answer, but before the other team has had a chance to answer, the moderator will read a replacement tossup for the second team only, off the clock. If neither team has had a chance to answer, the tossup question is thrown out and replaced off the clock. The clock is turned back on for a bonus.
Players may engage in non-verbal, non-written conferral with teammates (not alternates, coaches, or spectators) on tossup questions, provided that the conferring does not convey any information about the substance of the answer. In other words, players may hold their signaling devices forward, gesticulate, or otherwise indicate that they know the answer, but cannot indicate in any manner what they believe the answer to be, nor can they communicate with teammates verbally or in writing. Illegal conferring on a tossup question (including cases of players responding without having signaled) will be treated as an incorrect response (including the assessment of an interrupt penalty if it occurred prior to the end of the tossup question and the other team had not already responded).
Like interrupt penalties for incorrect answers, interrupt penalties assessed for illegal conferring also preclude subsequent interrupt penalties (assessed against the other team). The rule that no more than one 5-point penalty be assessed per tossup question is absolute.
If players on both teams simultaneously confer illegally, the moderator shall not award an interrupt penalty, but shall instead simply treat the tossup question as unanswered. This determination of simultaneity is not protestable.
A moderator may disregard a signal that he or she deems to be inadvertent (e.g., a signal when all that has been said is “This man” or a signal resulting from a dropped signaling device). The determination of whether a signal is inadvertent is not protestable.
Bonuses
Bonus questions are never skipped. For example, if neither team answers tossup question #1, but a team correctly answers tossup question #2, it will then hear bonus question #1 (as it is the first unread bonus question). The effect on the game of inadvertently skipping a bonus is not protestable. A moderator may return to an inadvertently skipped bonus in the future.
Teams may confer on bonus questions. It is recommended that the captain give the answer for the team or clearly indicate who will give the answer. The moderator, however, will take the first answer unambiguously directed at him or her. If conflicting answers are directed at the moderator, the captain will be asked to choose the team’s answer. The determination of whether an answer was directed at the moderator is not protestable.
A team has 5 seconds to answer each part of a bonus question, unless otherwise noted by the question. After reading each part, the moderator will prompt the team for an answer after 4 seconds. Once prompted, someone on that team must begin answering, or the captain must immediately designate the person who will answer.
A team may begin its answer before the end of a bonus question. In such cases, the moderator stops reading when the team begins its answer. If the bonus contains another part, the moderator then asks the next part. This happens even if the part asks for more than one piece of information and the team gives only one; a risk of answering the bonus while it is being read is that a team might miss the fact that it is asking for multiple pieces of information.
If the bonus question contains multiple parts, a team may answer only the part that is being read. For this purpose, any “introduction” (e.g., “For 10 points each—given a vice president of the United States, name the president under whom he served.”) is considered to belong to the first part of the question.
A team may decline the chance to answer an entire bonus question or the remaining parts of a bonus question if the captain says, “We pass the rest of the bonus,” “No answer for the entire bonus,” or makes a similar declaration that explicitly refers to multiple parts. In such a case, the moderator should stop reading immediately, award any points earned on parts that were heard, and begin the next tossup question. In this case the moderator should not read the correct answers to the skipped parts.
If a bonus question calls for multiple answers, the response must be given as a continuous list. Any pause of 1 second ends the response. The moderator will not prompt a team to complete a partial response.
If a moderator inadvertently reveals the answer to a part of a bonus before the team has answered, the entire next bonus will be read as a replacement. However, the team may not earn more or fewer points on the replacement bonus than would have been possible with the completion of the original bonus. For example: a team earns 10 points on the first two parts of a three-part bonus before the moderator botches the third part; the team will get a replacement bonus, but will receive at least 10 points (even if it actually scores 0 points on the replacement bonus) and no more than 20 points (even if it answers every part of the replacement bonus correctly). Such replacement bonuses are read off the clock.
If a team receives an anomalous bonus valued at fewer than 30 points, it may request a replacement. If it chooses to keep the lesser valued bonus at the time of play, it will stand. A request for a replacement must be made as soon as it becomes apparent that the bonus is not worth 30 points. The replacement bonus does not have minimum or maximum scores, regardless of the team’s performance on the original, anomalous bonus.
If a team receives an anomalous bonus valued at more than 30 points, it must be replaced as soon as it becomes apparent that the bonus is not worth 30 points. The replacement bonus does not have minimum or maximum scores, regardless of the team’s performance on the original, anomalous bonus.
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Sep 13, 15

Code for JavaScript embedded word count; useful for class blogs.

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