Skip to main content

Kathi Berens

Kathi Berens's Public Library

  • If you've ever moved classroom chairs into a circle rather than rows, you know that the physical design of the classroom shapes student discussion. In computational terms: you ask students to move their chairs (classroom hardware) into a circle (software) so their attention spreads from the podium to other students (an action) that leads students to talk directly with each other (an output). In this sense and many others, the classroom is an interface: a point of contact where meaningful actions happen between students, teachers, ideas and technologies, and between our virtual and physical selves.

  • At the end of the day, however, the success of the vast Endgame world will depend on the success of the novel. As much as Frey and Google believe every piece of Endgame will be a vital part of the story, the books (and eventual movies) are the pieces that have a chance of lasting beyond the present. Readers will pick up the book years from now, long after the ARG and app have faded, long after the fictional social media profiles for the book’s characters have gone dormant. It’s almost impossible for the rest of the universe to be as essential as the books — Endgame might have the most involved and deeply layered supplementary content of any piece of media in recent memory, but at its core it’s still just that: supplemental.

  • technical beings and living beings are involved in continuous reciprocal causation in which both groups change together in related and indeed synergistic ways.
  • This dynamic has implications for the “folding of time,” a phenomenon Bruno Latour (1994) identifies as crucial to understanding technological change.
  • The “stitching” (actually an impressed pattern) on my Honda Accord vinyl dashboard covering, for example, recalls the older leather coverings that were indeed stitched. So pervasive are skeuomorphs that once one starts looking from them, they appear to be everywhere

56 more annotations...

  • new behaviors
  • The ad business has always been about creating messages that get people to do something with the product.
  • Part of it could be attributed to the nature of the media in which those ads appeared

2 more annotations...

  • The smartest solution, or at least framework, that I’ve read comes from Benjamin Wittes, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. According to an essay that he published last year, titled “Databuse,” we should let certain things that we now consider privacy abuses slide.
  • It’s disconcerting, but not harmful.

  • What they never answered or asked is why and how. Had they asked why, they would’ve realized that in a world where you could, for a couple of dollars, assume the likeness of anyone from Elvis and Harry Potter to the sitting U.S. president, there wasn’t much need for a virtual American Apparel outfit in a range of colors. Had they asked how, they would’ve understood that Second Life was not a screen someone watched; it was a screen where someone created. For brands, to become an integral part of Second Life meant helping players to become someone they couldn’t be in their real lives, to help them create. Instead, they erected monuments to the advertising tradition.
  • Bookmarking anything other than a page in a book is a new behavior.
  • new behaviors

8 more annotations...

  • Watson is not the only one being told to "get back" by misogynists who wield sexual terror as a weapon.
  • public life and suffered the consequences
  • deeply-held idea that women have a responsibility to alter their behavior in order to avoid sexual violence.

5 more annotations...

  • It’s also likely to lead to greater standardization.
  • Creating standard materials, he argues, makes it easier to create measures for evaluating
  • Without measurement we can’t educate,

10 more annotations...

  • As these online course products have improved, more and more schools have plugged them into their curricula. The result is a creeping homogenization of basic classes throughout many U.S. universities. That’s raising some uncomfortable questions, starting with: Why should I pick one school over another if they offer the exact same classes? And: Why are universities buying ready-made frozen meals instead of cooking up their own educational fare?
  • The growing uniformity, though it has its advantages, puts schools in an awkward position.
  • Pearson PLC could become Pearson U. But the publishers don’t have college accreditation. They need the colleges to turn a course into something that can count toward a degree, and they don’t want to undercut their main market.

3 more annotations...

  • This is a crucial moment in MLA’s long history. My career and those of many of my friends are testament that it’s not too late to find support for your research even if you didn’t walk that path from the beginning. MLA’s invitation to stand acknowledges that scholars may draw from a diverse set of priorities when establishing their own paths, and that in 2014 our profession might be the richer for it.

  • Hayles adopts the concept of human-machine intermediation — used  here to account for emergent forms of cognition — as a literal and metaphorical  description of the "dynamics of human-computer  interaction"  [Hayles 2008, 51].  "Intermediation" means the emergence of complex patterns from local  interactions resulting from "recursive feedback and  feedforward loops"  [Hayles 2008, 48] in a dynamic heterarchy.
  • Landow, Bolter and others certainly overstressed the liberatory effects of hyperlinks as reader-oriented structures and mis-represented codex dynamics.

  • The oldest conceptions of time are tied to the natural world, of course, days and nights, for example, and so in a sense they are fused with our bodies, our evolution, as we show whenever we cross enough time zones to get jet lagged -- which is one of the interesting ways technology comes in: the way it can expose aspects of time that are invisible to us because they are so much part of our lives they are as natural as breathing.
May 01, 14

Use this for LAF ebr piece. Netprov fulfills condition 2.

What she says about murmur is not precisely true either, since some of the anecdotes are personal stories of use of that space.

Here is the Raley fn to which Ryan is objecting:
Building on Espen Aarseth's typological analysis of user perspective, Marie-Laure Ryan articulates a difference between internal and external interactivity with respect to digitally produced fictional 
worlds. In the former, the user experiences the fictional world from a first-person perspective, traditionally through processes of identification, while in the latter, the user adopts a perspective external 
to the fictional world and experiences it not as a character but as an observer ("Beyond Myth and Metaphor").  Note that this is fn 3 in the Genre article "On Locative Narrative) Genre 2008 Volume 41, Number 3-4: 123-147 p. 125.

  • Raley takes my argument out of context by claiming that I am speaking about electronic literature in general. But there is a difference between "literature" (i.e. language-based, artistic text) and "narrative" which needs to be neither artistic nor language-based. In my view, it is very possible for users to take an active role in electronic literature, for instance in projects that ask them to produce text, but I still have yet to see an example of a digital work where: (1) the user's performance results in a coherent narrative, (2) the narrative is about the user (or rather about the character impersonated by the user), and (3) this narrative is dynamically produced rather than pre-scripted. Some video games fulfill conditions 1 and 2 but not condition 3 - the player progresses along a pre-determined storyline - or they fulfill conditions 1 and 3 but not condition 2 - as, to some extent, in The Sims. The only examples of works that fulfill all three of these conditions are table-top role-playing games, which rely on improvisation by naturally intelligent humans (see Caïra 2007), but these games use old-fashioned pen and paper, not digital technology. Judging by the description on its website, the Berlin subway event that Raley discusses cannot be described as a story, much less as a story in which the user plays the role of a character. As for other cases of "locative narratives," for instance murmur or 34 North 118 West by Jeff Knowlton, Naomi Spellman and Jeremy Hight, they may consist of stories, and the user plays an active role in searching for them in real space (what I call in Avatars "exploratory participation"), but the stories concern other people. So it is pointless to apply my remarks to locative narratives, since they do not fulfill condition 2.

     

  • In my view, it is very possible for users to take an active role in electronic literature, for instance in projects that ask them to produce text, but I still have yet to see an example of a digital work where: (1) the user’s performance results in a coherent narrative, (2) the narrative is about the user (or rather about the character impersonated by the user), and (3) this narrative is dynamically produced rather than pre-scripted. Some video games fulfill conditions 1 and 2 but not condition 3 - the player progresses along a pre-determined storyline - or they fulfill conditions 1 and 3 but not condition 2 - as, to some extent, in The Sims. The only examples of works that fulfill all three of these conditions are table-top role-playing games, which rely on improvisation by naturally intelligent humans (see Caïra 2007), but these games use old-fashioned pen and paper, not digital technology.

  • Ryan categorises interactivity and immersion as dichotomous experiences, moving between immersion and deimmersion through interactivity. In doubly deictic subjectivity such as this, however, the interactive performance involves a split displacement whereby the reader is both self-consciously aware of his/her own physical interaction and immersed through re-embodiment. This is precisely because the interactive performance has such direct links with the narrative action.
  • In its evolution from text-only format through to the digital animation featured in TOC the new media novel, there is a clear increase in multimodality. Indeed, as Tomasula himself says, “this was sort of the genesis of TOC as a multimedia piece”
  • enhanced neurological response

5 more annotations...

  • One crucial aspect of this debate is whether games can be said to be “texts,” and thereby subject to a textual-hermeneutic approach. Here we find the political question of genre at play: the fight over the games’ generic categorization is a fight for academic influence over what is perhaps the dominant contemporary form of cultural expression
  • The story perspective has many benefits: it is safe, trendy, and flexible.
  • controlled (despite what those deconstructionists may have claimed). Storytelling is a valuable skill, the main mode of successful communication. And theories of storytelling are (seemingly) universal: they can be applied to and explain any medium, phenomenon, or culture. So why should not games also be a type of story?

8 more annotations...

  • Student engagement is a buzzword often used by vendors to mean command and control. 
  • Being surveiled is different from being validated.
  • part of the reason that faculty have been slow to advocate for their students when it comes to their informal learning practices and online knowledge networks is that faculty have been much less coerced than students by administrative efforts to police their computer use.

  • WEEK 4 — CONCRETE POETRY History & Today
    Concrete Poetry (Wikipedia entry)
    Adam Lisckiewicz, Alphabet Man
    Dan Waber, “Strings
    GOOGLE HANGOUT TUES. APRIL 22, 8:30-9:30PM

  • Great Salt Lake, a saltwater lake in northwestern Utah, is the largest lake in the western United States.
  • the lake covers about 1,600 square miles
  • The concentration of salt varies, depending on the amount of water in the lake at any given time.
1 - 20 of 1269 Next › Last »
20 items/page

Diigo is about better ways to research, share and collaborate on information. Learn more »

Join Diigo