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  • The only check on the use of deprivation powers has been the stipulation that the government cannot deprive the individual of citizenship if to do so would make them stateless (i.e. only dual nationals could have their citizenship revoked).
  • he revamped 2013 Bill draws on language from previous legislation to give the Home Secretary the power to make an individual stateless if their conduct is thought to be ‘seriously prejudicial to the vital interests of the United Kingdom’.
  • in unchecked citizenship deprivation: rather than the governed choosing their government, governments choose who they wish to govern.

  • I also do care that we can’t even conceive of a conversation to start talking about what the continued existence of the laws represent without the need to duck and dive accusations of western norms, morals and values.

  • The first phase of this attitude reached over from about 1700 to 1820: and as the result, almost Egyptian darkness fell upon the mind of the race, throughout the whole land. Following came a more infamous policy. It was the denial of intellectuality in the Negro; the assertion that he was not a human being, that he did not belong to the human race. This covered the period from 1820 to 1835, when Gliddon and Nott and others, published their so called physiological work, to prove that the Negro was of a different species from the white man. A distinguished illustration of this ignoble sentiment can be given. In the year 1833 or 4 the speaker was an errand boy in the Anti slavery office in New York City. On a certain occasion he heard a conversation between the Secretary and two eminent lawyers from Boston, Samuel E. Sewell and David Lee Child. They had been to Washington on some legal business. While at the Capitol they happened to dine in the company of the great John C. Calhoun, then senator from South Carolina. It was a period of great ferment upon the question of Slavery, States' Rights, and Nullification; and consequently the Negro was the topic of conversation at the table. One of the utterances of Mr. Calhoun was to this effect "That if he could find a Negro who knew the Greek syntax, he would then believe that the Negro was a human being and should be treated as a man." Just think of the crude asininity of even a great man! Mr. Calhoun went to "Yale" to study the Greek Syntax, and graduated there. His son went to Yale to study the Greek syntax, and graduated there. His grandson, in recent years, went to Yale, to learn the Greek Syntax, and graduated there. School and Colleges were necessary for the Calhouns, and all other white men to learn the Greek syntax. And yet this great man knew that there was not a school, nor a college in which a black boy could learn his A, B, C's. He knew that the law in all the Southern States forbade Negro instruction under the severest penalties. How then was the Negro to learn the Greek Syntax? How then was he to evidence to Mr. Calhoun his human nature? Why, it is manifest that Mr. Calhoun expected the Greek syntax to grow in Negro brains, by spontaneous generation! Mr. Calhoun was then, as much as any other American, an exponent of the nation's mind upon his point.
11 Mar 14

A group of activists gathered outside of the Nigerian embassy on Friday to protest anti-gay laws in the African country and to condemn the leadership of President Goodluck Jonathan.<br /><br />Babakekere, a gay Nigerian man attending the protest, fled to the U.S. in December of 2012 from Africa. Fearing for his safety, Babakekere uses a pseudonym to protect his identity.

11 Mar 14

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo:<br /><br />As Uganda comes to terms with the controversial Anti-Homosexuality Bill recently signed into law, there are some pushing the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to follow in its footsteps.<br /><br />Last December, Steve Mbikayi, an MP with the Parti Travailliste Congolais (PTC), introduced a draft bill to the Congolese National Assembly that would explicitly criminalise homosexuality. The DRC is one of the relatively few African countries in which homosexual acts have not been directly banned though there is much discrimination against LGBT communities

11 Mar 14

Civil rights activists in Uganda put forward a petition to the country’s Constitutional Court on Tuesday, to challenge the validity of anti-homosexuality laws introduced last month.

11 Mar 14

“I am in full solidarity with the LGBT community and I will continue to defend their rights in Uganda and across Africa. Rest assured of my unwavering support and action for the realization of the rights for every human being, which has been my struggle since childhood. I will not reverse my path.<br /><br />I will continue to engage with the Government of Uganda and civil society organizations on this important matter” – Speciosa Kazibwe<br /><br />Former Vice President Speciosa Wandira-Kazibwe has issued a firm statement taking against President Yoweri Museveni’s recent signing of the controversial Anti-Homosexuality law.<br /><br />The new law is said to be popular locally but is regarded by many foreign states as an act of violation of human rights.

02 Mar 14

President Yoweri Museveni has done it. Against widespread expectation raised by his earlier pledge, the Ugandan leader turned around this week and signed into law the contentious Anti-Homosexuality Bill passed last December by a parliament his ruling party, the National Resistance Movement (NRM), controls. The bill had been opposed locally and internationally for a record four years, since its introduction to the legislature in 2009.<br /><br />It is a remarkable coincidence that Museveni’s executive action came in the week Pambazuka News has devoted to a special issue on the lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender and intersex (LBGTI) struggles in Africa. Our decision to dedicate a special issue to this subject was informed by the alarming reality that throughout Africa, colonial era laws that criminalised ‘unnatural acts’ are now being reinforced by independent governments, pushed by powerful lobbies, under the pretext that homosexuality is ‘un-African’ and harmful: this despite the fact that the existence of LGBTI persons in Africa since time immemorial is well documented. Colonial legislators would have had no reason to criminalise homosexuality if it is the Europeans who introduced it to the continent.<br /><br />Beyond repression through harsh laws, there is fierce LGBTI intolerance throughout Africa. Even in countries where the constitution proclaims non-discrimination on whatever grounds, politicians, the priestly class and other self-styled moral police are undeterred in inciting their followers against gays. Homosexual persons have been attacked and killed or injured. Many have been forced into hiding, ostracised by their families, denied employment, have been unable to rent a house, etc. In South Africa the horrific phenomenon of ‘corrective rape’ before killing has been perpetrated by men against lesbians as an alleged ‘cure’ of their sexual orientation. It is impossible to remain silent in the face of this epidemic of hate and violence against innocent people.

02 Mar 14

The controversial law criminalizing homosexuality and all its attendant acts which was recently signed in Nigeria has been generating controversy worldwide.<br /><br />Many Nigerians believe the law is in order, while a few disagree, however, the bulk of the international community is of the opinion that the law is unduly harsh and discriminatory.<br /><br />Nigerian gay rights activist, Bisi Alimi, who had to leave the country in 2007 out of fear for his life, spoke to CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on his feelings about the law and the fate of the Nigerian LGBT community.<br /><br />Watch video below:

01 Mar 14

If Kenya is not Uganda or Nigeria, why are we at the brink of legislating laws that further criminalise same sex sexualities?<br /><br />Kenya will soon follow Uganda and Nigeria in enacting new anti-gay laws, my crystal ball predicts. And it might be sooner than you expect.<br /><br />According to several media reports on radio and TV, several lobby groups, politicians and religious associations, have come out publicly to call for stricter – read, extreme – laws against homosexuality in the country. Unfortunately, 90% of Kenyans support their decision if a Pew Research on attitudes towards homosexuality in Kenya is anything to go by.<br /><br />In December 2013, I highlighted 10 African countries that were going the Nigeria and Uganda way in proposing, debating, enacting and assenting new laws that targeted same sex sexualities among men and women.

01 Mar 14

A dangerous new imperialism is on the rise in Africa and the Caribbean. It comes wearing a rainbow flag and dressed in pink. The recent wave of anti-gay laws on the African Continent and a two month visit to Jamaica where LGBT activists and homosexuals are in a battle for self-definition have helped to crystalize this suspicion. To be clear I am a Black, gay Jamaican male who has loved and lived for over 30 years in America. I identify myself thusly so you can understand that this is not a conclusion I come to easily. It comes from observing keenly the struggle for Gay Rights in America, Africa and the Caribbean for the past 30 years.

24 Feb 14

oming out will not be easy or even an option for everyone, but if you do decide to come out, I wish you luck! Visibility definitely matters.<br /><br />The truth is, I never wanted to have a conversation about who I have sex with, but because the government and the population is having that conversation, I too am forced to. The simple fact at the end of the day is: I am human. I am Nigerian. I am gay.<br /><br />Now my social experiment may or may not work. What I do know is that I must try. I will attempt to change minds, tackle homophobia and let Nigerians see a real life gay person: one introduction at a time.

24 Feb 14

Kill them. This sentiment has been expressed about homosexuals in Nigeria, both in the streets and in the media, especially since the Same Sex Marriage (Prohibition) Act came into operation on January 7, 2014 – again, and again. And again.

24 Feb 14

Editors Note: We are deeply saddened to announce the passing of radical and revolutionary South African activist Sally Gross. We can’t think of a better forum than the Audre Lorde global forum to pay tribute to another warrior upon whose shoulders we also stand.

24 Feb 14

Yet Smith fails to articulate the self-determination demonstrated on the part of LGBTQI Africans as proof against an imagined Africa where all people think negatively about queer and trans people.<br /><br />Even in Uganda, on the very day of the passing of the anti-homosexuality bill, queer and trans Ugandans, and their allies, are asserting their disapproval through a global media campaign aptly titled, #IAmGoingNowhere, according to Hakima Abbas, co-editor (along with Sokari Ekine) of the Queer African Reader. <br /><br />That there are those placing their lives on the line, today, should be ample enough proof that not all Africans are homophobic. It should also remind us to resist the urge to cast our critical gaze upon other geographical spaces before we cast it upon ourselves.

27 Dec 13

Junot Díaz reads Edwidge Danticat’s “Water Child” and discusses it with The New Yorker’s fiction editor, Deborah Treisman.

24 Dec 13

Diriye Osman is the acclaimed author of Fairytales For Lost Children, a collection of stories that takes an intimate, passionate look at the lives of gay and lesbian Somalis living in the beach towns of Somalia, the suburbs of Kenya and the streets of South London.<br /><br />In an intimate evening of storytelling badassery, Diriye brings his trademark slangy style to Wanstead Library, London, to celebrate LGBT History Month. He'll be performing extracts from Fairytales For Lost Children as well as signing copies of his book. As a special part of the LGBT History Month celebrations, Diriye will also give an exclusive performance of an exquisite, unpublished new story called I Once Belonged To The Sea, which will form part of his second collection-in-progress The Shape Of Purity.

24 Dec 13

Reviews of Mr Loverman<br /><br />'Heartbreaking, yet witty, this is a story that also needed to be told.' Book of the Year' - Observer<br /><br />'A brilliant study of great characters in modern London. As such - as Mr Barrington Walker Esq himself might have acknowledged - it is very clever indeed.' - Independent on Sunday<br /><br />'Fear and loathing of homosexuals has a long history in the West Indies….Bernardine Evaristo, in her funny, brave new novel, Mr Loverman …explores issues of homosexuality in the British West Indies and London's West Indian diaspora community… I loved Mr Loverman…this tender, even trailblazing novel. - The Spectator

24 Dec 13

"An incredibly readable and rich tapestry of Nigerian and American life, and the ways a handful of vivid characters-so vivid they feel like family-try to live in both worlds simultaneously. As she did so masterfully with Half of a Yellow Sun, Adichie paints on a grand canvas, boldly and confidently, equally adept at conveying the complicated political backdrop of Lagos as she is in bringing us into the day-to-day lives of her many new Americans-a single mom, a student, a hairdresser. This is a very funny, very warm and moving intergenerational epic that confirms Adichie's virtuosity, boundless empathy and searing social acuity."

24 Dec 13

Díaz turns his remarkable talent to<br />the haunting, impossible power of<br />love - obsessive love, illicit love,<br />fading love, maternal love. In prose<br />that is endlessly energetic, inventive,<br />tender, and funny, the stories in<br />This Is How You Lose Her lay<br />bare the infinite longing and inevitable<br />weakness of the human heart.<br />They remind us that passion always<br />triumphs over experience, and that<br />"the half-life of love is forever.

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