I'm a peripatetic wanderer through the awesome edifice of human knowledge, intent on self-development, reflection, and the synthesis of disparate ideas. I have always been, and will remain, a student. My interests are truly marvelous but this text box is too small to contain them.

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Member since Aug 23, 2006, follows 29 people, 38 public groups, 15548 public bookmarks (15704 total).

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  • The Internet of Things Is Coming for Your Children | Just Visiting @insidehighered about 13 hours ago
  • Redesigning America’s Community Colleges: A Response | Confessions of a Community College Dean @insidehighered about 13 hours ago
  • Web Archive Cooperative (WAC) about 13 hours ago
  • Engaging park stewards through biodiversity discovery: Social outcomes of participation in bioblitzes about 13 hours ago
  • Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies about 13 hours ago
  • The surprising effectiveness of scientific literacy courses about 13 hours ago
  • Why America’s obsession with STEM education is dangerous - The Washington Post about 13 hours ago
    • This dismissal of broad-based learning, however, comes from a fundamental misreading of the facts — and puts America on a dangerously narrow path for the future. The United States has led the world in economic dynamism, innovation and entrepreneurship thanks to exactly the kind of teaching we are now told to defenestrate. A broad general education helps foster critical thinking and creativity. Exposure to a variety of fields produces synergy and cross fertilization. Yes, science and technology are crucial components of this education, but so are English and philosophy. When unveiling a new edition of the iPad, Steve Jobs explained that “it’s in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough — that it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our hearts sing.”

      Innovation is not simply a technical matter but rather one of understanding how people and societies work, what they need and want. America will not dominate the 21st century by making cheaper computer chips but instead by constantly reimagining how computers and other new technologies interact with human beings.

    • This dismissal of broad-based learning, however, comes from a fundamental misreading of the facts — and puts America on a dangerously narrow path for the future. The United States has led the world in economic dynamism, innovation and entrepreneurship thanks to exactly the kind of teaching we are now told to defenestrate. A broad general education helps foster critical thinking and creativity. Exposure to a variety of fields produces synergy and cross fertilization. Yes, science and technology are crucial components of this education, but so are English and philosophy. When unveiling a new edition of the iPad, Steve Jobs explained that “it’s in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough — that it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our hearts sing.”

      Innovation is not simply a technical matter but rather one of understanding how people and societies work, what they need and want. America will not dominate the 21st century by making cheaper computer chips but instead by constantly reimagining how computers and other new technologies interact with human beings.

    • Americans should be careful before they try to mimic Asian educational systems, which are oriented around memorization and test-taking. I went through that kind of system. It has its strengths, but it’s not conducive to thinking, problem solving or creativity. That’s why most Asian countries, from Singapore to South Korea to India, are trying to add features of a liberal education to their systems. Jack Ma, the founder of China’s Internet behemoth Alibaba, recently hypothesized in a speech that the Chinese are not as innovative as Westerners because China’s educational system, which teaches the basics very well, does not nourish a student’s complete intelligence, allowing her to range freely, experiment and enjoy herself while learning: “Many painters learn by having fun, many works [of art and literature] are the products of having fun. So, our entrepreneurs need to learn how to have fun, too.”

      No matter how strong your math and science skills are, you still need to know how to learn, think and even write.

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  • We're Living In The Golden Age Of Star Trek Webseries Right Now about 16 hours ago
  • Personalizing Discovery without Sacrificing Serendipity | The Scholarly Kitchen about 17 hours ago
  • we hunted the mammoth | the new misogyny, tracked and mocked on Mar 30, 15

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