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Clay Burell
  • President Xi Jinping has signaled that a significant new wave of economic liberalization may be in the works. But in the realm of political reform, Xi also has signaled a deep reluctance.
  • many of the actions taken and techniques used under his year of leadership suggest a return to ideas and tactics that hark back to the days of Mao Zedong.
  • One such signal came during this past spring, when reports began to appear that the Party leadership was being urged to guard against seven political “perils,” including constitutionalism, civil society, “nihilistic” views of history, “universal values,” and the promotion of “the West’s view of media.” It also called on Party members to strengthen their resistance to “infiltration” by outside ideas, renew their commitment to work “in the ideological sphere,” and to handle with renewed vigilance all ideas, institutions, and people deemed threatening to unilateral Party rule.

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Clay Burell

The Myth of Tiananmen - Columbia Journalism Review

"The problem is this: as far as can be determined from the available evidence, no one died that night in Tiananmen Square.

A few people may have been killed by random shooting on streets near the square, but all verified eyewitness accounts say that the students who remained in the square when troops arrived were allowed to leave peacefully. Hundreds of people, most of them workers and passersby, did die that night, but in a different place and under different circumstances.

The Chinese government estimates more than 300 fatalities. Western estimates are somewhat higher. Many victims were shot by soldiers on stretches of Changan Jie, the Avenue of Eternal Peace, about a mile west of the square, and in scattered confrontations in other parts of the city, where, it should be added, a few soldiers were beaten or burned to death by angry workers."

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  • Mathews is an education reporter for The Washington Post. He was the paper’s first Beijing bureau chief and returned in 1989 to help cover the Tiananmen demonstrations
  • Over the last decade, many American reporters and editors have accepted a mythical version of that warm, bloody night. They repeated it often before and during Clinton’s trip. On the day the president arrived in Beijing, a Baltimore Sun headline (June 27, page 1A) referred to “Tiananmen, where Chinese students died.” A USA Today article (June 26, page 7A) called Tiananmen the place “where pro-democracy demonstrators were gunned down.” The Wall Street Journal (June 26, page A10) described “the Tiananmen Square massacre” where armed troops ordered to clear demonstrators from the square killed “hundreds or more.” The New York Post (June 25, page 22) said the square was “the site of the student slaughter.”
  • The problem is this: as far as can be determined from the available evidence, no one died that night in Tiananmen Square.

      

    A few people may have been killed by random shooting on streets near the square, but all verified eyewitness accounts say that the students who remained in the square when troops arrived were allowed to leave peacefully. Hundreds of people, most of them workers and passersby, did die that night, but in a different place and under different circumstances.

      

    The Chinese government estimates more than 300 fatalities. Western estimates are somewhat higher. Many victims were shot by soldiers on stretches of Changan Jie, the Avenue of Eternal Peace, about a mile west of the square, and in scattered confrontations in other parts of the city, where, it should be added, a few soldiers were beaten or burned to death by angry workers.

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Tania Sheko

Humans Need Not Apply - YouTube

Humans need not apply. Automation.

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Doug Peterson

Research Blog: Tone: An experimental Chrome extension for instant sharing over audio

Tone: An experimental Chrome extension for instant sharing over audio - http://t.co/HJ8vrF1ZG2 via @Firefox

— Doug Peterson (@dougpete) May 26, 2015

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isaac Mao
  • Sync” licenses are agreements for the use of music in audiovisual projects. Used in its strictest sense, a sync license refers to the use of a musical composition in an audiovisual work. The term “master use” license is sometimes used to refer to the use of a music recording (sometimes referred to as a “master”) in an audiovisual work. Sync and master use licenses can make money for songwriters, and master use licenses can make money for recording artists. It is possible for a license to include both a grant of rights in a song and a master if the same person wrote the song and produced the master.
Tania Sheko

The Living Artifact: An Open Letter/Invitation/Call for Help to the #rhizo15 Community | She's So Heavy

You guys were an awesome curriculum. I need to thank you all for helping me to put some structure around what I have long considered the natural way that I learn. via Pocket

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Tania Sheko

Rewilding the rhizome | Into the twilight: imaginings

My small, slow contribution for the final week of #rhizo15 is an invitation to none, one, and many, laid in a public library copy of Introduction: Rhizome within the pages of A Thousand Plateaus by Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. via Pocket

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Doug Peterson

Research Blog: Tone: An experimental Chrome extension for instant sharing over audio

Tone: An experimental Chrome extension for instant sharing over audio - http://t.co/HJ8vrF1ZG2 via @Firefox

Shared by Doug Peterson, 1 save total

Phil Taylor

COMMENTARY Q & A from Education Week - Sir Ken Robinson - Teachers With Apps

COMMENTARY Q & A from Education Week – Sir Ken Robinson http://t.co/Fpo9Fjm1cg

Shared by Phil Taylor, 1 save total

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