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Julie Lindsay

Some Very Bad News about the UNESCO OER Recommendation

The public draft included a definition of OER as follows:

Open Educational Resources (OERs) are teaching, learning and research materials in any medium – digital or otherwise – that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license… Open copyright licenses provide the public with free and perpetual permissions to:

(a) Retain – the right to create, own, and control copies of the content;
(b) Reuse – the right to use the content in a wide range of ways;
(c) Revise – the right to adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself;
(d) Remix – the right to combine the original or revised content with other material to create something new;
(e) Redistribute – the right to share copies of the original content, the revisions, or the remixes with others.

OER are defined in terms of copyright – either (1) in the public domain or (2) released under an open license. And the characteristics of a license that make it an “open license” are a free and perpetual grant of permission to engage in the 5R activities.

The final version includes this definition of OER:

Open Educational Resources (OER) are learning, teaching and research materials in any format and medium that reside in the public domain or are under copyright that have been released under an open license… Open license refers to a license that respects the intellectual property rights of the copyright owner and provides permissions granting the public the rights to access, re-use, re-purpose, adapt and redistribute educational materials.

OER are still defined in terms of copyright – either (1) in the public domain or (2) released under an open license. But the characteristics required to make a license an “open license” have been limited.

Shared by Julie Lindsay, 8 saves total

Beth Still

Twitter

Final Bearcats over Alliance. Western Conference Champs! ⁦@activities_shs⁩ pic.twitter.com/3tvGrkFRbt

— Justin Shaddick (@jshaddick) December 8, 2019

Shared by Beth Still, 1 save total

Beth Still

What's a 'Work for Hire' and Why Should You Care? - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Teachers don't have the rights to sell things they create for their classroom lessons anyway. Most materials are considered "works for hire" and are owned by their employer https://t.co/fze3P74vcJ

— Mary Beth Hertz (@mbteach) December 7, 2019
@PaidinAppls Teachers don't have the rights to sell things they create for their classroom lessons anyway. Most materials are considered "works for hire" and are owned by their employer https://t.co/fze3P74vcJ

Shared by Beth Still, 2 saves total

Beth Still

Twitter

Someone in the teachers' room at my school really likes Sprite. pic.twitter.com/nzyYNqGH45

— Richard Byrne (@rmbyrne) December 3, 2019

Shared by Beth Still, 1 save total

Beth Still

mobile.twitter.com

“Do you have any jellyfish?”
“I’m so sorry, my dear friend, but I do not.”
“Thank you, kind sir.”

-actual conversations happening during this game

Shared by Beth Still, 1 save total

Beth Still

Twitter

It was 5 years ago today I had the awesome privilege to be in the same room with these incredible Tech Rock Stars at the Google Teacher Acadamy in Austin, TX. There is so much talent in this group! Happy Anniversary #GTAATX14! pic.twitter.com/F1osPD…

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Beth Still

Adapt

Design Thinking Across the Curriculum- A new resource for schools https://t.co/cpjFjH9E0w via @NSWEducation

— Summer Howarth (@EduSum) December 1, 2019

Shared by Beth Still, 4 saves total

Beth Still

Twitter

— Jennifer King (@JenniferNKing) November 30, 2019

Shared by Beth Still, 2 saves total

Beth Still

Twitter

pic.twitter.com/lpg4CnalqF

— Sabastian Harsh (@HarshSabastian) November 29, 2019

Shared by Beth Still, 1 save total

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