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  • 28 Feb 12

    The Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center (PRC) will share in a $2.75 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a four-year study on the impact of massage therapy for people with osteoarthritis, or degenerative arthritis, of the knee.

  • 09 Feb 12

    A new initiative in Shelton and surrounding Valley towns hopes to get kids moving and eating right.

  • 08 Feb 12

    Even if we were to isolate sugar as public health enemy number one, its regulation would draw us into challenging subtleties.

    • NEWARK, N.J. - The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Health Related Professions  (UMDNJ-SHRP) is one of three institutions sharing a $2.75 million grant from the  National Institutes of Health (NIH) to investigate the impact of massage therapy  on people with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A combined research team at Duke  Integrative Medicine, Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center and UMDNJ-SHRP  will conduct a randomized controlled trial to definitively evaluate an  eight-week course of Swedish massage as a treatment for osteoarthritis of the  knee in terms of its effects on pain, stiffness, and physical function.  

      This is a continuation of a study that was initiated at UMDNJ-SHRP’s  Institute for Complementary and Alternative Medicine by Adam Perlman, MD, and  his team with support from an NIH American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  research grant in 2009. Perlman and his co-investigators, Susan Gould-Fogerite,  PhD and Gwendolyn Mahon, PhD, of UMDNJ-SHRP and David Katz, MD, of the  Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, will also gather data to study the  cost-effectiveness of massage as a form of treatment. Ultimately, they expect to  demonstrate that massage can serve as a valuable option for treating  osteoarthritis in clinical settings, which could help set the stage for  reimbursement from health insurance companies for this form of treatment.
  • 25 Jan 12

    Four-Year Study of Massage for Osteoarthritis of the Knee to be Conducted with Partners at Duke Integrative Medicine and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey

  • 16 Jan 12

    I live in a world where decent people occasionally eat chips. So I say it's a good thing to offer the best possible nutrition guidance -- and let the chips fall where they may. I can't figure out why some of my colleagues seem to have a chip... on their shoulder.

  • 12 Jan 12

    DERBY, CT (January 12, 2012) - In late December, Marketing Disease Prevention & Awareness (MDPA) began announcing its inductees into the MDPA Hall of Fame Class of 2012. The first inductee to be chosen is David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP, the founding director of the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center.

  • 09 Jan 12

    -- David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP: Dr. David Katz is the founding director of Yale University's Prevention Research Center. He received his BA from Dartmouth College (1984; Magna Cum Laude); his MD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1988); and his MPH from the Yale University School of Public Health (1993). He is a board certified specialist in Preventive Medicine/Public Health, and two-time Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine (1991; 2001). Katz is Director and founder of the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital (2000) in Derby, CT, and founder and president of the non-profit Turn the Tide Foundation (http://www.turnthetidefoundation.org).

    • The three initial SAB appointments include Dr. Steven H. Zeisel, MD, PhD, Dr. David Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP, and Dr. Daniel Pomp, MS, PhD, who will guide research activities and provide critical scientific input and strategic insight to GenoVive as the company continues to exploit and leverage current scientific breakthroughs to deliver a comprehensive and personalized weight management solution based on genetic science.
    • According to Dr. David Katz, the basic theme of healthful, sensible eating, and sensible approaches to weight control is not up for debate, but the best variation on that theme for an individual is. “We know that genetic variants influence metabolism with important implications for weight control,” said Dr. Katz. “Basing customized weight management approaches on genetic insights is an idea whose time has come. Doing so in a manner that fully respects the fundamentals of healthful eating is responsive to the needs of those frustrated by their weight control struggles and responsible about the use of available science.”
    • David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP: Dr. David Katz is the founding director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center. He received his BA from Dartmouth College (1984; Magna Cum Laude); his MD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1988); and his MPH from the Yale University School of Public Health (1993). He is a board certified specialist in Preventive Medicine/Public Health, and two-time Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine (1991; 2001). Katz is Director and founder of the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital (2000) in Derby, CT, and founder and president of the non-profit Turn the Tide Foundation (http://www.turnthetidefoundation.org).

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  • 09 Jan 12

    Dr. David Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP is a leading authority on nutrition, weight loss, and the prevention of chronic disease. He is the founding director of Yale University's Prevention Research Center at Griffin Hospital. Katz is Director and founder of the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital (2000) in Derby, CT, and founder and president of the non-profit Turn the Tide Foundation. Dr Katz has published over one hundred scientific articles and textbook chapters; nearly a thousand newspaper columns; innumerable commentaries and blogs; and 12 books to date.

  • 09 Jan 12

    I won't speak for my friends and colleagues in public health, although I suspect they feel the same; I'll just speak for myself. I am nobody's nanny. But as you play with the military-industrial establishment with your health on the line, I don't mind being a referee.

  • 06 Jan 12

    NuVal:
    The Yale University Prevention Research Center at Griffin Hospital developed the Overall Nutritional Quality Index (ONQI), an algorithm that generates a single score for a food based on nutritional composition; those numbers are then ranked to determine relative nutritional value. The ONQI was worked on over a two-year period by a large team of nutrition, public health, and medical experts from top universities and research centers around the country until they came up with the NuVal Nutritional Scoring System. Every food gets a score from one to 100. The shopper can thus pick up two different brands of, say, chocolate chip cookies and determine which is healthier by looking at the number. How much easier can it get?

    • NuVal
      The Yale University Prevention Research Center at Griffin Hospital developed the Overall Nutritional Quality Index (ONQI), an algorithm that generates a single score for a food based on nutritional composition; those numbers are then ranked to determine relative nutritional value. The ONQI was worked on over a two-year period by a large team of nutrition, public health, and medical experts from top universities and research centers around the country until they came up with the NuVal Nutritional Scoring System. Every food gets a score from one to 100. The shopper can thus pick up two different brands of, say, chocolate chip cookies and determine which is healthier by looking at the number. How much easier can it get?

      Example:
      Nabisco Chips Ahoy chewy Real Chocolate Chip Cookies Score: 2
      Famous Amos Chocolate Chip Cookie Score: 10
      Kashi TLC Tasty Little Chewy Oatmeal cookies Score: 32

      You can check out all sorts of scores on the website.
  • 04 Jan 12

    The lead article in the NY Times Magazine on Jan. 1, 2012, no doubt timed to coincide with the annual bumper crop of weight loss resolutions, is a poignant and personal essay by Tara Parker-Pope suggesting that we are, in essence, at war with our bodies over weight control.

  • 03 Jan 12

    Health Notes is a weekly feature that highlights health and wellness news in the area. Hospitals and other health related agencies may e-mail items to scappetta@hersamacorn.com.

    • Phlebotomy courses

      Applications are being accepted for the next Patient Care Technician and Phlebotomy courses offered by the Griffin Hospital School of Allied Health Careers. Anyone age 18 or older with a high school diploma or GED may apply for admission. Early registration is encouraged for both courses, as space is limited.

      Winter session of the School's Patient Care Technician (PCT) program begins Monday, Jan. 23, with classes held Monday and Fridays, 9-3:30. Students are able to choose the Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday portion of the program either days from 9-noon or evenings from 6-9. Program runs for 16 consecutive weeks and offers ample hands-on training and opportunities for practical experience in the School's fully equipped mock hospital room. Tuition includes four weeks practical training at Griffin Hospital, which is full time, Monday-Friday, 7-3:30.

      Winter session of the School's Phlebotomy course begins Tuesday, Jan. 24, with classes held Tuesday-Thursday for 13 consecutive weeks. Both day and evening class options available. Tuition includes a 40-hour externship, national certification, lab coats, and books.

      For more information or to apply, call 203-732-1276.

    • Women & heart disease

      Seventh annual Women and Heart Disease program, Thursday, Feb. 2, Grassy Hill Lodge, 30 Sodom Lane, Derby. Registration and a silent auction starts at 5 p.m., followed by dinner and program at 6.

      Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., C.D.N., health and media expert, consultant and author of Get Smart: Prescription for Boosting Brain Power & Optimizing Total Body Health and nutrition coordinator at the Center for Cancer Care at Griffin Hospital, is guest speaker. Cost is $35. Call Daun Barrett, R.N., 203-732-7584; or Mary Swansiger, R.N., 203-732-1137.

    • Genetic counseling

      The Center for Cancer Care at Griffin Hospital offers cancer genetic counseling services to individuals and families as part of the Center's comprehensive model of patient-centered care.

      Cancer genetic counseling is the process of collecting a patient's detailed personal and family history, assessing their personal risk, and discussing their genetic testing options. Genetic tests are tests on blood and other tissue used to identify genetic disorders.

      For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call 203-732-1260.

      Diabetes support

      Diabetes Education & Support Group meets September -June, second Tuesday of the month, 6:30 p.m., Griffin Hospital, Derby. Open to diabetics and their families; 203-732-1137.

      Bariatric patient support

      To help bariatric patients bridge the gap between the time of surgery and reaching their healthy weight, Griffin Bariatrics has assembled a Clothes Closet with men's and women's clothing in barely worn or new condition, which has been donated by bariatric patients and hospital staff and family members. The Clothes Closet is open the second Wednesday of each month, 4:30-6:30 p.m., prior to monthly "On Track" support group meetings; 203-732-7108; kfisher@griffinhealth.org.

      Fibromyalgia support

      Fibromyalgia Support Group meets the last Tuesday of the month, 2 p.m., Griffin Hospital, 130 Division St., Derby. Information: Daun Barrett, 203-732-7584.

    5 more annotations...

  • 03 Jan 12

    I would make everyone a nutrition expert by putting an objective, evidence-based, at-a-glance measure of overall nutritional quality on display everywhere people and food come together, and thus close every loophole to marketing distortions. Then, I would attach to this metric a system of financial incentives so that the more nutritious the food, the less it costs. The incentives would not constitute a new cost, but rather an opportunity for savings. They would be paid by the entities that currently pay the costs of disease care -- insurance companies, large employers and the federal government. The costs of subsidizing cabbage are trivial compared to the cost of CABG, so says the king (not to mention the world's leading health economists). Incentivizing healthful choices could save us a lot of money. Everyone can win.

  • 03 Jan 12

    Among the big medical news stories of the past week is an increasingly global tale of failing French breast implants. According to Reuters, as many as 400,000 women in multiple countries are potential victims of defective implants, prone to leakage and made using a grade of silicone never approved for cosmetic surgery by a French company shut down in 2010.

  • 03 Jan 12

    This is an aspirational time of year. Peace on earth, good will toward man (and woman). Tidings of comfort and joy.

    • Genetic counseling

      The Center for Cancer Care at Griffin Hospital offers cancer genetic counseling services to individuals and families as part of the Center's comprehensive model of patient-centered care.

      Cancer genetic counseling is the process of collecting a patient's detailed personal and family history, assessing their personal risk, and discussing their genetic testing options. Genetic tests are tests on blood and other tissue used to identify genetic disorders.

      For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call 203-732-1260.

    • Phlebotomy courses

      Applications are being accepted for the next Patient Care Technician and Phlebotomy courses offered by the Griffin Hospital School of Allied Health Careers. Anyone age 18 or older with a high school diploma or GED may apply for admission. Early registration is encouraged for both courses, as space is limited.

      Winter session of the School's Patient Care Technician (PCT) program begins Monday, Jan. 23, with classes held Monday and Fridays, 9-3:30. Students are able to choose the Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday portion of the program either days from 9-noon or evenings from 6-9. Program runs for 16 consecutive weeks and offers ample hands-on training and opportunities for practical experience in the School's fully equipped mock hospital room. Tuition includes four weeks practical training at Griffin Hospital, which is full time, Monday-Friday, 7-3:30.

      Winter session of the School's Phlebotomy course begins Tuesday, Jan. 24, with classes held Tuesday-Thursday for 13 consecutive weeks. Both day and evening class options available. Tuition includes a 40-hour externship, national certification, lab coats, and books.

      For more information or to apply, call 203-732-1276.

    • Diabetes support

      Diabetes Education & Support Group meets September -June, second Tuesday of the month, 6:30 p.m., Griffin Hospital, Derby. Open to diabetics and their families; 203-732-1137.

    7 more annotations...

  • 13 Dec 11

    I trust you know what "they" say about opinions: everybody has one. Just like everybody has a... well, you know what they say.

  • 09 Dec 11

    On Dec. 1, the NY Times published a tale rather disturbing to those of us who count dogs not only among "man's" best friends, but our very own.

  • 07 Dec 11

    David L. Katz, director of the Yale-Griffin Prevention research Center at Griffin Hospital in Derby agreed that the state's socioeconomic profile has a lot to do with the ranking. "The evidence is overwhelming that being well-off in nearly any society is associated with good health outcomes," he said.

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