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Anthony Gooden's List: 3.6 Digital Citizenship

  • Mar 23, 13

    Sherif Arafa is an artist help overthrow Mubarak government

      • AS EGYPTIANS PROTESTED BY the thousands in the streets of Cairo in the weeks leading up to the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak, the government attempted to respond by cracking down on the media and shutting down the nation's Internet.
        But Mubarak should have known that the shutdown wouldn't prevent top Egyptian cartoonist Sherif Arafa from drawing about the corrupt leadership trying to retain power. After all, the ancient Egyptians were the first civilization in history to have editorial cartoons, so it's fitting that cartoons would come into play in the historic overthrow of Mubarak's government.AS EGYPTIANS PROTESTED BY the thousands in the streets of Cairo in the weeks leading up to the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak, the government attempted to respond by cracking down on the media and shutting down the nation's Internet.
        But Mubarak should have known that the shutdown wouldn't prevent top Egyptian cartoonist Sherif Arafa from drawing about the corrupt leadership trying to retain power. After all, the ancient Egyptians were the first civilization in history to have editorial cartoons, so it's fitting that cartoons would come into play in the historic overthrow of Mubarak's government.AS EGYPTIANS PROTESTED BY the thousands in the streets of Cairo in the weeks leading up to the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak, the government attempted to respond by cracking down on the media and shutting down the nation's Internet.
        But Mubarak should have known that the shutdown wouldn't prevent top Egyptian cartoonist Sherif Arafa from drawing about the corrupt leadership trying to retain power. After all, the ancient Egyptians were the first civilization in history to have editorial cartoons, so it's fitting that cartoons would come into play in the historic overthrow of Mubarak's government. As the protests heightened in Egypt, Mubarak unleashed an attack on international media covering the demonstrations in the street. His supporters assaulted reporters, and security forces obstructed and detained journalists in an effort to stymie coverage of the unrest that eventually brought down his government.Arafa said, now that Mubarak is out, he's noticing changes in the country's national media that make him hopeful about the future of press freedom in Egypt.
        "I'm noticing the return of respected experts who were banned from appearing on Egyptian TV, like Nobel Prize winners Dr. Mohammed El Baradei and Dr. Ahmed Zwail," Arafa said. "TV and newspapers have suddenly become respectfu

      • pictures of the collapsing Egypt

  • Cyber Network and Media

    Sherif Arafa is an artist help overthrow Mubarak government used his painting and drawings to show that the government was going under. Mubarak and his follows didn't like and knew if they took him down would cause a bigger problem.

  • Digital Tools

    Digital Commerce, digital Communication, Digital Literacy, Digital etiquette, Digital security and Digital rights and responsibility.

  • Digital Tools

    Egyptian cartoonist Sherif Arafa from drawing about the corrupt leadership trying to retain power. After all, the ancient Egyptians were the first civilization in history to have editorial cartoons, so it's fitting that cartoons would come into play in the historic overthrow of Mubarak's government.

  • links

    http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=58152407&site=ehost-live

  • Links

    http://web.ebscohost.com.oclc.fullsail.edu:81/ehost/detail?sid=6e4007c5-5c65-49c5-83e4-8b1dcbc7627c%40sessionmgr4&vid=1&hid=20&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=a9h&AN=58152407

  • Links

    http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=58152407&site=ehost-live

  • Mar 06, 13

    these are some digital tools that unpowered the Egyptian dictatorship

    • Digital Access
    • Technology users need to be aware of and support electronic access f

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    • Five days after Egypt’s government cut its citizens off from the global Internet, the country has plugged in again
    • In fact, the struggle may be just beginning, as pro-government thugs arrive to intimidate protestors and beat up journalists.

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  • Blocking The Internet

    Mubarak knew that the country was struggling to maintain power. The people was unhappy and begin to post and blog about the issues that was going on in the country. They used popular sites like Facebook and Twitter. The Government caused an online blackout that only las for five days.

  • Mar 23, 13

    The Broadcasting Media like big name company CNN wanted to know what wag going own the the country.

    • Read full coverage of the unrest in Egypt updated continually by CNN reporters worldwide. Send your photos and video to iReport and see CNN in Arabic here.
    • State Department has offered via Twitter an amended advisory to U.S. citizens in Egypt, saying now that those who wish to depart Egypt on a U.S. government-chartered flight should report to the airport "ASAP after the morning end of curfew."

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  • Mar 23, 13

    the country shops and people was affected by the falling empire Egypt and the people used blogs and radio to broadcast how the country needs change.

    • President Mubarak is gone!" Laughing, shouting in relief, hundreds of people, streaming the Egyptian flag above them, began running toward the big screen in Cairo's Tahrir Square last Friday. Two minutes later, the jubilation -- a culmination of over two weeks of an impassioned popular uprising -- ended. It was just a rumour. More than a week after the "March of Millions," a climactic day of mass peaceful protest that was followed by a bloody -- and some say government-staged -- onslaught by supporters of the regime, and the transformation of Tahrir into a barricaded stronghold for the protesters, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak
      • Mubarak is facing the most serious challenge since he took over the government following the assassination of Anwar Sadat in October 1981. The danger is not so much that the Gamaa will seize power. They lack the popular appeal and the talent to take over any time soon. The militants gun down policemen, ambush officials and hostile intellectuals, and terrorize tourists with bombs near the pyramids or the Karnak Temple. The government hits back with equal ferocity. Suspected extremists are rounded up by the score in bloody sweeps that have left many bystanders dead or wounded. The economy stagnated during the 1980s, while external debt rose by nearly 150 percent, from $21 billion to $50 billion. In 1991, with arrears to foreign creditors mounting.Even private businessmen are far from unrestrained admirers of reform. They have spent large sums to obtain permission to operate in Egypt. Protection often makes their plants highly profitable. The last thing they want is relaxed rules that allow competitors entry into their markets.Egyptians may bridle at American interference, but the United States has little choice but to push harder--albeit diplomatically--for reform. Mubarak and Egypt probably have time to make adjustments, but the recent troubles show that they cannot afford to muddle along forever.
        While supporting Mubarak, the United States should avoid adopting a broadly hostile stance toward Islam. The troubles in Egypt may signal that a period of change is coming to the Middle East, which has so far avoided the upheavals that have swept the communist world. The Arab nationalist military regimes that have dominated the Middle Eastern stage for four decades appear to have worn out their welcome. While the Gamaa and other Islamic revolutionaries do not seem to be the Arab world's Václav Havels or Lech Walesas, American policymakers should keep open minds about Arab leaders with strong Islamic credentials--and indeed about other emerging agents of change. A more traditional, Islamic Arab world does not have to be a more anti-American one, unless the United States helps make that happen

    • remains in power.

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  • Concerns

    http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=59406789&site=ehost-live

    Egyptian cartoonist Sherif Arafa from drawing about the corrupt leadership trying to retain power. After all, the ancient Egyptians were the first civilization in history to have editorial cartoons, so it's fitting that cartoons would come into play in the historic overthrow of Mubarak's government.

    • Mubarak is facing the most serious challenge since he took over the government following the assassination of Anwar Sadat in October 1981. The danger is not so much that the Gamaa will seize power. They lack the popular appeal and the talent to take over any time soon
    • http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=58152407&site=ehost-live

    21 more annotations...

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